31 July 2020

1) The American economy last quarter is the worst on record, with a 32.9% annual rate contraction (April – June). American business ground to a halt from the pandemic lockdown this spring, leaving the country in its first recession in eleven years. This wipes out five years of economic gains in just months. From January to March, the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) declined by an annualized rate of 5%. While the unemployment is declining as states open up from the shutdown, there are still about 15 million unemployed workers. Americans are spending less money during th lockdown, partly because of lost of jobs. Consumer spending is the biggest driver of the economy, and it declined at an annual rate of 34.6% for the second quarter.

2) While Walmart has posted surging sales for each month, it is still taking cost savings measures. The retailer has laid off hundreds of workers including store planning, logistics, merchandising and real estate. Also, Walmart is reorganizing its 4,750 stores by consolidation of divisions and eliminating some regional manager roles. Walmart is performing well because of high demand and low prices during the pandemic. The company isn’t opening as many new stores in the U.S. anymore, so Walmart doesn’t need as many people to find new locations and so design them.

3) Job postings in technology are 36% down from 2019 levels. This is attributed to increased competition, low priority in hiring and uncertainty over the pandemic. Therefore, the tech industry is also feeling the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Sending a very significant portion of its workers remote to work at home, there were predictions tech jobs would lead the recovery with increase job numbers. The ‘work at home’ was thought to show tech jobs might be available outside the traditional hubs. Neither has proved to be true. In short, the tech jobs are faring worst than the overall economy.

4) Stock market closings for – 30 JUL 20:

Dow 26,313.65 down 225.92
Nasdaq 10,587.81 up 44.87
S&P 500 3,246.22 down 12.22

10 Year Yield: down at 0.54%

Oil: down at $40.45

29 July 2020

1) The fast food mega-giant McDonald’s is reporting a bigger than expected drop in global restaurant sales across the world. This is a result of the pandemic restricting sales of their drive thru and delivery operations, and in some cases shutting restaurants down completely. With second quarter sales down by 30%, McDonald’s is facing a bumpy and expensive recovery. The franchise chain has 39,000 restaurants worldwide, of which 96% are now open, verses 75% at the start of the second quarter. Store sales were down 39% in April but by June was down only 12%. Net income is down by 68% for $483.8 million dollars. McDonald’s is permanently closing 200 locations in the U.S. amid those losses, more than half located in Walmart stores.

2) The Federal Reserve has announced that its lending programs will be extended until the end of the year. This indicates the feds don’t think the U.S. economy is weathering the pandemic storm very well and needs continued help. The program lends to small and medium sized businesses and was due to expire at the end of September. Continuing the program will provide a critical backstop to help the economy recover. This Thursday will bring the first look at the second quarter gross domestic product, which is the broadest measure of the economy, but it’s expected to show an ailing economy.

3) For the second time, the renowned gun maker Remington Arms is filing for bankruptcy. This is the second time in two years that Remington has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Chronic low sales is blamed for Remington’s decline, despite the overall increase in sales of guns in America because of the pandemic. One by one, American gun manufactures have succumb to imports. Remington reports assets of $100 million dollars compared to $500 million dollars in liabilities.

4) Stock market closings for – 28 JUL 20:

Dow 26,379.28 down 205.49
Nasdaq 10,402.09 down 134.17
S&P 500 3,218.44 down 20.97

10 Year Yield: down at 0.58%

Oil: down at $41.07

9 January 2020

1) The result of the Iranian missile attack on gas prices is expected to be minimal. Oil prices did briefly surge on Tuesday on news of the attacks fueling fears of a Middle East war between Iran and America, spiking 4% to top oil prices of $65 a barrel, but slipped down to 1.3% early next day. Some are expecting gas prices across the nation to rise five to ten cents per gallon over the next several days.

2) Data for the fourth quarter indicated 2019 will show strong growth, which will most likely lead into a strong growth for 2020. The GDP (Gross Domestic Product) growth for the fourth quarter is estimated to be 2.3%, better than the 2.1% growth for the third quarter. This would close out the GDP growth for 2019 at 2.4%, down from the 2.9% growth of 2018, but still enough to put fears of a recession to rest.

3) Walmart has unveiled its latest technology to counter Amazon and Kroger in the grocery battle- a grocery picking robot. The automated grocery system is called Alphabot and is designed to pick and pack orders as much as ten times faster than a human. The robot will allow Walmart to rapidly expand its capacity to fill orders for ‘demand on online’ grocery shopping. The Alphabot is a 20,000 square foot facility built onto present stores consisting of about 30 small cubic robots inside a giant shelving system, which can pick and pack products from a selection of 4,500 items.

4) Stock market closings for – 8 JAN 20:

Dow               28,745.09    up    161.41
Nasdaq            9,129.24    up      60.66
S&P 500           3,253.05    up      15.87

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.87%

Oil:    down   at    $59.98

23 December 2019

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

2) Automaker Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles is making an all out push to clear out tens of thousands of vehicles which their dealerships have not ordered, because their new data driven production strategy has swelled their inventory. The automaker is offering its most aggressive discounts since the financial crisis to sell certain 2019 models under their Dodge, Jeep and Ram brands. Their sales staff is working overtime to sell more than 70,000 unassigned cars in December to their 2,400 dealerships.

3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 DEC 19:

Dow                28,455.09    up    78.13
Nasdaq             8,924.96    up    37.74
S&P 500            3,221.22    up     15.85

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.92%

Oil:    down   at    $60.36

1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.1) Stock markets ended at record highs this last week, coming closer to what may well be a blockbuster year. This rally now covers four weeks, with one record closing after another, driven by easing of geopolitical worries. Trade worries have kept investors on the edge for most of 2019. The questions is, will this rally continue into next year?

2) Automaker Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles is making an all out push to clear out tens of thousands of vehicles which their dealerships have not ordered, because their new data driven production strategy has swelled their inventory. The automaker is offering its most aggressive discounts since the financial crisis to sell certain 2019 models under their Dodge, Jeep and Ram brands. Their sales staff is working overtime to sell more than 70,000 unassigned cars in December to their 2,400 dealerships.

3) Steel maker US Steel is closing a mill near Detroit and will lay off 1,500 workers, and in addition will cut its dividend in an attempt to reverse operating losses which is forecasted for the fourth quarter. The Great Lakes Works mill, which rolls slabs into sheets of steel will close, and shift its work to three other mills. Additional cost savings measures will be implemented including a $75 million dollar reduction on capital expenditures and cutting labor cost.

16 August 2019

1) Retail giant Walmart reported a strong second quarter and raised its earnings expectations for the year. This news eases concerns about consumer demand dropping because of the trade war with China. Shoppers spent more at stores and websites, indicating the consumer economy has not lost steam. Walmart posted a 20 quarter or five years of growth unmatched by any other retailer. The retailer gets 56% of its revenues from grocery sales, so it is less vulnerable to tariffs.

2) In July, American’s spent more at retail stores and restaurants, indicating the economic growth remains healthy, despite fears of a coming global economic slowdown and possible recession. Despite such fears, consumer confidence remains steady. Most economists are not forecasting a recession, because consumer spending and the job market remains strong.

3) Saudi Arabia is ramping up its oil exports to China, with crude shipments doubled over the last year, while its oil exports to America have dropped by nearly two thirds. This shift has occurred in part from oil embargo on Iran, which has caused Asian importers to shift away from Iran to other sources, aided by U.S. growing independence of any oil imports. The U.S. is becoming the worlds largest producer of oil.

4) Stock market closings for – 15 AUG 19:

Dow            25,579.39         up    99.97
Nasdaq         7,766.62    down      7.32
S&P 500        2,847.60          up      7.00

10 Year Yield:     down   at    1.53%

Oil:     up   at    $54.70

1 August 2019

1) General Electric suffered a loss last quarter despite two previous profitable quarters, a result of the restructuring cost of its electric power division and the grounding of Boeing’s 737 MAX. GE provides the jet engines used on the 737, which Boeing has reduced production of. The grounding of Boeing has drained off more cash than expected, but General Electric forecast a profitable year for 2019.

2) President Trump has fulfilled his campaign promise to lower drug prices by creating a pathway to allow Americans to legally and safely import lower cost prescription drugs from Canada. This reverses the opposition from federal health authorities, despite the public outcry over high prices for drugs in America. It’s uncertain when imports can start as the plan has to go through the time consuming regulatory approval and possible court challenges from drug makers. The opening of the door for cheaper drugs and keeping it open still faces an up hill battle with the political organizations of the pharmaceutical industry.

3) In an effort to keep the American economy on track, the Federal Reserve has reduced the benchmark interest rate by a quarter point to about 2.25%. This is a modest and widely expected move intended to keep the economy healthy in face of the trade war with China and the slowing economic growth overseas. In addition, the feds signaled that the cental bank is ready to make more cuts to stimulate the economy if necessary. A higher interest rate makes for a stronger dollar, a disadvantage for international trade. Wall Street anticipates as many as three more cuts this year, while in addition to the rate reduction, the feds will stop selling off assets this August, two months earlier than expected.

4) Stock market closings for – 31 JUL 19:

Dow             26,864.27    down    333.75
Nasdaq           8,175.42    down      98.19
S&P 500          2,980.38    down      32.80

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.02%

Oil:    down   at    $57.90

BLACKBERRY MIXED EARNINGS REPORT BRING A DIP TO THE STOCK

 

Blackberry pics

BY: Economic and Finance Report

Blackberry shares dipped a bit on Friday  because of their mixed earning report for the end of the year quarter. Finishing down to $9.99. There seems that there is still a lot more work to be done as Blackberry is restructuring the company.

The company did below what analysts had predicted of $1 billion dollars in revenue. Blackberry reported losing  $148 in revenue in the 3 quarter. Blackberry executives expect the company to continue with either “break-even” or a little better route in their cash flow for 2015, but the Chairman/CEO John Chen expects Blackberry to hit profitability in the beginning of 2016.

-SB