16 March 2021

1) The technology known as carbon capture and storage, a concept that has been around for at least a quarter century to reduce the climate damaging emissions from factories, is being pursued by major international oil companies. The idea sounds deceptively simple, just divert pollutants before they can escape into the air, and bury them deep in the ground where they are harmless. But the technology has proved to be hugely expensive, and so has not caught on as quickly as advocates hoped. Exxon Mobil, BP and Royal Dutch Shell plus lesser known Norway’s Equinor, France’s Total, and Italy’s Eni are investors in capture and storage projects.

2) Reports are, that amid all the trillion dollar spending, the White House is now starting to consider how to pay for the programs meant to bolster long term economic growth with investments in infrastructure, clean energy and education. The challenges are twofold: 1) how much of the bill is paid for with tax increases and 2) which policies to finance with more borrowing. The administration hasn’t decided whether to pursue a wealth tax. With interest rates so low, U.S. borrowing costs are manageable right now. The federal government currently collects the biggest chunk of its revenue, about half in 2019, from individual income taxes, which now tops out at 37% of income above $518,000 per year. For now, there are few signs of inflationary spiral or fiscal crisis that policy makers thought would accompany debt levels like today’s. The Congressional Budget Office this month projected that the national debt would double as a proportion of gross domestic product over the next 30 years. But the cost of borrowing is rising for the government and across the economy so the large debt could mean trouble in the future.

3) India’s foreign-exchange reserves has surpassed Russia’s to become the world’s fourth largest, as India central bank continues to hoard dollars to cushion the economy against any sudden outflows. Reserves for both countries have mostly flattened this year after months of rapid increase. India’s reserves, enough to cover roughly 18 months of imports, have been bolstered by a rare current-account surplus, raising inflows into the local stock market and foreign direct investment. India’s foreign currency holdings fell by $4.3 billion to $580.3 billion as of March 5, edging out Russia’s $580.1 billion pile. China has the largest reserves, followed by Japan and Switzerland on the International Monetary Fund table.

4) Stock market closings for – 15 MAR 21:

Dow 32,953.46 up by 174.82
Nasdaq 3,459.71 up by 139.84
S&P 500 3,968.94 up by 25.60

10 Year Yield: down at 1.61%

Oil: down at $65.29

TODAY INAUGURATES A NEW PRESIDENT & NEW VICE PRESIDENT……..

By Economic & Finance Report:

President Elect Joe Biden and Vice President Elect Kamala Harris will be sworn in at the capital at approx. 12pm est today, Wednesday, January 20, 2021. It has been reported that they will be sworn in at Capitol Hill outside to a small audience of 2,000 invited only guests (socially distancing) because of Covid-19 protocols.

President Donald Trump has already vacated the White House earlier this morning at 8am est, Wednesday, January 20, 2021. Making a smooth transition for the incoming President (Joe Biden) to occupy the “People’s House”, the historic White House. -SB

Image Credit: Business Insider

16 November 2020

1) Experts predict the growth of jobs will slow during a Biden presidency, simply because the easy gains are almost gone. So the easy part of job recovery will be history by the time President-elect Joe Biden moves into the White House, leaving a particularly difficult environment for an administration seeking to right the economy. The job growth rate has decline every month since June, and this will be even worst with the resurgence of the coronavirus putting economic growth into reverse. One cause of this is companies who laid off workers at the start of the pandemic, have since gone out of business, leaving nothing for laid-off workers to return to. Over a million workers are still being laid off or fired each month, with about 3.7 million additional workers who have quit working or looking for work entirely since February. Furthermore, it takes longer for skilled workers to return to work simply because there are few jobs available to choose from.

2) Massachusetts was one of the hardest hit states by the virus last spring, and this summer was seen as a model for infection control, but now, the number of Covid-19 cases are climbing once again with confirmed deaths surpassing 10,000. So Massachusetts is having to return to restrictions approaching another shutdown. And Massachusetts isn’t the only state seeing a strong resurgence in the coronavirus. California becomes the second state to top one million cases, with Texas closely following, who hit the grim milestone earlier this week. Just five states account for about one third of new cases. Nationwide, the pandemic has killed more than 240,000 forcing states to impose measures as cases surge. Many officials attribute raising number of cases to complacency in travel and social settings such as bars and house parties.

3) Canada welcomes Hong Kong refugees amid China crackdown by easing immigration requirements for them. Canada plans to target young, educated Hong Kongers. Their plan includes the creation of a new three-year open work permit for recent graduates and shortening eligibility for permanent residency to one year. This comes at a low point in Canada-China relations, after the 2018 arrest of a top Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. executive. Hong Kongers already in Canada will now be eligible to apply for permanent residency sooner, provided they meet language and education requirements and have worked for a year in Canada.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 NOV 20:

Dow 29,479.81 up by 399.64
Nasdaq 11,829.29 up by 119.70
S&P 500 3,585.15 up by 48.14

10 Year Yield: up at 0.89%

Oil: down at $40.12

6 November 2020

1) This year’s elections are revealing some interesting things about the new young voters and the society they want. Voters are backing legalized drugs, higher wages and voting restrictions. In Oregon, they have eliminated all criminal penalties for possession of hard drugs. Four other states legalized recreational marijuana. Voters continue to support higher wages with minimum wage settings in states, with Florida raising their minimum to $15 an hour. Abortion encountered more restrictions on the state level. Several states adopted measures, including constitutional amendments, to limit voting rights to U.S. citizens only.

2) The White House task force is warning that new cases of Covid-19 are increasing ‘exponentially’ despite President Trump’s claims that the pandemic would vanish on November 4. Rising case numbers, hospitalizations, and deaths nationwide are causing the task force to sound dire warnings. Recommendations are 1) Do not gather without a mask with individuals living outside of your household, 2) Always wear a mask in public places and, 3) Stop gatherings beyond immediate household until number of cases and positive tests have decrease significantly. The task force is warning states and universities/colleges of the risks during the up coming holiday season and the increase risk of spreading of the virus. States with the highest number of new cases per 100,000 are North Dakota followed by South Dakota, Wisconsin, Montana, Wyoming, Iowa, Alaska, Nebraska, Utah, and Idaho. Vermont remains the state with the lowest number of new cases.

3) Renowned investor Warren Buffett’s (Berkshire Hathaway CEO) favorite market indicator nears record high, signaling stocks are overvalued and riskier than ever for investing. His indicator takes the total market capitalization of a country’s stocks and divides it by quarterly GDP in order to compare the stock market’s valuation to the size of the economy. Currently that’s 168% which signals a record disconnect between asset prices and the economy, and a warning to investors to exercise a great deal of caution towards equities as an asset class. The stock market has never been as expensive as it is today, and not only does this mean that forward returns will likely be exceptionally poor, it means that downside risk has also never been greater than it is today. This indicator also soared before the dot-com bubble burst and surged in the months leading up to the 2008 financial crisis.

4) Stock market closings for – 5 NOV 20:

Dow 28,390.18 up by 542.52
Nasdaq 11,890.93 up by 300.15
S&P 500 3,510.45 up by 67.01

10 Year Yield: up at 0.78%

Oil: down at $38.51

U.S. Presidential Election 2020: TOO CLOSE 2 CALL

By: Economic & Finance Report

The USA Presidential Elections 2020 is in a dead heat, the stakes could not be higher. Only a few states are now the determining factor in deciding the next U.S. President, for the next 4 years. Both candidates, President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden need 270 electoral college votes to become the president of the United States.

There have been a pendulum of states going back and forth for each candidate, and a few “swing states” will be the determining factor on who becomes the next president of the United States of America. Stay Tuned-SB

Image Credit: ABCNews.com

28 October 2020

1) The White House considers the chances for passing a pandemic aid deal before the elections as being slim. The prime reason is considered to be House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi who is seeking too much, including stimulus checks for immigrants who are in the United States illegally. The White House has said aid to state and local governments has been another sticking point, while Democrats cite the lack of a national coronavirus testing plan. President Trump supports another major relief package, but he and Pelosi have been unable to reach a deal. America is facing a resurgence of Covid-19 cases, with 36 out of the 50 states seeing an increase for at least two weeks in a row. Deaths from the respiratory disease have also more than doubled in seven states.

2) Pacific Ethanol (NASDAQ: PEIX) transformed its business from a low-margin maker of gasoline additives into a high-margin producer of alcohol for disinfectants and hand sanitizers, a result of the coronavirus which is the reason Pacific Ethanol stock soared more than 1,300% over the past year. Pacific Ethanol announced it will change its name to reflect its new corporate focus on the production of specialty alcohols and essential ingredients for the fight against the coronavirus. The company also decided to release a large secondary stock offering which appears to have depressed its stock price. Additionally, for a company whose production has been largely for gas tanks, the decrease in gasoline demand has shrunk its historic market.

3) The troubles brought onto American airlines by the pandemic isn’t limited to just U.S. air carriers. The Saudia airline faces claims over 50 leased Airbus planes with additional demands for other damages and costs, as documents seen by Reuters show. Fifty aircraft, which account for a third of Saudia’s fleet, worth around $8.2 billion dollars, were bought by International Airfinance Corporation (IAFC) and leased to Saudia. But apparently Saudia has failed to pay basic rent, after it sought to reduce its rent payments while also engaging in un-authorised and un-notified engine and part swaps. Therefore, IAFC is seeking restitution in London courts.

4) Stock market closings for – 27 OCT 20:

Dow 27,463.19 down 222.19
Nasdaq 11,431.35 up 72.41
S&P 500 3,390.68 down 10.29

10 Year Yield: down at 0.78%

Oil: up at $38.93

30 April 2020

1) Experts are speculating on the interest rates going negative in the near future, something that President Trump wants. Negative interest rates have been a reality in the EU (European Union), with studies showing that investors do not significantly increase their equity holdings as interest rates decline. But when the rates go negative, they start increasing their equity holdings significantly. This in turn is a big boost to the stock market. Interest rates are an excellent predictor of long range growth potential, today’s level reflecting the markets expectation of sustained low future growth.

2) Larry Kudlow, the top White House economist, is calling for stimulate measures before a slowdown of the economy. Measures include tax breaks such as payroll tax holiday and deregulation of small businesses. This is in anticipation of growth in the second quarter worse than in the first, which shrank 4.8%. Additionally, he supports a second stimulus package to create incentives to grow in the medium and long term. Also more investment in infrastructure should be included.

3) After posting a massive first quarter loss, Boeing has announced they will slash staff and production of about 16,000 people or about 10% of its personnel. Demand for air travel evaporated because of the coronavirus, so Boeing is drastically scaling back production of the two widebody passenger jets, its 787 Dreamliner and the 777. Boeing lost $1.7 billion dollars, while shutting down its factories, because of the pandemic, added another $137 million dollar lost.

4) Stock market closings for – 29 APR 20:

Dow 24,633.86 up 532.31
Nasdaq 8,914.71 up 306.98
S&P 500 2,939.51 up 76.12

10 Year Yield: up at 0.63%

Oil: up at $15.35

6 February 2020

1) For the first time in six years, the U.S. trade deficit fell as the White House’s trade war with China curbed imports. The trade deficit dropped 1.7% to $616.8 billion dollars last year with steep decline in industrial materials and supplies, consumer goods and other goods. The trade deficit for goods with Mexico jumped to a record high of $101.8 billion dollars last year, with the European Union reaching an all time high of $177.9 billion dollars.

2) The Ford Motor Company is posting a$1.7 billion dollar loss and anticipates a weak forecast for 2020. General Motors is also reporting poor performance for 2019 and anticipates flat profits for 2020. Both Ford and GM’s troubles are in part from slaking sales in China, in particular with the economic slowdown in China from the coronavirus pandemic. The major competitor to the duet auto makers, Tesla, is suffering from the coronavirus closing of its Shanghai factory which builds its Model 3 sedans.

3) Macy’s, another major world renowned retailer, is experiencing the brick-and-mortar decline of other major traditional retailers. The chain is closing 125 of its stores, in addition to the 100 stores it has already closed, and cutting about 2,000 corporate jobs. Their strategy is to exit weaker shopping malls and focus towards opening smaller format stores in strip centers. But even with these changes, the future of Macy’s is abysmal. The company has lost market share in core categories such as apparel, as fewer shoppers take trips to malls, preferring on line shopping.

4) Stock market closings for – 5 FEB 20:

Dow                 29,290.85    up    483.22
Nasdaq             9,508.68    up      40.71
S&P 500            3,334.69    up      37.10

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.65%

Oil:    up   at    $51.17

30 September 2019

1) The White House is considering putting limits on U.S. investment in China, which would aggravate the protracted trade dispute between the two largest economies in the world. Advisers are discussing ways to limit U.S. investors’ portfolio flows into China, including limiting all U.S. investment in China. One possible method being considered is to delist Chinese companies on the U.S. stock exchanges thereby limiting American’s exposure to the Chinese market.

2) Alexandria Ocasio-Cortex, the New York Representative, announced a comprehensive anti-poverty bill that would provide new protections for tenants, children, immigrants and other Americans who are increasingly vulnerable to the high cost of inequality. One part of the bill is a tenant rights bill which would significantly expand federal housing policy. This would include a cap on annual rent increases or rent control.

3) General Motors has reversed itself and reinstated health care benefits to its striking workers, as a result of sever criticism from politicians and social media. Normal procedure in strikes is for the cost of health care to shift from the company to the union. The strike of 49,000 GM workers has shut down 30 GM plants across the nation for nearly two weeks. The GM plant in Mexico has been forced to close due to parts shortages as a result of the strike.

4) Stock market closings for – 27 SEP 19:

Dow              26,820.25    down    70.87 
Nasdaq           7,939.63    down    91.03
S&P 500          2,961.79    down    15.83

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.68%

Oil:    $56.18

4 June 2019

1) The electric car manufacturer Tesla has been getting significant revenues by selling credits to other car makers who need to offset sales of polluting vehicles. General Motors and Fiat-Chrysler disclosed that they have reached agreements to buy federal greenhouse gas credits from Tesla. These companies want to bank their green credits for use later when emission rules get tougher, especially if democrats regain the White House.

2) Bond yields are dropping at the fastest rate since th 2008 global financial crisis, in anticipation that the Federal reserve will cut interest rates to counter the fallout from the trade tensions. The two year Treasury yield has fallen for five straight days. This is likely to have damaging effects on business confidence as businesses become more concerned with future growth.

3) The U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index fell by more than 2 points in May, the lowest level since September 2009, 6 points over the last year. This index reflects a drop in new orders or postponement of orders due to the uncertainty of the economic future. Manufactures are having to hold selling prices lower because of diminished sales, which in turn is squeezing profits.

4) 3 JUN 19 Stock market closings:

Dow             24,819.78   up            4.74
Nasdaq          7,333.02   down   120.13
S&P 500         2,744.45   down        7.61

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.08%

Oil:    down   at    $52.85