12 October 2020

1) With the recession from the Covid-19 came predictions of waves of bankruptcy filings as businesses, large and small, failed. But that wave of bankruptcy has not materialized, and so far, there’s no sign that it will, indeed bankruptcies are down a little from last year. This is a good sign that companies and households are not as stressed as many economist feared. However, bankruptcy filings aren’t a perfect measure of hardship, with many companies barely hanging on, so bankruptcies may still be coming. Many small businesses and households go bust without ever formally filing for bankruptcy.

2) The four massive high tech companies, Google, Amazon, Apple and Facebook are under investigation at Federal and State levels for antitrust. These investigations are spurred by concerns that competition is being stifled by the domination of these companies, but there are concerns that the big tech is trying to also stifle conservative voices. Google is facing a relatively narrow complaint from the Justice Department that it seeks to disadvantage rivals in search and advertising. The focus on Apple is their apps store with accusations that Apple introduces new products and then put out apps that compete with them. Facebook has raised concerns over how they treat some of their app developers on its platform and therefore engaged in unlawful monopolistic practices. Amazon is suspected of conflict of interest in competition with small sellers on its marketplace platform.

3) Silicon Valley companies are thinking about the future of work taking actions from pay cuts to permanent work-from-home as they strive to cope with the coronavirus crisis. The big tech companies have formed various plans for the future of work. Some companies, (Twitter and Slack), said their employees never need to return to the office, while others, such as Microsoft, are adopting a hybrid model where employees report to the office only a few days a week. Amazon and Salesforce are adopting new benefits to help out working parents, such as subsidized back-up childcare and extended paid leave, while Facebook, employees may work from home permanently. However, if they leave the Bay Area for a less expensive city, they’ll may face a pay cut. Silicon Valley may bear little resemblance to the thriving hub before the pandemic. Tech companies have largely shut down their sprawling campuses and asked employees to work from home — in some cases, forever. When those offices reopen office life is unlikely to resemble the past. Companies may change their real estate plans, opting instead for a new type of office, or none at all.

4) Stock market closings for – 9 OCT 20:

Dow 28,586.90 up 61.39
Nasdaq 11,579.94 up 158.96
S&P 500 3,477.13 up 30.30

10 Year Yield: up at 0.78%

Oil: down at $40.52

24 June 2019

1) Gold, which is known as a ‘panic’ investment to guard against economic collapse, is passing $1,400 an ounce for the first time since 2013. Fueled by the fears of an international economic downturn and possible military action between Iran and the U.S., coupled with the large buying of gold by China, experts say that prices could reach $1,500 to $1,600 per ounce in the next year. Gold has historically been seen as a guard against devaluation of currencies.

2) Slack, the workplace messaging software used in tech and media companies, may be breaking the grip Wall Street has on Silicon Valley. The IPO’s of tech companies have been the controlling link of Wall Street on tech companies, but Slack used direct listing of its stock instead of the traditional IPO, thus cutting Wall Street out of the equation. This means that Wall Street isn’t able to tell companies what to do in becoming a public company.

3) Automation continues to cut into the job market with these ten career fields declining because of technology. The Telemarketer jobs are down 52%, followed by File clerks down 46%, Sorters of mail at 44%, Bill collectors down 39%, Data entry 36%, Order clerks 36%, Chief executives at 35%, Production worker helpers 30%, Installation, maintenance and repair helper 30% and finally Telecommunication line installer/repairers down 30%.

4) Stock market closings for- 21 JUN 19:

Dow                    26,719.13    down    34.04
Nasdaq                 8,031.71    down    19.63
S&P 500                2,950.46    down      3.72

10 Year Yield:    up   at    2.07%

Oil:    up   at    $57.60

6 February 2019

1) The executive and CEO of Quadriga, Canada’s largest crypto exchange, dies with $145 million dollars of customer money electronically locked away. Only the CEO knew the pass words needed to unlock the money.

2) EU economic slow down, with EU experiencing its weakest growth since 2013, amidst manufacturing slowdown. The German economy is accelerating while Frances is slowing down.

3) Tech companies Slack, Airbnb and Uber are making their IPOs this year, but several other tech companies are pulling their plans for IPO because of the uncertain world economic.

4) 5 FEB 19 Stock market closings:

Dow             25,411.52    up    172.15
Nasdaq          7,402.08    up      54.55
S&P 500         2,737.70    up      12.83

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.70%

Oil:     up   at    $53.81