22 July 2020

1) China, with the second largest economy in the world, is steadily developing into a technological powerhouse that could upend the status quo. China’s ten year plan called “Made in China 2025”, has a principle goal for China to catchup, then surpass the West in various technological fields. Some consider this not only threatens the U.S. economy, but the world economy too. China has already declared they intend to be the dominate power in the world by 2050, and having the high ground in technology development is a key milestone in that quest.

2) Some consider that the stock market will likely head upwards to a new high, fueled by borrowing and money printing. With another stimulus package in the near future, it is ‘out of fashion’ to consider how the borrowed money will be paid back. The central banks, who are not elected, stand ready to print as much money as is wanted, no matter that historically this is how inflation is created and fuel. Example is the Weimar Republic (Germany) who induced their great wave of hyper inflation by printing massive amounts of money in the 1920’s, that lead the way for the Nazi’s to ascend to power. Other problems stemming from printing too much money is currency depreciation, difficulties borrowing, higher interest rates and social unrest. With other investments limited, the excess of money goes to the stock market, thus pushing the market up, and possibly into a bubble just waiting to pop!

3) The Congress remains busy crafting a second stimulus package with lots of debates what should and shouldn’t go in it, intending on having a deal worked out by the end of next week. However, this could go into August before a bill is ready to sign. A major point of contention is checks vs taxes. Should stimulus be checks like the $1,200 checks given out a few months?. If checks, then who gets them this time and how much? The other strategy is reducing payroll taxes, but this only helps those who are working. The Republicans are proposing a $1 trillion dollar relief strategy, while the Democrats propose a sweeping $3.5 trillion dollar plan. This would add to the $2.9 trillion dollar package already implemented early this year. As usual, everything is being done will little to no real analysis, instead relying on gut feelings of lawmakers in making the future of America.

4) Stock market closings for – 21 JUL 20:

Dow 26,840.40 up 159.53
Nasdaq 10,680.36 down 86.73
S&P 500 3,257.30 up 5.46

10 Year Yield: down at 0.61%

Oil: up at $41.58

4 June 2020

1) The stock market continues to climb, with some saying this signals the end of the recession. The S&P 500 has a return of 37.7% over the past 50 trading days, which is the largest 50 day rally in history. This rally is attributed to the quick response of the Federal Reserve, with a record $2 trillion dollar federal stimulus package. Another factor is the unlimited asset purchases by the Federal Reserve. While the shutdown depressed retail and airlines businesses, other parts of the economy saw a boost, such as Netflix, Amazon and Facebook. But there is still the record high of over 40 million workers idled by the pandemic, while the weakening in the Chinese’s economy coupled with the tensions between China and America could have a telling effect to the economic recovery.

2) There are fears of another round of layoffs in the later part of 2020, amid questions of where the economy will go in the next six to twelve months. Businesses are now reluctant to expand and hire new people, and may decide to contract thus being better able to weather economic hard times. There is also the unspoken problem of continued automation taking jobs as AI (Artificial Intelligence) and automation that experts predict will continual to sap jobs for the next decade. Automation gives companies an added advantage in surviving when the economy slows down, but a second wave of layoffs may trigger that slowdown.

3) The giant movie theater chain AMC has announced they doubt they can remain in business after the effects of the coronavirus shutdown. The company has problems with their liquidity, their ability to generate revenue and the timeline for reopening its theaters. The chain expects to lose $2.1 to $2.4 billion dollars for the first quarter, with the second quarter to be even worst. With all its theaters closed down, AMC is generating zero revenues. The major problem in reopening is having enough cash for operations until cash starts coming in again, and there is still questions of when theaters will be able to open again, especially if there are flare-ups of the virus.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 JUN 20:

Dow 26,269.89 up 527.24
Nasdaq 9,682.91 up 74.54
S&P 500 3,122.87 up 42.05

10 Year Yield: up at 0.76%

Oil: down at $36.75

15 May 2020

1) There are growing fears of another economic bomb about to go off. A popping of the housing bubble, much like the 2008 bubble collapse of the housing market, may happen as early as July. Last time, the collapse of the housing market played out over four years, but for the pandemic, the rate could be much faster, as is being seen with the stock market. Home sales have been languishing, especially with the treat of the virus and people reluctant to let strangers tour their homes with possible infections. It is estimated that 15% of homeowners will fall behind on their mortgages and this would mean more delinquencies than during the Great Depression. This in turn is causing a tightening of lending standards which could continue even after the crisis subsides. All this makes for a bubble waiting to burst.

2) Delta Air Lines Inc. has announced they plan to retire their fleet of eighteen Boeing 777 jumbo jets, and will replace them with Airbus SE aircraft. This constitutes another major financial blow to the beleaguered aircraft manufacture struggling with their 737 MAX troubles from over a year ago. Delta attributes the early retirement of their 777 fleet to the pandemic impact and the need to economize with newer fuel efficient aircraft.

3) Growing fears of a slow recovery is beginning to show cracks in the markets as investor’s anticipation of a quick recovery of the economy fades. For weeks, the hopes that the massive stimulus of $3 trillion dollars would spur a relatively quick recovery later in the year, coupled with a hot rebound of the stock market despite the massive numbers of layoffs, but now hope is fading. The growing economic uncertainty of just how many people can restart their lives amid the uncertainty of controlling the virus, plus the dangers of opening up too early, is causing investors to rethink their view of how the economy will fair in the next few months, even the next few years.

4) Stock market closings for – 14 MAY 20:

Dow 23,625.34 up 377.37
Nasdaq 8,943.72 up 80.55
S&P 500 2,852.50 up 32.50

10 Year Yield: down at 0.62%

Oil: up at $27.98

30 April 2020

1) Experts are speculating on the interest rates going negative in the near future, something that President Trump wants. Negative interest rates have been a reality in the EU (European Union), with studies showing that investors do not significantly increase their equity holdings as interest rates decline. But when the rates go negative, they start increasing their equity holdings significantly. This in turn is a big boost to the stock market. Interest rates are an excellent predictor of long range growth potential, today’s level reflecting the markets expectation of sustained low future growth.

2) Larry Kudlow, the top White House economist, is calling for stimulate measures before a slowdown of the economy. Measures include tax breaks such as payroll tax holiday and deregulation of small businesses. This is in anticipation of growth in the second quarter worse than in the first, which shrank 4.8%. Additionally, he supports a second stimulus package to create incentives to grow in the medium and long term. Also more investment in infrastructure should be included.

3) After posting a massive first quarter loss, Boeing has announced they will slash staff and production of about 16,000 people or about 10% of its personnel. Demand for air travel evaporated because of the coronavirus, so Boeing is drastically scaling back production of the two widebody passenger jets, its 787 Dreamliner and the 777. Boeing lost $1.7 billion dollars, while shutting down its factories, because of the pandemic, added another $137 million dollar lost.

4) Stock market closings for – 29 APR 20:

Dow 24,633.86 up 532.31
Nasdaq 8,914.71 up 306.98
S&P 500 2,939.51 up 76.12

10 Year Yield: up at 0.63%

Oil: up at $15.35

20 April 2020

1) The coronavirus pandemic and subsequent ‘sheltering in place’ is changing the American supermarkets. Online shopping of groceries had been somewhat of an awkward luxury service, that was growing ever so slowly, despite efforts of retailers to promote the new service. But the lockdown, stay at home orders have catapulted the service forward by up to a fifty times (not percent) increase in usage. Stores have been left struggling to meet the demand with many unable to keep up with that demand. When the pandemic ends, it will have forever changed the supermarket for many Americans, for once customers have used and got use to the service, then they will most likely continue using online grocery shopping, at least in part. But online shopping eliminates one of the big mainstays of modern supermarkets, the psychology of shopping with the browsing and impulse buying. The counter to this is automation which reduces the staff and labor cost of traditional retail stores, just as Amazon has done with dry goods.

2) The Chinese maker of driverless cars, Pony.ai, has launched a delivery service in Irvine California using its robot cars to deliver to people stuck at home from the virus. Teaming up with the e-commerce site Yamibuy, orders from Yamibuy get delivered to the customers homes. Each car can deliver between 500 to 700 packages a day. A year ago the company launched a robo-taxi service in Irvine, but with the ‘shelter in place’ order, their taxis were repurposed for deliveries.

3) Everyone is baffled over how the stock market continues to hold, even climbing, with what is happening today. For example-
a) Unemployment is now at 22 million and still climbing
b) Threat of large numbers of businesses going bankrupt
c) Recession starting, which most expect will last at least 12 months
d) Automation expected to eliminate up to 50% of jobs in 15 to 25 years
e) Global coronavirus cases surpass 1.5 million and continue growing
At a time when the markets would normally be crashing down from all the uncertainty, what is holding them up? Experts think because of the quick reaction of the government in passing the $2.2 trillion dollar economic stimulus waylaid market fears by showing something is being done. Also, Warren Buffett’s axiom, “Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy only when others are fearful.” Finally, the ‘social distancing’ measures seems to be controlling the virus, thereby lessening its economic effects in the long run.

4) Stock market closings for – 17 APR 20:

Dow 24,242.49 up 704.81
Nasdaq 8,650.14 up 117.78
S&P 500 2,874.56 up 75.01

10 Year Yield: up at 0.65%

Oil: down at $18.12

13 April 2020

1) As the administration considers efforts to restart the economy, economist are considering what a recovery will look like. Although there are widely differing opinions, most consider it will be a long slow process. While it was a great shock with the sudden stopping of businesses followed by the sudden massive unemployment, few consider that there will be a quick ‘snap back’ like with a light switch being snapped back on. The shutdown is causing fundamental shifts in the social-economic system. People’s shopping and ‘going-out’ habits such as restaurants, movies and sporting events is changing, which is also a change in spending habits. People are more reluctant to travel in high density such as airliners or cruise ships. Many small businesses will not survive this recession, and with half the businesses in America classed as small, there will be a significant change in the business environment, plus it will be a long time to reabsorb the massive unemployed, since automation will move in to fill the void. Finally, America’s economy is subject to being pulled down by the world economies, which few are expecting a strong comeback from, since so many were already weak before the coronavirus.

2) Consumer prices fell 0.4% in March, the largest monthly decline in five years. This is from the cost of things like traveling, gasoline, airfares and hotel rooms plunging. Energy cost is down 5.8% with gasoline prices down 10.5%. Food prices did continue rising. There are fears that the GDP will drop 30% or more adding to the economic bad news.

3) The wild gyrations of the stock market is leaving investors confused over what is happening. Stocks are going up when the future is filled with doubts and uncertainty, not a time when investors buy equities. The unemployment is quickly approaching, and may surpass 15% amidst fears of a huge economic contraction with a long term recession- a time when normally only fools would buy into the markets.

4) Stock market closings for – 10 APR 20:

Markets closed for Good Friday

8 April 20

1) The dizzying swings in the stock market has made a mockery of efforts to forecast the market. This phenomena graphically reveals the high degree of uncertainty prevalent in the world today. One day, markets are up by one or two thousand points, next day down by the same amount as people are unable to decide if the economy will grow or contract. Market experts are unable to decide if the economic downturn is a short impulse from the coronavirus, or a long term event covering months or even years. One major component in seeing the economic future is the question of how many small businesses will fail during the shutdown, most from lack of cash. A high number of failures could drag the rest of businesses down.

2) American colleges and universities are also suffering financial problems from the coronavirus shutdown. Institutions are scrambling to close deep budget holes from loss of tuition and fees, refunds for student housing, dining and parking from students forced to leave school. Some have had a huge share of their reserves wiped out with some schools are facing financial collapse. Some face a double loss with their reserves in the stock market. To add to college’s worry, is the question of how many students will return this fall if the shut down is over. Furthermore, surveys show significant number of highschool seniors planning to take a year off before continuing their education, another loss of revenues for colleges.

3) Because of the virus shut down, demand for gasoline in America has collapsed. Sales are down 46.5% from last year. The same sharp decline in gasoline sales has been seen in Europe with demand for gasoline down as much as 85%. With big box retailers slowing and automakers shutting down, a slowdown is expected in the next few weeks.

4) Stock market closings for – 7 APR 20:

Dow 22,653.86 down 26.13
Nasdaq 7,887.26 down 25.98
S&P 500 2,659.41 down 4.27

10 Year Yield: up at 0.74%

Oil: down at $24.26

23 March 2020

1) The shutting down of many of American service industries is having an effect on America’s hard pressed trucking industry. Suddenly, there are fewer hauling jobs, a result of the coronavirus control measures. There are 300,000 to 400,000 thousand truck drivers who own their trucks and don’t have much protection if rates or demand for their service falls. Trucking is often considered a leading economic indicator where the rest of the economy is heading, because 71% of the freight in America is moved by trucks. A downturn in freight being hauled indicates the economy is slumping.

2) President Trump says the U.S. may be headed for a recession for the first time in eleven years as the coronavirus cripples the world economies which in turn can pull the U.S. economy down despite it being strong. Experts anticipate America will enter a recession in the upcoming second quarter, from April through June, with a decline of 4% to 8% annual pace. The unemployment rate could zoom up to 6% from its current fifty year low of 3.5%, which would hinder a recovery. Typically, economic hard times opens the way for new technologies to displace workers as business strive for ways to reduce cost and remain profitable.

3) The Department of Labor reported a 30% increase in unemployment claims, which is one of the largest spikes in claims. This signals the start of feared layoffs in response to the coronavirus impact on the economy. As more businesses are vastly reducing or stopping operations, they have no real choice but to lay off workers in the hope of surviving the coming economic storm. America’s oil industry is facing massive layoffs with tens of thousands being laid off in the shale fields like the Permian Basin as oil prices drop to alarming lows. No longer profitable to pump out shale fields and strapped with high levels of debt, the oil companies are facing bankruptcy. Six years ago, a sharp price drop in oil cost 200,000 oil workers their jobs.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 MAR 20: The Dow had its worst month since 1931.

Dow 19,173.98 down 913.21
Nasdaq 6,879.52 down 271.06
S&P 500 2,304.92 down 104.47

10 Year Yield: down at 0.94%

Oil: down at $23.64

4 March 2020

1) In an emergency move the Federal Reserve has cut the interest rates by half a percent, in a effort to stem slower economic growth as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. This action was two weeks before the Fed’s scheduled meeting where business was expecting a reduction of the rate anyway, but because of the volatile stock market, it was decided to move more quickly. The announcement sent the markets into wild gyrations over fears the state of the economy is worst than feared.

2) Walmart, the retailing giant, is experimenting with a new health center. People can receive routine checkups and ongoing treatment of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes and heart disease at discount prices, with or without insurance. Services include lab work, x-rays, dental care, behavioral health counseling and eye and hearing exams. A checkup for an adult is $30, eye exam is $45 and dental exams for $25. Healthcare is 15% of the economy, and if the two test facilities prove successful, then Walmart is expected to expand the service to other stores. This service would also bring increased foot traffic to boost in-store sales.

3) The trading smartphone app Robinhood is experiencing a system wide outage on both its website and its app. Users are reporting issues on the platform, logging in and even trading. Equities, cryptocurrency and options trading are among some of the functionalities experiencing a major outage. Some users are demanding compensation for their losses during down times.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 MAR 20:

Dow 25,917.41 down 785.91
Nasdaq 8,684.09 down 268.08
S&P 500 3,003.37 down 86.86

10 Year Yield: down at 1.01%

Oil: down at $47.10

23 December 2019

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

2) Automaker Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles is making an all out push to clear out tens of thousands of vehicles which their dealerships have not ordered, because their new data driven production strategy has swelled their inventory. The automaker is offering its most aggressive discounts since the financial crisis to sell certain 2019 models under their Dodge, Jeep and Ram brands. Their sales staff is working overtime to sell more than 70,000 unassigned cars in December to their 2,400 dealerships.

3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 DEC 19:

Dow                28,455.09    up    78.13
Nasdaq             8,924.96    up    37.74
S&P 500            3,221.22    up     15.85

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.92%

Oil:    down   at    $60.36

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

2) Automaker Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles is making an all out push to clear out tens of thousands of vehicles which their dealerships have not ordered, because their new data driven production strategy has swelled their inventory. The automaker is offering its most aggressive discounts since the financial crisis to sell certain 2019 models under their Dodge, Jeep and Ram brands. Their sales staff is working overtime to sell more than 70,000 unassigned cars in December to their 2,400 dealerships.

3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.