28 May 2020

1) The aircraft manufacture Boeing is laying off almost 12,000 workers this week, a result of the coronavirus crisis impact on the aircraft company. Boeing, which is the largest exporter in the U.S., is trimming its workforce by about 10% which include international locations. It is anticipated the airline industry will take some years to recover with air travel dropping a whopping 95% because of the virus, and major airlines canceling the majority of their domestic flights while suspending nearly all international flights. The company suffered a major set back with its 737 MAX grounding that resulted in near record number of order cancellations for passenger jets with zero new orders in April. This has been Boeing’s worst year in decades.

2) The discount home goods retailer Tuesday Morning has filed for bankruptcy, a result of the prolong store closings from Covid-19. The lost revenues created an insurmountable financial hurdle in a company that was thriving before the pandemic. The chain is closing 230 of its nearly 700 US stores across America. The first phase of closures of 130 stores will begin this summer. This is in line with another home goods retailer, Pier 1, which filed for bankruptcy in February, another casualty of the virus.

3) More than one in every six young workers have stopped working because of the coronavirus pandemic world wide. There are fears that young workers (15 to 28 years old) could face the inability to get proper training or gain access to jobs long after the pandemic ends, maybe even deep into their careers. Of those still working, about 23% report reduction in the number of hours they work. For 178 million young workers around the world, more than 40% are in the food services and hospitality industries, which is the hardest hit sector from the virus. Three fourths of the young workers are in informal jobs or casual labor. In addition, many companies in the U.S. are cutting salaries of those who still have a job, trying to remain in business, which will reduce discretionary income that will further slow economic recovery.

4) Stock market closings for – 27 MAY 20:

Dow 25,548.27 up 553.16
Nasdaq 9,412.36 up 72.14
S&P 500 3,036.13 up 44.367

10 Year Yield: down at 0.68%

Oil: down at $32.22

15 May 2020

1) There are growing fears of another economic bomb about to go off. A popping of the housing bubble, much like the 2008 bubble collapse of the housing market, may happen as early as July. Last time, the collapse of the housing market played out over four years, but for the pandemic, the rate could be much faster, as is being seen with the stock market. Home sales have been languishing, especially with the treat of the virus and people reluctant to let strangers tour their homes with possible infections. It is estimated that 15% of homeowners will fall behind on their mortgages and this would mean more delinquencies than during the Great Depression. This in turn is causing a tightening of lending standards which could continue even after the crisis subsides. All this makes for a bubble waiting to burst.

2) Delta Air Lines Inc. has announced they plan to retire their fleet of eighteen Boeing 777 jumbo jets, and will replace them with Airbus SE aircraft. This constitutes another major financial blow to the beleaguered aircraft manufacture struggling with their 737 MAX troubles from over a year ago. Delta attributes the early retirement of their 777 fleet to the pandemic impact and the need to economize with newer fuel efficient aircraft.

3) Growing fears of a slow recovery is beginning to show cracks in the markets as investor’s anticipation of a quick recovery of the economy fades. For weeks, the hopes that the massive stimulus of $3 trillion dollars would spur a relatively quick recovery later in the year, coupled with a hot rebound of the stock market despite the massive numbers of layoffs, but now hope is fading. The growing economic uncertainty of just how many people can restart their lives amid the uncertainty of controlling the virus, plus the dangers of opening up too early, is causing investors to rethink their view of how the economy will fair in the next few months, even the next few years.

4) Stock market closings for – 14 MAY 20:

Dow 23,625.34 up 377.37
Nasdaq 8,943.72 up 80.55
S&P 500 2,852.50 up 32.50

10 Year Yield: down at 0.62%

Oil: up at $27.98

20 February 2020

1) The chip maker Intel announced a chip which makes quantum computers smaller and faster, thus bringing the promise of quantum computer to realization. Working with QuTech, Intel has developed a new chip called Horse Ridge that should make quantum computers smaller, faster and requires less deep cooling. The system on a chip uses Intel’s FinFET low power process, having four radio frequency channels that control a total of 128 qubits, which is more than double the 49 qubits from back in 2018. For a quantum computer to be viable it needs over 1 million qubits.

2) The technology innovation company Alphabet has ended its work on Makani, a design to generate power using wind turbines attached to kites. While demonstration flights were successful, the path to commercialization was considered to be longer and riskier than expected. Makani was a seven year project which developed a 20 kilowatt demonstrator kite into a utility scale model generating 600 kilowatts.

3) Boeing Aircraft’s 737 MAX has met with another problem- foreign-object debris in the fuel tanks of several aircraft. Boeing is conducting a voluntary inspection for debris in undelivered aircraft with further action based on its findings, but doesn’t anticipate this problem will delay re-certification of the aircraft and it resumption of deliveries. Furthermore, Boeing plans to inspect the fuel tanks on all undelivered 737 MAX planes.

4) Stock market closings for – 19 FEB 20:

Dow 29,348.03 up 115.84
Nasdaq 9,817.18 up 84.44
S&P 500 3,386.15 up 15.86

10 Year Yield: up at 1.57%

Oil: up at $53.56

13 February 2020

1) NASA (National Air and Space Administration) has asked for a 12% increase to give a $25.2 billion dollar budget for next year. Nearly half of this years proposed budget is for NASA’s lunar project with much of the money going to the biggest American space companies. Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Aerojet Rocketdyne will be the primary beneficiaries with $1.4 billion dollars going to the Orion spacecraft and $2.26 billion dollars for the Space Launch System. There is $3.37 billion dollars proposed to fund a crewed lunar lander system.

2) Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell suggest that the central bank may not have the ability to fight the next recession and therefore Congress may need to get ready to help. This is a result of the already low interest rate, one of the prime tools used by the central bank to counter recession trends. Tax cuts and government spending increases may be necessary to fight a downturn, for there is little else the central bank has to counter a recession.

3) The giant aircraft maker Boeing Aircraft is facing bigger problems than just fixing its 737MAX and getting it certified to fly. The company needs to be focused on its next generation of passenger aircraft. Boeing didn’t get any new orders for aircraft in January compared with 45 orders last year, while delivering 13 airliners compared with 46 last January. Boeing is falling behind its rival Airbus and must build its next generation of planes to remain competitive. This means getting its 777X finished and ready for delivery with its other wide body plane, the 787 Dreamliner. In the background is a possible new design concept the 797.

4) Stock market closings for – 12 FEB 20:

Dow 29,551.42 up 275.08
Nasdaq 9,725.96 up 87.02
S&P 500 3,379.45 up 21.70

10 Year Yield: up at 1.63%

Oil: up at $51.69

20 January 2020

1) A year ago, Boeing Aircraft had record revenues of over $100 billion dollars, anticipating delivery of record number of aircraft including the 737 MAX jetliner. With the grounding of its 737 MAX, that has been reversed with Boeing posting losses from massive pay outs as well as lost revenues as undelivered aircraft sit waiting in its parking lots. Boeing may ultimately have $20 billion dollars in cost from the 737 MAX problem. Boeing’s problems has been a bonus for China’s airline manufacturing giving them a big advantage to gain market share.

2) India is resisting Amazon’s efforts to expand into India with an investment of $1 billion dollars, fearful of predatory business practices. The investment would bring Amazon India investment up to $6.5 billion dollars. But Amazon is meeting growing resistance, first with an Indian anti-trust investigation by Indian regulators, then protest from a confederation of Indian traders and organizations.

3) As hiring surged in November, the employment market got tighter, job openings plunged to their lowest level in nearly two years. The total vacancies is down by 561,000 to 6.8 million for the month. This is the lowest since February of 2018, the trend telling the economy has finally reached full employment. The biggest drops came in retail and construction.

4) Stock market closings for – 17 JAN 20: All three exchanges closed on record highs.

Dow          29,348.10    up    50.46
Nasdaq       9,388.94    up    31.81
S&P 500      3,329.62    up     12.81

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.84%

Oil:    up   at    $58.81

17 December 2019

1) The aircraft manufacturer Boeing Aircraft has announced it is bringing production of the 737 MAX to a temporary halt the first of January. Boeing is America’s largest manufacturing exporter and the largest component of the Dow Jones industrial average, so there are fears that Boeing’s decision will send shockwaves through the American economy. Boeing will redeploy workers on the MAX production line to other projects therefore avoiding layoffs and furloughs. After the aircraft’s grounding nine months ago, Boeing has continually encountered hurdles with domestic and global regulators.

2) Stocks closed at record highs on Monday, their fourth straight gain, a result of the Phase One trade deal between China and the U.S., clearing the way for Wall Street to end a banner year. A further positive note is strong economic data out of China, topping expectations, with American economic data showing positive signs too.

3) For the last few years, sprits distillers have seen explosive growth, a result of a tax cut from the Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act. But this tax cut is due to expire on 31 December, resulting in a 400% increase in Federal liquor tax, which would put the brakes on the distilling business. Renewing the tax break is running into congressional dysfunction and partisan fighting over taxes and spending.

4) Stock market closings for – 16 DEC 19:

Dow              28,235.89    up    100.51
Nasdaq          8,814.23    up      79.35
S&P 500         3,191.45    up       22.65

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.89%

Oil:    up   at    $60.19

4 October 2019

1) MGM Resorts has reached agreement with families of victims who were killed in the October 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas. The settlement for the 2,500 family victims will be almost $800 million dollars with the agreement that all pending litigation against MGM will be dismissed. The shooting left 58 dead while wounding hundreds of others.

2) Soon to be implemented, tariffs will make imports more expensive for Americans, such as Scotch and Irish whiskies, Parmesan cheese and French wine. The tariffs will be on $7.5 billion dollars of European imports. Further tariffs are threaten over aircraft subsidies by the European Union, coming at a time when economies have been hurt by the US-China trade war. The World Trade Organization has ruled America can impose tariffs because the European Union has failed to abide by earlier ruling of Airbus subsidies.

3) The service-sector activity in the U.S. slowed to its weakest pace in three years this September. This is another sign that the U.S. economy may be weakening where the services sector accounts for more than two thirds of economic activity. The non-manufacturing index fell to 52.6 last month, which was the lowest reading since August 2016 and far below the 55.3 expectations.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 OCT 19:

Dow                 26,201.04    up    122.42
Nasdaq              7,872.26    up      87.02
S&P 500             2,910.63    up      23.02

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.54%

Oil:    down   at    $52.34

14 August 2019

1) Boeing aircraft has not received any new orders for their 737 MAX in six months. This could give Boeing’s competitor Airbus a major market advantage having made 389 commercial plane deliveries in the same six months, making Airbus the largest supplier of this market segment with its A320 design. The grounding of the 737 MAX has forced Boeing to park completed aircraft to await its air worthiness to be restored.

2) Signs of inflation are increasing as U.S. consumer prices increased broadly in July. Expectations are for the Federal Reserve to again cut interest rates next month as much as half a percentage point in September. Continue trade tensions between China and America out weight fears of inflation so interest rates will continue to remain low, if not go lower.

3) Fears grow that protests in Hong Kong, which have persisted for the last two months, could have a lasting detrimental effect on U.S. and global markets. Hong Kong operates with a high degree of autonomy from China, having its own currency and judiciary system. This is fueling the rising concerns of investors of a major violent eruption of conflict between Hong Kong and main line China, coupled with concerns over U.S. – China trade war and the total impact on the world markets. With Hong Kong a financial hub, an invasion by Chinese troops with sever repressive measures on the people could disrupt other markets across the world. Furthermore, violence with loss of life could make it impossible for President Trump to resolve differences with China.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 AUG 19:

Dow              26,279.91    up    382.20
Nasdaq           8,016.36    up    152.95
S&P 500          2,926.32    up      43.23

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.68%
Oil:    down   at    $56.73

25 April 2019

1) Boeing’s profits have plunged because of their 737 MAX problems, which has cost them one billion dollars so far. The fix for the aircraft is causing uncertainty in their earnings and how long it will take before the aircraft is re-certified for operating. There are further concerns over foreign re-certification taking longer than the FAA. Boeing had 4,600 unfilled orders for the 737 MAX.

2) Almost one half of American parents are cutting back on their retirement savings to help pay their adult children’s bills. Additionally, parents are not setting aside some amount of their earns for retirement savings, instead are helping their children pay bills. The average American needs three-quarters of a million dollars in savings to retire and maintain their standard of living.

3) Many major companies are raising prices, considering that raising prices a little will help increase profits. Some of these companies are the railroads, Kimberly-Clark, Procter and Gamble and Whirlpool. Rising wages and raising productivity will tend to increase inflation.

4) 24 APR 19 Stock market closings: Red across the board with everything down.

Dow           26,597.05    down    59.34
Nasdaq        8,102.02    down    18.81
S&P 500       2,927.25    down      6.43

10 Year Yield:     down   at    2.52%

Oil:      down   at     $65.74