16 June 2020

1) The markets sank Monday, down by 762 points, when the news of the Feds bond-buying plan became known, reversing the selling to buying which raised the Dow up 150 points. The downward slide was from fears of a second round of the Convid-19 virus with the possibility of more economic damage. The plan is for the Federal Reserve to buy individual corporate bonds, on top of the exchange traded funds it is already buying. This is a move to ease credit conditions to further stimulate the economy. The program can buy up to $750 billion dollars worth of corporate credit, which the Feds can buy on the secondary market, individual bonds that have maturities of five or less years. Bonds is how corporations typically fund their operations and expansion using debt, and this program will ease debt for corporations allowing them to grow more and provide jobs.

2) The oil giant BP (British Petroleum) has signaled to investors that the economic shock of the pandemic will reverberate for years. This in turn means less gas and oil needed by the world in the future. The company is expected to write down $17.5 Billion dollars of its oil and gas holdings this next quarter, meaning they are worth less in the future than what they are worth today. The coronavirus pandemic has caused steep declines in demand for gas and oil worldwide, and this is expected to last for a number of years. This write down is in the approximate class of the Deepwater horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, which was $32 billion dollars.

3) Britain’s Brexit, the planned exit of Britain from the European Union, has been overshadowed by the world wide pandemic, but nevertheless Brexit trade talks have continued. But the talks have reached an impasse. Britain left the union at the end of January, but had not reached agreements on traded with the other European countries. Although Britain left the union, the two economies have continued operating as before Brexit, so there has been little changed in trading. But this is only to the end of the year, and with Britain a major trader of goods with Europe, it’s important to reach agreements before that time comes. One major point of contention is how future disagreements will be adjudicated or arbitrated.

4) Stock market closings for – 15 JUN 20:

Dow 25,763.16 up 157.62
Nasdaq 9,726.02 up 137.21
S&P 500 3,066.59 up 25.28

10 Year Yield: unchanged at 0.70%

Oil: up at $37.07

23 January 2020

1) Present Trump has renewed his threats to impose tariffs on imported cars from Europe, citing that the European Union is even more difficult to do business with than China. His comments signals he is turning his attention to renegotiating trade deals with the bloc. Automobiles have been at the center of trade tensions for the past couple of years.

2) The millennials own just 4% of American real estate by value, much less than the 32% which baby boomers owned. This comparison is with approximately the same media age of the two groups, meaning the millennials are far behind the baby boomers economically. While millennials may close that gap in the next four years, it’s unlikely they will reach 20% ownership, still far behind the baby boomers.

3) There is a rash of retail store closings after the holiday season, due to sales slump. Fashion retailer Express is closing 91 stores, Bed Bath & Beyond is closing 60 , Schurman Retail Group is closing its Papyrus and American Greeting stores for a total of 254 locations in the next four to six weeks. Express is the latest in a serious of fashion retailers to close, part of the struggle of malls to compete in the new retail arena. Last year, retailers Forever 21 filed for bankruptcy, with Charlotte Russe and Payless ShoeSource going out of business.

4) Stock market closings for – 22 JAN 20:

Dow            29,186.27    down       9.77
Nasdaq         9,383.77          up     12.96
S&P 500        3,321.75          up       0.96

10 Year Yield:       unchanged   at    1.77%

Oil:         down   at    $56.17

US-CHINA PHASE 1 TRADE AGREEMENT : SIGNED……

By: Economic & Finance Report

On January 15, 2020 (Wednesday), the USA and China signed the first phase of the US-China Trade Agreement. The first phase of the agreement, has China purchasing 200 billion dollars worth of goods and services, within the next 2 years from the United States .

The United States will then reduce the tariffs of $120 billion dollars worth of Chinese products, which is currently at 15% to be reduced to 7.5%. Chinese exports will then achieve over $260 billion dollars in the 2020 fiscal year.

The agreement provides more and better protection for American companies. American companies have discontent in China stealing intellectual property and trade stipulations. Phase 1, allows US banks to operate in China, while also enabling penalties for bad business and financial practices; instituted by US banks while operating in China.

So far the Phase 1 deal; seems to be a success as global markets have reacted positively to the signing of the USA-China Phase 1 Agreement. -SB

14 January 2020

1) Ford Motor Company’s sales in China has declined for the third straight year, falling by 26.1%. The company has been trying to revive sales in China after the decline started in 2017 and plans to introduce thirty new models in the next three years, with a third being electric models. General Motors has also experienced a decline in sales of 15% this last year.

2) One of the largest suppliers of parts to Boeing’s 737 MAX, Spirit AeroSystems, is laying off 2,800 workers. Based in Wichita Kansas, will eliminate 20% of its workforce. Smaller layoffs will happen at its facilities in Tulsa and McAlester, with half its annual sales from parts for the 737 MAX. Since last February, Spirit’s stock has fell from a high of $100 a share to $71.50 on news of the layoffs.

3) Expectations are that the U.S. will remove China from its list of currency manipulators two days before the signing of initial U.S. – China trade agreement. Part of the agreement is that both nations will not devalue its currency to gain a competitive advantages of exports. Labeling China a currency manipulator was viewed largely as a symbolic action.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 JAN 20: Stocks are up 495% in the past decade.

Dow             28,907.05    up    83.28
Nasdaq          9,273.93    up    95.07
S&P 500         3,288.13    up    22.78

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.85%

Oil:    down   at    $58.12

23 December 2019

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

2) Automaker Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles is making an all out push to clear out tens of thousands of vehicles which their dealerships have not ordered, because their new data driven production strategy has swelled their inventory. The automaker is offering its most aggressive discounts since the financial crisis to sell certain 2019 models under their Dodge, Jeep and Ram brands. Their sales staff is working overtime to sell more than 70,000 unassigned cars in December to their 2,400 dealerships.

3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 DEC 19:

Dow                28,455.09    up    78.13
Nasdaq             8,924.96    up    37.74
S&P 500            3,221.22    up     15.85

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.92%

Oil:    down   at    $60.36

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

2) Automaker Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles is making an all out push to clear out tens of thousands of vehicles which their dealerships have not ordered, because their new data driven production strategy has swelled their inventory. The automaker is offering its most aggressive discounts since the financial crisis to sell certain 2019 models under their Dodge, Jeep and Ram brands. Their sales staff is working overtime to sell more than 70,000 unassigned cars in December to their 2,400 dealerships.

3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.

25 November 2019

1) American retailers, such as Home Depot are facing a new crime wave driven by drugs and fueled by the opioid crisis. Known as organized retail crime, people steal for crime rings in exchange for cash they can buy drugs with. The stolen merchandise is then resold at pawnshops, online or directly to a buyer. Worst yet, the thieves are using violence against store employees who try to stop the open theft, even using guns and knifes. The store is left to just stand and watch as thieves roll shopping carts of merchandise out the door to sell for drugs.

2) The tuna supplier Bumble Bee Foods announced they are filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection to be purchased by its largest creditor FCF Fishery, for $925 million dollars. Bumble Bee’s debt burden has forced the bankruptcy, which in turn was caused by a $25 million dollar fine for forming a cartel with Chicken of the Sea and Starkist to fix prices. The fine was levied by the Department of Justice. Additionally, the popularity of packaged tuna has been declining with a 42% per capita drop over the last 30 years.

3) There are growing fears that phase one of the China-American trade deal may not get signed before the additional tariffs take effect in mid-December. Phase one would not eliminate tariffs on either side, instead would address issues of intellectual property and financial services access including sizeable purchases by China of American agricultural products. Phase one is considered a starting point for resolving trade differences.

4) Stock market closings for – 22 NOV 19:

Dow          27,875.62    up    109.33
Nasdaq       8,519.88    up      13.67
S&P 500      3,110.29    up         6.75

10 Year Yield:    unchanged   at    1.77%

Oil:    up   at    $57.93

ALIBABA CLOBBERS EARNINGS, MORE GROWTH EXPECTED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Image Photo Credit: Asia.Nikkei.com

By: Economic & Finance Report

Alibaba Holdings LTD (BABA) surpassed earnings expectations. The Asian e-commerce giant, stated that their retail business and their cloud business, were huge components in their earnings viability, while also beating estimates.

Their retail commerce business (BABA) spurned over $14 billion USD in revenue, while thier (BABA) cloud business did over $1 billion USD in revenue. At the end of the Friday Oct. 31, 2019 business day, BABA’s stock was up over 3%. Not a bad day for a major Chinese e-commerce business..SB

7 October 2019

1) As part of its restructuring plan, HP announced they will cut about 7,000 to 9,000 jobs, resulting in an estimated savings of about $1 billion dollars. While HP expects to incur labor and non-labor cost of about $1 billion dollars, they expect to generate at lease $3 billion dollars of free cash flow. As of 31 October 2018, HP had world wide employment of about 55,000 workers.

2) Consumer spending has been the bright spot in an economy showing signs of weakening on multiple fronts, in particular manufacturing. Economists worry if consumer spending will continue to prop up the economy, saying that the up coming Christmas season will be a test. Issues such as trade, interest rates, global risk factors and political rhetoric are where confidence can be eroded by deterioration of these items.

3) The new Costco in Shanghai China reports membership of more than 200,000 as compared to an American average of 68,000 per store. Costco will open a second Shanghai location in early 2021. The first day opening, the store was so swamped with customers, that the doors had to be closed for four hours to limit the number of people inside to safe limits.

4) Stock market closings for – 4 OCT 19:

Dow                  26,573.72    up    372.68
Nasdaq               7,982.47    up    110.21
S&P 500              2,952.01    up      41.38

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.52%

Oil:    up   at    $53.01

4 October 2019

1) MGM Resorts has reached agreement with families of victims who were killed in the October 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas. The settlement for the 2,500 family victims will be almost $800 million dollars with the agreement that all pending litigation against MGM will be dismissed. The shooting left 58 dead while wounding hundreds of others.

2) Soon to be implemented, tariffs will make imports more expensive for Americans, such as Scotch and Irish whiskies, Parmesan cheese and French wine. The tariffs will be on $7.5 billion dollars of European imports. Further tariffs are threaten over aircraft subsidies by the European Union, coming at a time when economies have been hurt by the US-China trade war. The World Trade Organization has ruled America can impose tariffs because the European Union has failed to abide by earlier ruling of Airbus subsidies.

3) The service-sector activity in the U.S. slowed to its weakest pace in three years this September. This is another sign that the U.S. economy may be weakening where the services sector accounts for more than two thirds of economic activity. The non-manufacturing index fell to 52.6 last month, which was the lowest reading since August 2016 and far below the 55.3 expectations.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 OCT 19:

Dow                 26,201.04    up    122.42
Nasdaq              7,872.26    up      87.02
S&P 500             2,910.63    up      23.02

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.54%

Oil:    down   at    $52.34

1) There are expectations that global growth will slow this year to a rate that can become a financial crisis. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development claims new data showing the US-China trade dispute is increasingly threatening the outlook of the two largest economies as well as others. Furthermore, the uncertainty from the Brexit and a possible crash out would further aggravate economic growth in the European sector.

2) Saudi Arabia is avoiding a global oil crisis by using the crude it holds in reserve until production can be fully restored. The Saudi’s claim necessary repairs will be completed in two to three weeks, thus restoring production levels prior to the attack. However, oil experts are skeptical that these repairs can be done in such a short period of time. This uncertainty is due in part from Saudi Arabia’s lack of transparence of their oil operations.

3) Good news for home owners, sales of used homes rose to its highest in more than a year, with the median price up 4.7% from last year to $278,200. This home sale bonanza is fueled in part by the low interest rates now available and by income gains. However, there are fears of a global economic slow down darkening this rosy picture in the near future. Presently, it would take 4.1 months to sell all the available houses, with realtors considering anything below a five month supply a tight market.

4) Stock market closings for – 19 SEP 19:

Dow              27,094.79    down   52.29 
Nasdaq           8,182.88          up     5.49
S&P 500          3,006.79          up     0.06

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.77%

Oil:    $58.68