10 September 2020

1) The renowned Mall of America announced plans to lay off and furlough hundreds of employees. Located in Bloomington, Minn. the shopping center will permanently lay off 211 workers across various departments at the end of the month with an additional 178 workers to remain on furlough beyond the end of September. The Mall employs about 1,000 workers. Like most other malls in America, the Mall of America has suffered severely from the pandemic and need for social distancing. The malls across America have suffered a decline in recent years as people’s shopping habits and revenues decline. The Mall of America has been delinquent on its $1.4 billion dollar mortgage for May, June and July, and in turn some of its 500 retail tenants are unable to pay rent or having skip out on lease obligations.

2) Federal report warns of the threat from climate change to the economy. The report considers there are consequences that can create chaos in the financial system and disrupt the American economy. It’s considered that climate change poses a major risk to the stability of the U.S. financial system to sustain the American economy, that jobs, income and opportunity are at stake. This is just another indication of the increasing difficulty and expense of keeping individuals in a high technology society. The report makes 53 recommendations for dealing with the climate risks.

3) With the start up of college and return to campus life, there has been a sharp increase in coronavirus cases stemming from universities. For instance, the University of Tennessee has more than 2,100 students and staff members quarantined for Covid-19. As of Monday the university has 600 active cases of Covid-19. Of the 2,100 quarantined cases, about half are on-campus students and the other half off-campus. The surge is blamed on reckless behavior by a small portion of the students, especially traditional college parties with close personal contact. Many other American universities are having similar experience such as the University of Notre Dame, and North Carolina State. Some universities have implemented curfews, restrictions on visitors and even lockdowns of fraternities and sororities.

4) Stock market closings for – 9 SEP 20:

Dow 27,940.47 up 439.58
Nasdaq 11,141.56 up 293.87
S&P 500 3,398.96 up 67.12

10 Year Yield: up at 0.70%

Oil: up at $37.78

24 April 2020

1) The American unemployed continue to climb with an additional 4.4 million for last week. This brings the five week total of more than 26 million workers now unemployed in America, or about 16% of the labor force. Nearly one in six workers have lost their jobs in the last few weeks. But because of lags in the reporting system, these numbers don’t fully show the extent of the problem. With people needing money to pay rents, mortgage, buy food and pay utilities, state governments are facing increasing pressure to retract the ‘shelter at home’ orders and forced closing of businesses, despite dangers of virus flare-ups. Experts warn such moves could undo all the containment that’s been accomplished at the economic cost of the last five weeks. To make things worst, layoffs are expected to continue, that we have not reached the unemployed plateau yet. State, county and city workers may form the next wave of layoffs as tax revenues needed to pay salaries plunge from the pandemic.

2) The clothing retailer Gap, has warned that its existing cash reserves may not be enough to continue operations, something that mirrors the predicament of so many American businesses, especially small businesses. The company says it must take further actions to find liquidity over the next twelve months, including job cuts and new debt financing. The chain has stopped paying rent for its stores, thereby amassing an additional debt of $115 million dollars. Its stock has fallen nearly 60% this year.

3) The coronavirus pandemic is spawning another economic consequence- lawsuits! Carnival Corp. is facing suits from several passengers who claimed they weren’t warned of the high risk from virus onboard ships. Wells Fargo, Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase and US Bancorp are being sued by small businesses who missed out on coronavirus rescue loans. Even universities are threaten with lawsuits for reimbursements of tuition, fees and housing. Judging from past disasters, it’s expected that more lawsuits will emerge in waves, as people seek someone to blame for their misfortunes while opportunistic attorneys capitalize on the crisis.

4) Stock market closings for – 23 APR 20:

Dow 23,515.26 up 39.44
Nasdaq 8,494.75 down 0.63
S&P 500 2,797.80 down 1.51

10 Year Yield: down at 0.61%

Oil: up at $16.72

8 April 20

1) The dizzying swings in the stock market has made a mockery of efforts to forecast the market. This phenomena graphically reveals the high degree of uncertainty prevalent in the world today. One day, markets are up by one or two thousand points, next day down by the same amount as people are unable to decide if the economy will grow or contract. Market experts are unable to decide if the economic downturn is a short impulse from the coronavirus, or a long term event covering months or even years. One major component in seeing the economic future is the question of how many small businesses will fail during the shutdown, most from lack of cash. A high number of failures could drag the rest of businesses down.

2) American colleges and universities are also suffering financial problems from the coronavirus shutdown. Institutions are scrambling to close deep budget holes from loss of tuition and fees, refunds for student housing, dining and parking from students forced to leave school. Some have had a huge share of their reserves wiped out with some schools are facing financial collapse. Some face a double loss with their reserves in the stock market. To add to college’s worry, is the question of how many students will return this fall if the shut down is over. Furthermore, surveys show significant number of highschool seniors planning to take a year off before continuing their education, another loss of revenues for colleges.

3) Because of the virus shut down, demand for gasoline in America has collapsed. Sales are down 46.5% from last year. The same sharp decline in gasoline sales has been seen in Europe with demand for gasoline down as much as 85%. With big box retailers slowing and automakers shutting down, a slowdown is expected in the next few weeks.

4) Stock market closings for – 7 APR 20:

Dow 22,653.86 down 26.13
Nasdaq 7,887.26 down 25.98
S&P 500 2,659.41 down 4.27

10 Year Yield: up at 0.74%

Oil: down at $24.26

5 December 2019

1) The oil cartel OPEC and their allies are being called on for dramatic action to avert a crash in oil prices. They are being called on to cut production of crude oil to keep oil prices high, while the world is facing a looming flood of oil from American production. If they don’t restrict production, the world faces an oversupply of about 800,000 barrels per day in the first half of 2020.

2) Businesses are under a constant threat of ransomware attacks with increasing consequences of financial loses. Every business or organization from large corporations, health care systems, universities and small businesses are at risk. These targets must use defensive methods, but those costs time, money and resources to do. The FBI estimates there are several thousand ransomware attacks each day.

3) Stock market closings for – 4 DEC 19:

Dow             27,649.78    up    146.97
Nasdaq          8,566.67    up      46.03
S&P 500         3,112.76    up      19.56

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.78%

Oil:    up   at    $56.32