3 August 2020

1) Another sign of how badly the pandemic has wrecked the world economy is the huge losses that Exxon Mobil and Chevron have reported for the second quarter. The losses were even worst than Wall Street expected. Both stocks were the biggest losers in the Dow. Exxon lost $1.1 billion dollars with Chevron losing $8.3billion dollars. Oil is a principle component in a modern economy, and therefore a strong indicator of how an economy is doing.

2) Another internet satellite system has been approved by the FCC (Federal Communications Commission). Amazon’s Project Kuiper is a network in the sky of 3,236 satellites which will provide broadband internet access with the restriction that it doesn’t interfere with previously authorized satellite ventures. Amazon plans to invest $10 billion dollars in the project to compete with SpaceX, OneWeb and Telesat systems. Service will begin once the first 578 satellites have been launched. It’s expected service will begin sometime before 2026.

3) High tech giant Google has announced they are formally extending work from home until the summer of 2021. The extension will affect about 200,000 employees to include contractors and full time workers, including operations off shore. Most of the other tech companies have set at home working until the end of this year, but Google’s announcement fuels speculation if other companies will follow suit and extend their at home work schedule. Google was one of the first companies to implement work at home policy in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

4) Stock market closings for – 31 JUL 20:

Dow 26,428.32 +114.67 +0.44%
Nasdaq 10,745.28 +157.46 +1.49%
S&P 500 3,271.12 +24.90 +0.77%

10 Year Yield: 0.54% -0.00 —

Oil: down at $40.43

17 JUL 2020

1) Looming in the wings of the pandemic crisis is another major crisis . . . and epidemic of evictions. With the unemployment rate still more than 10% and eviction protections lapsing across America, housing experts expect millions of Americans to lose their homes in the coming months. For millions of Americans, the housing situation was already precarious before the pandemic. Many are paying large percentages of their monthly incomes toward rent, but don’t have enough to cover an unexpected expense of just a few hundred dollars. With insufficient money from unemployment, people are facing living on the streets during 100 degree plus temperatures, hurricane season and possibly freezing weather if the problem continues. This would also mean increased exposure to the Convid-19 virus.

2) A bright spot in the economy is that retail sales rose again for the second straight month as shoppers slowly trickle back into stores. But with conronavirus cases on the rise, this could be short lived. Sales increased 7.5% for June, from May, better than the 5% estimated by economists. Sales were driven by clothing, electronics and appliances as well as home furnishing. Still, foot traffic through stores is way down, people coming in with specific items to consider buying instead of just browsing. So far this year, 4,000 stores are closing permanently with as many as 25,000 expected by the end of the year. Last year, there were 9,302 store closing.

3) The traditional investing axiom of 60/40 portfolios is coming into question. This is the mix of 60% stocks and 40% bonds, which is generally considered the best risk minimizing strategy for individuals to use in building their fortune. But with Treasury yields now hovering around zero, and expected to stay there for years, those gains are in doubt. For decades, this strategy has given the best returns with the least risk in times of volatile markets. Consequently, investors are scrutinizing the strategy as maybe out of date in a changing economy.

4) Stock market closings for – 16 JUL 20:

Dow 26,734.71 down 135.39
Nasdaq 10,473.83 down 76.66
S&P 500 3,215.57 down 10.99

10 Year Yield: down at 0.61%

Oil: down at $40.80

AFRICAN AMERICANS BENEFIT LEAST ECONOMICALLY FROM THE STOCK MARKET RALLYING.

By: Economic & Finance Report

With the national protests occurring in the United States. There has long been an issue about the income inequality among minorities and investment inequalities among minorities, especially African Americans.

Analytics and data collected from The Federal Reserve indicate that over 60% of white families have stock share holdings while only 30% of black families have stock holdings. Indicated is that only a third of African American families are seeing the benefits from the stock market rally, currently occurring.

The wealth gap between minorities and white families is also very wide. Median white family net worth is $171,000 while African American family median net worth is approx $18,000. These wealth gaps tend to have economical effect on minority and black families as they are not given a fighting chance to improve financially and economically amongst their counterparts. -SB

Source: Yahoo Finance; Federal Reserve Survey Consumer Finances (2016); Image Source: Vox.com

19 May 2020

1) The managing director Kristalina Georgieva of the IMF (International Monetary Fund) says the Fund is likely to revise downward its forecast of a 3% contraction of the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) for 2020. In turn, this will most likely cause a revision of the IMF’s forecast for a partial recovery of 5.8% in 2021. This means a longer time for a full economic recovery from the virus crisis. The IMF had forecasted that the business closures to slow the virus would throw the world into the deepest recession since the 1930’s Great Depression.

2) Gold markets have risen to their highest in more than seven years, a result of the Federal Reserve saying stocks and asset prices could suffer a significant decline as a result of the coronavirus crisis. The economic recovery could go to the end of 2021, depending on the arrival of an effective vaccine. Owning gold is considered to be a safe haven in times of economic turmoil, able to retain its value when other assets are sinking in value. Other precious metals such as silver, platinum and palladium are also experiencing a swing upward in price, but since these are commodities, their value may drop in a slower economy and reduced industrial demand.

3) The price of oil is above $30 a barrel for the first time in two months as U.S. and other country producers continue to cut production in order to restore the balance of the oil market. The world wide shut downs from the virus has drastically reduced the demand for oil world wide, with the world’s storage capacity quickly filling to maximum capacity, and for a time, producers having to pay to have their oil production removed. While the price of oil is still too low to salvage the shale oil (fracking) business in America, it still bodes well for the U.S. and world economies. Nevertheless, expectations are it will be well into the next year for the oil markets to be fully restored. Oil futures contracts that are due in June, show few signs of a resulting plunge in oil prices as when the May contracts came due and investors had to pay others to take their oil away.

4) Stock market closings for – 18 MAY 20:

Dow 24,597.37 up 911.95
Nasdaq 9,234.83 up 220.27
S&P 500 2,953.91 up 90.21

10 Year Yield: up at 0.74%

Oil: up at $32.21

2 April 2020

1) One developing economic crisis from the coronavirus is non-payment of rents. Renters tend to have less cash reserves than home owners, and for those renters not working, a large number will not be able to pay their monthly rent. Many are calling for the federal government to suspend rent payments until the crises is over, while others are calling for a rent boycotts to force landlords into accommodations. A wave of evictions could cause large numbers of people to fall below the poverty line, and worst yet greatly increase the number of homeless Americans.

2) Tuesday, President Trump warned of a very painful next two weeks, with projections of 100,000 to as much as 240,000 coronavirus deaths in the U.S. The news caused another shock to the markets with stocks again dropping shapely. With tremendous uncertainty, the markets are very unstable and therefore subject to sharp up and down swings. Both the Dow and S & P have had their worst first quarter in history. Oil too, continues with its low prices making for its worst month and quarter in history from both the coronavirus shutdown and the Saudi Arabia-Russia price war.

3) With the sudden surge in coronavirus patients, hospitals around America are running low on drugs needed to treat those patients. Some of the drugs are officially in shortage, with use of others skyrocketing and expected to quickly become into short supply. Also in short supply are antibiotics like azithromycind and antivirals like chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. Other drugs associated with patients using ventilators are quickly becoming scarce. Non prescription drugs such as vitamin C have seen a sharp increase in purchases.

4) Stock market closings for – 1 APR 20:

Dow 20,943.51 down 973.65
Nasdaq 7,360.58 down 339.52
S&P 500 2,470.50 down 114.09

10 Year Yield: down at 0.64%

Oil: up at $21.20

22 January 2020

1) The massive internet retailer Amazon has just been granted a patent for robots that drop off bunches of items on delivery routes. The robot has storage compartments where the customer comes out to the sidewalk, taps in the required security code on their smartphones that opens the door to a compartment so the person can get his package. The robot addresses the last mile or final fifty feet of package deliver. Such a robot also address the problem of porch pirates.

2) The mortgage companies seem to be reverting back to their old ways that triggered the financial crisis in 2008. This is the practice of giving large loans with small down payments to those with low FICO scores. FICO scores as low as 640 are getting mortgages of up to $2 million dollars, scores which were considered sub-prime prior to the 2008 economic near collapse.

3) The stock markets have pulled back from record high levels after the Center for Disease Control announced the first case of conronavirus in America. The highly contagious disease was discovered in a traveler coming from China. Particularly hit were stocks in casino and hotel companies, as well as airline companies and other companies involved with international travel. The Asian markets have also suffered a sudden drop which is blamed on the spreading virus.

4) Stock market closings for – 21 JAN 20:

Dow              29,196.04    down    152.06
Nasdaq          9,370.81    down      18.14
S&P 500         3,320.79    down        8.83

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.77%

Oil:    down   at    $58.37

TESLA’S MARKET VALUE SURPASSES FORD MOTORS & GENERAL MOTORS MARKET SHARE VALUE COMBINED!

Image Credit: NBCNews.com

By: Economic & Finance Report

Breaking News: Tesla Inc market value has now surpassed both legendary Ford Motors and General Motors company market values combined.

January 8, 2020 (Wednesday) Tesla Inc had a market cap of $89 billion, approx 2 more billion dollars then Ford Motors ($50 billion) and General Motors ($37 billion) combined.

Many of Tesla Inc’s attributes for rising market cap has to be with a profitable 3rd quarter the electrical auto maker had; also surpassing auto deliveries in the Chinese market, while also having its stock more then double over the past few months. These all seem to be contributing factors to its increased market cap currently.

With all the accolades Tesla has achieved, there are skeptics in the investment community who believe the company will not able to sustain cash flow nor provide more profitability in the next few years.

All this remains to be seen...SB

3 January 2020

1) Major drug makers such as Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi have plans to raise drug prices on more than 200 drugs in the United States. Nearly all of the price increases will be below 10%, with about half in the range of 4 to 6%. With soaring prescription drug prices a central issue in the presidential election, the move promises to bring the issue front and center to the American public.

2) The year’s first five days of stock markets is often an indicator of how the market will go for the year. On the first trading day of 2020, stocks jumped up, and if the next four secession are also upwards, stock traders anticipate another good year for the markets. Last year, 2019, started out the same way, rebounding from the worst December since the Great Depression.

3) OPEC’s output drop last month as several Persian Gulf producers stepped up their implementation of cutbacks. The reduced oil production is aimed at balancing global oil markets by reducing a new surplus forming. Cutbacks started in 2019, will continue in 2020 with more and deeper cuts expected for this year. Next meeting of the oil alliance is early March.

4) Stock market closings for – 2 JAN 20:

Dow            28,868.80    up    330.36
Nasdaq         9,092.19    up    119.59
S&P 500        3,257.85    up      27.07

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.88%

Oil:    down   at    $61.18

2 December 2019

1) Deere & Co., the famous manufacture of green and yellow tractors, reported lower earnings blaming trade tensions and poor weather in the U.S. farm belt. Last year’s difficult growing and harvesting conditions have made farmers cautious about investing in new farm equipment. Sales of the construction and forestry division are expected to be down by 10% to 15%, while agricultural is down 5% to 10% next year.

2) Texas oil explorers say predictions of shale production isn’t reflecting the industry’s slowdown. Producers are being starved of funding, stocks have plunged and little interest in public offerings, which may cause a downturn to be more enduring. Seeking to cut costs, drillers have laid off 1,000 workers. There are predictions that U.S. oil production growth will flatten as early as 2021. There is a rapid decline of shale well production, partly a result of placing wells too close together.

3) Global manufacturing has been dragging the world economy down this last year. Weak auto sales have added to the problem, with China’s auto market the worst with a 11% decline in sales. Slow auto sales have cut production at auto plants, with Audi cutting 7,500 jobs. U.S. dealerships are struggling to clear inventory for the new year, with a 12% rise in incentive spending in November, compared to a typical 4%.

4) Stock market closings for – 29 NOV 19:

Dow         28,051.41    down    112.59
Nasdaq      8,665.47    down      39.70
S&P 500     3,140.98    down      12.65

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.78%

Oil:    down   at    $55.42

4 November 2019

1) In their Friday report the U.S. economy added 128,000 jobs in October, a report considered to be very strong when many economist expected a gain of 75,000 jobs. Furthermore, job growth for September was revised upwards to 180,000 from 136,000 and August jobs up from 168,000 to 219,000 new jobs. The good news has spurred the stock markets up.

2) Alphabet, the parent company for Google, is acquiring Fitbit in an attempt to strengthen the search giant’s lineup of hardware and move further into the health market. The $2.1 billion dollar sale will strengthen Fitbit to complete against Apple. Fitbit has slowed since Apple introduced its smartwatch.

3) The U.S. dollar may be weakening with Citi latest projections that the dollar index could fall to as low as 85 as the Federal Reserve increases its balance sheet by purchasing more bond assets. The dollar usually weakens when bond yields fall. If the dollar index were to weaken to 85, the euro could strengthen to 1.21 which helps emerging market equities. Additionally, capital could flow to the Hong Kong market if the dollar weakens, making a lot of stocks very attractive.

4) Stock market closings for – 1 NOV 19:

Dow             27,347.36    up    301.13
Nasdaq          8,386.40    up      94.04
S&P 500         3,066.91    up      29.35

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.73%

Oil:    up   at    $56.23