17 March 2021

1) One part of the U.S. infrastructure that America can invest in now is the recycling infrastructure. The recycling infrastructure and related new technologies hasn’t been updated for roughly 20 years, in particular the massive growing plastics waste problem. Several years ago, China’s National Sword policy ended its role as a recipient of western waste, leaving the west with a seriously growing waste problem. Some consider the up coming bill on infrastructure upgrade will present an opportunity to leap ahead of the plastic problem with money for developing new technologies.

2) As if the American economy hasn’t suffered enough with the pandemic and record snow storms across the land, one more massive snow and ice storm system is sweeping across the nation again. Not only is there heavy snow, torrential rain and severe weather, but also there were 14 reported tornadoes, and additionally, wind gusts reaching as high as 87 mph in the Texas Panhandle with the region experiencing baseball-sized hail. Over 6 inches of rain has been reported in southern Missouri and over 4 inches of rain reported in Kansas and Nebraska, with all three states seeing flooding due to the storm. Snowfall rates of 1 to 2 inches per hour in Colorado and Wyoming, with up to 4 inches per hour locally in the foothills and mountains, closing highways and freeways. Totals of 1 to 4 feet of snow is expected in parts of the Rockies from this storm with 6 to 12 inches from Denver to Rapid City.

3) The microchip shortage continues with GM forced to shut down its Chevy Camaro Production. The global microchip shortage will force some automakers to prioritize the production of only their most important models. For GM, this means that Chevrolet Camaro and Cadillac CT4 and CT5 production must be temporarily paused. Whatever microchips GM has access to, will be diverted to those factories remaining in production, leaving other lines to fight for what’s left. This problem comes just when automakers are trying to climb out of the financial disaster from the pandemic, when makers are needing to make every auto sale they can get, to bring in much needed revenues. Many automakers are now delaying or pausing their development programs, the debut and on-sale dates receding, thereby further aggravating long range revenues. The microchip shortage was caused by semiconductor production stoppages early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Automakers underestimated the rate at which sales would recover, and so, it left them behind all the other companies that rely on microchips. It’s unclear when the shortage will end. Many major automakers, from Honda to Mercedes-Benz have had to either pause or cut production over these shortages, so GM isn’t unique here.

4) Stock market closings for – 16 MAR 21:

Dow 32,825.95 down by 127.51
Nasdaq 13,471.57 up by 11.86
S&P 500 3,962.71 down by 6.23

10 Year Yield: up at 1.62%

Oil: down at $64.91

17 December 2020

1) North Dakota, a state with an early shale oil boom, expects oil production growth to stall in the next two years because of the market crash and higher environmental standards. The problem is investment money because Wall Street is showing no signs to invest in a shale boom. Investors have grown wary of the poor cash flow even before the crash, and institutional investors are shunning oil because of climate change concerns. North Dakota has limited excessive natural gas flaring from oil wells, intending to control greenhouse emissions at the expense of production. The state is expecting output to decline in November and December because of a lack of oil well completions. Oil markets are shrinking due to the loss of demand, while growth in shale oil depends on investments to replace wells that decline rapidly.

2) The Federal Reserve shifts its focus to fighting climate change, with average temperatures climbing and severe weather events happening more frequently. The Fed’s recent financial stability report includes a section on climate change, signaling a risk that climate change could pose to the financial system. Federal Reserve supervisors expect banks to identify, measure, control, and monitor all material risks, which for many banks are likely to extend to climate risks. Therefore if those dangers aren’t considered, hazards such as storms, floods, droughts or wildfires could change the value of assets suddenly, causing a shock to the system.

3) The more a person understands interest rates, inflation, risk diversification and other financial concepts, the less likely they show signs of financial fear and distraught at times of serious economic troubles. At the start of the pandemic in March, 40% of households was making under $40,000 per year lost their jobs. By April, the jobless rate had soared to 14.7% while the $1,200 direct checks and supplemental $600 federal-unemployment benefits started. Researchers asked people if they could cover a $2,000 unexpected emergency expense, and18.9% said they couldn’t meet the expense. In a test, the survey of ‘at risks participants’ correctly answered about half of the three questions about how interest rates are calculated, inflation and risk, while people in better money condition answered almost all three (2.5 on average) correctly.

4) Stock market closings for – 16 DEC 20:
Dow 30,154.54 down by 44.77
Nasdaq 12,658.19 up by 63.13
S&P 500 3,701.17 up by 6.55
10 Year Yield: down at 0.92%
Oil: up at $47.88