9 September 2020

1) It’s not just American businesses who are feeling the effects of the Covid-19 crisis from reduced sales, American charities are also suffering a major drop in revenues for the same reason. With the recession straining household budgets, people are less able to contribute resulting in charities losing billions of dollars since this spring. Furthermore, traditional money raising methods such a concerts, festivals and galas have been canceled or scaled back to a fraction of their previous size. Many charities are now working to make the holiday season productive to make up shortfalls in revenue.

2) The repressiveness of the Hong Kong police was further exposed when police chased down and tackled a 12 year old girl in a shopping mall. Video footage of several police officers pinning the hapless girl down on the floor went viral worldwide with a public outcry over the excess use of force against political dissenters. The incident touched off angry shouts from onlookers. The police tactics are being criticized as an indiscriminate treatment of children who are not taking part in protest. The girl complained she felt targeted because of her age, that being young has become a crime in Hong Kong, further increasing concerns that the regime is targeting their young for repression.

3) The markets continue their decline after a five week winning streak as investors begin to worry about stretched valuations. The decline is being lead by the technology stocks, which has met a heavy decline for the tech-heavy Nasdaq. Remarks by President Donald Trump to decouple the U.S. economy from China further added to the market’s jitters. The high flying technology company Tesla has suffered it worst one day loss since March with an 18% drop in the price of its stock.

4) Stock market closings for – 8 SEP 20:

Dow 27,500.89 down 632.42
Nasdaq 10,847.69 down 465.44
S&P 500 3,331.84 down 95.12

10 Year Yield: down at 0.68%

Oil: oil down $36.62

28 Auguest 2020

1) The decay of the worlds airline industry is reaching out past the airline companies themselves, with jet engine maker Rolls-Royce announcing a $7 billion dollar lost for the first half of 2020. Rolls-Royce gets paid by the hours their engines are flown on airliners, and with the massive drop in air travel from the pandemic, the company’s revenues have drastically dropped leaving its survival in doubt. The company is being forced to sell assets to meet its cash needs, so they are reducing eleven of their locations to just 6, with the loss of 9,000 jobs. Stock dropped 9% on the news of reorganization which was already down 66% since the start of the virus crisis.

2) Not all of the retail industry is bleak news, with Abercombie & Fitch outperforming expectations in the second quarter. While the apparel company did lose ground in the last quarter, it performed better than analyst expected, with sales down by 17%, nevertheless their earnings per share made remarkable gains over last year. This is a result of aggressive costs reductions earlier in the quarter when the company slashed expenses by $200 million dollars by reducing salary expenditures and skipping dividends. Success in their e-commerce operations has also pushed up the revenues and promises to add more as people go to online for more of their shopping.

3) Another small indication that manufacturing is returning to America is Roche Holding AG plans to move its glucose testing strips manufacturing plant from Pueto Rico, where it has operated for about 40 years. The company is streamlining its operations by combining the plant with its other existing facilities. The move will cost 200 jobs in Peuto Rico, which has a number of other drug and medical device manufacturing plants.

4) Stock market closings for – 27 AUG 20:

Dow 8,492.27 up 160.35
Nasdaq 11,625.34 down 39.72
S&P 500 3,484.55 up 5.82

10 Year Yield: up at 0.75%

Oil: down at $42.96

2 July 2020

1) The airline industry is one of the hardest hit segments of the economy from the pandemic, with an estimated 36% drop in traffic this year. But the International Air Transport Association is warning that it could worsen with a 53% drop if boarder curbs on emerging market countries and the U.S. remain in place. The U.S. – EU (European Union) air travel market generates $29 billion dollars a year is threaten by the ban on non essential flights from the U.S. as the EU attempts to avoid an resurgence of the virus. Air travel was down over 90% for April and May, with little prospects for improvement in the near future, leaving the future of air carriers in doubt too.

2) The maker of electric automobiles Tesla has become the world’s most valuable automaker, surpassing Toyota’s for the first time on record. Tesla’s valuation is roughly $206.5 billion dollars compared with Toyota’s valuation of about $202 billion dollars. This underscores the vast investor enthusiasm for the automaker, which has yet to turn a profit on an annual basis. While it’s valuation exceeds Toyota, its car production of 103,000 cars lags far behind Toyota’s production of 2.4 million vehicles. The valuation comes from the stock in the company, with investors piling money in since there aren’t any other electric vehicles investments available, with Tesla stock soaring to $1,135 per share.

3) Electricity bills are set to surge this summer because of millions of Americans sheltering in place. This added demand will mean higher electricity costs for months to come. This will mean an additional $30 to $40 per month on electric bills in cities like New York and Philadelphia. Increases are anticipated to be highest for the northeast area of the country, decreasing when going westward. This comes when people’s finances are already stretched tight because of the coronavirus crisis.

4) Stock market closings for – 1 JUL 20:

Dow 25,734.97 down 77.91
Nasdaq 10,154.63 up 95.86
S&P 500 3,115.86 up 15.57

10 Year Yield: up at 0.68%

Oil: down at $39.71

24 April 2020

1) The American unemployed continue to climb with an additional 4.4 million for last week. This brings the five week total of more than 26 million workers now unemployed in America, or about 16% of the labor force. Nearly one in six workers have lost their jobs in the last few weeks. But because of lags in the reporting system, these numbers don’t fully show the extent of the problem. With people needing money to pay rents, mortgage, buy food and pay utilities, state governments are facing increasing pressure to retract the ‘shelter at home’ orders and forced closing of businesses, despite dangers of virus flare-ups. Experts warn such moves could undo all the containment that’s been accomplished at the economic cost of the last five weeks. To make things worst, layoffs are expected to continue, that we have not reached the unemployed plateau yet. State, county and city workers may form the next wave of layoffs as tax revenues needed to pay salaries plunge from the pandemic.

2) The clothing retailer Gap, has warned that its existing cash reserves may not be enough to continue operations, something that mirrors the predicament of so many American businesses, especially small businesses. The company says it must take further actions to find liquidity over the next twelve months, including job cuts and new debt financing. The chain has stopped paying rent for its stores, thereby amassing an additional debt of $115 million dollars. Its stock has fallen nearly 60% this year.

3) The coronavirus pandemic is spawning another economic consequence- lawsuits! Carnival Corp. is facing suits from several passengers who claimed they weren’t warned of the high risk from virus onboard ships. Wells Fargo, Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase and US Bancorp are being sued by small businesses who missed out on coronavirus rescue loans. Even universities are threaten with lawsuits for reimbursements of tuition, fees and housing. Judging from past disasters, it’s expected that more lawsuits will emerge in waves, as people seek someone to blame for their misfortunes while opportunistic attorneys capitalize on the crisis.

4) Stock market closings for – 23 APR 20:

Dow 23,515.26 up 39.44
Nasdaq 8,494.75 down 0.63
S&P 500 2,797.80 down 1.51

10 Year Yield: down at 0.61%

Oil: up at $16.72

14 February 2020

1) The furniture retailer Wayfair is reducing its workforce by 3% or 500 jobs. The online furniture retailer has more than 17,000 employees globally. The stock for the company has dropped more than 24% in the last twelve months. Wayfair has yet to post a profit and has been criticized for its high costs to run its business. Shipping items like sofas and coffee tables can be expensive, even more so where there’s returns.

2) Newspaper publisher conglomerate McClatchy has filed for bankruptcy. Owner of banner newspapers such as Miami Herald, Kansas City Star, Star-Telegram, News & Observer and Charlotte Observer, a total of thirty newspapers has seen its revenue slide downward for the last six years as readership of newspapers continues to decline, migrating to newer technologies for their news.

3) The U.S. national debt continues to increase at an ever increasing rate. The debt, adjusted for inflation, of 1900-1904 was $65.37 billion dollars. The debt after World War I (1919) was $329.06 billion dollars, a result of paying for the war. Then debt started dropping down to $319.35 billion dollars and by the 1929 stock market crash was down to $253.44 billion dollars, the start of the great depression. By the start of World War II, 1940, it was at $788.68 billion dollars, but at the end of the war (1945) skyrocketed to $3.69 trillion dollars, slowly drifting down to $533.19 billion dollars by 1975. But after that, it started growing again until today its now at $22.72 trillion dollars, 348 times the debt at the start of the twentieth century.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 FEB 20:

Dow 29,423.31 down 128.11
Nasdaq 9,711.97 down 13.99
S&P 500 3,373.94 down 5.51

10 Year Yield: down at 1 .62%

Oil: down at $51.52

14 January 2020

1) Ford Motor Company’s sales in China has declined for the third straight year, falling by 26.1%. The company has been trying to revive sales in China after the decline started in 2017 and plans to introduce thirty new models in the next three years, with a third being electric models. General Motors has also experienced a decline in sales of 15% this last year.

2) One of the largest suppliers of parts to Boeing’s 737 MAX, Spirit AeroSystems, is laying off 2,800 workers. Based in Wichita Kansas, will eliminate 20% of its workforce. Smaller layoffs will happen at its facilities in Tulsa and McAlester, with half its annual sales from parts for the 737 MAX. Since last February, Spirit’s stock has fell from a high of $100 a share to $71.50 on news of the layoffs.

3) Expectations are that the U.S. will remove China from its list of currency manipulators two days before the signing of initial U.S. – China trade agreement. Part of the agreement is that both nations will not devalue its currency to gain a competitive advantages of exports. Labeling China a currency manipulator was viewed largely as a symbolic action.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 JAN 20: Stocks are up 495% in the past decade.

Dow             28,907.05    up    83.28
Nasdaq          9,273.93    up    95.07
S&P 500         3,288.13    up    22.78

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.85%

Oil:    down   at    $58.12

10 December 2019

1) Celadon, a truckload carrier and American trucking giant, is slated to declare bankruptcy as early as December the 11 th. This may possibly be the largest truckload bankruptcy in history. Already, fuel cards for truck drivers are getting turned off, leaving truckers stranded in the field unable to get home without using their own money. As many as 3,200 truck drivers may find themselves stranded in addition to being without jobs. In the first half of 2019, about 640 trucking companies went bankrupt, triple the number from last year as freight volumes decline for 11 straight months. Celadon’s stock has gone from $20 a share down to 41 cents.

2) The Federal Government’s liquidity problem hasn’t gone away yet, even with hundreds of billions of dollars in new liquidity created out of thin air. The Feds will not know if there is enough money to cover repos, the short term loaning of money from bank to bank to cover short term cash shortages. If there is insufficient liquidity, then there’s the danger of a ‘lock up’ of American’s financial system.

3) Yes Bank Ltd. is expected to reject an offer of $1.2 billion dollars, more than half its planned $2 billion dollar capital raising. Instead, the company is turning to institutional investors to make up the shortfall. The bank would prefer to have institutions rather than individual investors in their fund raising. Yes Bank needs new investors in order to replenish its capital, which is now down to regulatory minimum as a result of bad loans.

4) Stock market closings for – 9 DEC 19:

Dow           27,909.60    down     105.46
Nasdaq        8,621.83    down       34.70
S&P 500       3,135.96    down         9.95

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.83%

Oil:    down   at    $58.87

22 November 2019

1) After HP rejected Xerox’s offer of $22 per share, Xerox is now threatening to go hostile with its $33.5 billion dollar buyout if HP does not agree to a friendly discussion before November the 25 th. Goldman Sachs & Co. set a $14 target price , the median price target on HP stock by 15 analysts is $20. HP had rejected Xerox first offer considering the combined companies would be saddled with outsized debt, and therefore not in the best interest of the shareholders.

2) The world economy is predicted to expand just 2.9% next year. The global economy is stuck in a rut which it wont exit unless governments revolutionize policies and how they invest, rather than just hope for a cyclical upswing. The biggest concern is that the deterioration of the outlook continues unabated, reflecting unaddressed structural changes. The risk of further escalation of world tensions is a serious concern.

3) General Motors and Fiat Chrysler are embroiled in a law suit with GM alleging that fiat Chrysler got an unfair business advantage by bribing officials of the United Auto Workers union. The suit alleges racketeering by paying millions in bribes to get concessions and gain advantages in three labor agreements with the UAW union. Details of the racketeering have been exposed in a federal probe of corruption in the union which resulted in multiple arrests starting in 2017.

4) Stock market closings for – 21 NOV 19:

Dow             27,766.29    down    54.80
Nasdaq          8,506.21    down    20.52
S&P 500         3,103.54    down      4.92

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.77%

Oil:    unchanged   at    $57.09

14 November 2019

1) The new streaming service Disney+ has surpassed ten million sign-ups since its launch Tuesday. In response Disney’s stock is up slightly while Netflix shares are down 1%. While there were technical problems connecting at first, that didn’t prevent customers from flooding the sign up page. The initial signup is for a free seven day trial, so it’s unknown how many will continue with the pay service.

2) In October, consumer prices rose the most in seven months as the price for gasoline was higher, along with medical treatment and recreation. But in general, inflation remained low and fairly stable, with consumer price index jumping 0.4%, primary from rising cost of energy. While gas prices surged upwards 3.7% in October, it’s still less than what Americans were paying a year ago.

3) The ever expanding corporate giant Google will offer personal checking accounts next year in partnership with Citigroup Inc and a small credit union at Stanford University. To be called Cache, it is intended to follow Apple Inc. and Facebook Inc into the financial industry. Google’s strategy is to deeply partner with banks and the financial system.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 NOV 19:

Dow                   27,783.59         up    92.10
Nasdaq               8,482.10    down      3.99
S&P 500              3,094.04         up      2.20

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.87%

Oil:    up   at    $57.38

8 November 2019

1) Bill Gates, the Microsoft co-founder, says he’s happy to pay his share of taxes, but expressed consternation over Elizabeth Warren’s proposals to tax America’s wealthy. He considers the presidential hopeful is not very open minded to consider his concerns. Warren’s wealth tax proposal is 2% annual levy on household wealth above $50 million dollars with an additional 1% tax on wealth above $1 billion dollars. She estimates this would cover 75,000 tax payers raising $2.6 to $2.75 trillion dollars over a ten years.

2) Stores are starting their Black Friday sales earlier this year, in part because the holiday shopping season is six days shorter. Retailer Target will begin online Black Friday sale on Thanksgiving morning, with stores opening their doors at 5 p.m. and remaining open through 1 a.m. the next day. On Black Friday, their stores open at 7 a.m.. Other retailers such as Walmart started their holiday shopping season last October.

3) Xerox is offering HP a takeover bid of $22 per share. The bid consists of 77% cash and 23% stock which would be $17 in cash and 0.137 Xerox shares for each HP share. If accepted, the deal would generate about $2 billion dollars in cost synergies with HP stock holders owning 48% of the company. HP has announced job cuts between 7,000 and 9,000 by the end of fiscal 2022. HP is worth $29 billion dollars and is more than three times the size of Xerox in terms of market cap.

4) Stock market closings for – 7 NOV 19:

Dow                 27,674.80    up    182.24
Nasdaq              8,434.52    up      23.89
S&P 500             3,085.18    up        8.40

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.93%

Oil:    up   at    $57.07