20 March 2020

1) Today, more coronavirus concerns have surfaced that most airlines will go bankrupt soon without government bailouts. The virus has shut global aviation down because of virus outbreaks as well as travel restrictions that are intended to contain the virus. Within weeks, many airlines will need government help to avoid bankruptcy. Major U.S. airlines are seeking $50 billion dollars in financial assistance because of the steep falloff in U.S. travel demand. Estimates are for $25 billion dollars in grants, $25 billion dollars in loans and significant tax relief to survive.

2) Monday markets opened with another sharp downfall of all three major markets despite the Federal Reserve embarking on a massive monetary stimulus campaign to curb the slowing economic growth from the coronavirus. Shortly after opening, trading was halted for fifteen minutes from a ‘circuit breaker’ triggered by the S & P 500. The U.S. central bank has launched a massive $700 billion dollar quantitative easing program designed to help cushion the economic downside from the virus. The Dow was down 11% while both the Nasdaq and S & P fell more than 10%.

3) As fears grow of a world economic downturn, which will put economic stress on the U.S. economy, people are becoming concerned about their jobs. American workers may lose their jobs by the millions as the effects of the virus ripple through the financial system, the impact being devastating. The disease has spread rapidly around the world with whole nations shutting down as well as major cities. It’s unknown just what the impact will be for the world economy, when major economic areas isolate themselves from the system, even for a few weeks. Many segments of the economy are reporting significant problems which can lead to further problems across the U.S. and world economy. All this translates into layoffs, at a time when the young people of America have limited opportunities.

4) Stock market closings for – 19 MAR 20:

Dow 20,087.19 up 88.27
Nasdaq 7,150.58 up 160.73
S&P 500 2,409.39 up 11.29

10 Year Yield: down at 1.12%

Oil: up at $25.08

12 March 2020

1) The WHO (World Heath Organization) has declared the coronavirus to be a pandemic, which in turn has cause the markets to make another plunge after its apparent recovery on Tuesday. The number of coronavirus cases world wide is now in excess of 100,000 with more than 1,000 in the U.S. The central banks in other western nations are cutting their interest rates in an attempt to minimize the effects of the virus and avoid a world wide economic slowdown. At present, there doesn’t seem to be an end to the markets volatility.

2) The United Kingdom is levying an additional 2% tax on big high tech companies starting the first of April. Call the ‘digital services tax’, it will levy a tax on the revenues from search engines, social media services and online marketplaces used by British citizens, but it only applies to companies making more than $650 million dollars and derive more than $35 million dollars revenue from UK users. This will encompass companies like Amazon, Apple, facebook and Google. The EU (European Union) is considering a similar tax, but with a 3% rate.

3) Oil production in the U.S. is expected to drop as a result of the dramatic collapse in oil prices. This would be the first decline in output since 2016 as drillers are cutting back on capital spending. Oil prices are below $35 a barrel, well below the breakeven price for most American shale fields. Oil prices have been pushed down by the economic impact of the coronavirus plus Saudi Arabia and Russian failing to agree on limited oil production.

4) Stock market closings for – 11 MAR 20 Stocks down 20% from their high.

Dow 23,553.22 down 1464.94
Nasdaq 7,952.05 down 392.20
S&P 500 2,741.38 down 140.85

10 Year Yield: up at 0.82%

Oil: down at $33.12

10 March 2020

1) Monday markets opened in a steep downward spiral from sell offs, driven by the coronavirus fears, followed by the sharp drop in oil prices. The Dow dropped 2,000 points, with a massive sell off of both the S&P 500 and Nasdaq, which triggered a key market circuit breaker that halted trading for fifteen minutes. There are widespread fears over the economic impact of low oil prices, with some experts fearing oil prices down to $20 a barrel. Gold prices crossed the $1,700 dollar an ounce, hitting the highest since December 2012. The banks are hard pressed as the interest continues to sink, cutting into their margins.

2) Experts speculate that the Feds will cut the interest rate to zero in the next few months in an effort to forestall a downturn of the economy. The entire U.S. yield curve fell below 1% for the first time in history on expectations that the Federal Reserve will cut rates to zero in the next few months. Some speculate the Feds may adopt a negative rate just as some European countries have, such as Germany’s -1%.

3) While checkout-free with cashless supermarkets is now a novelty, Amazon expects this technology to spread to other retailers. Amazon has announced it plans to license its automated checkout technology to other retailers, telling of several other companies that have already signed up for the technology. The technology has been proven with cashless convenience stores across America and with Amazon’s new Go-supermarkets. The technology represents another significant step in retail automation.

4) Stock market closings for – 9 MAR 20: The stock market is like a rectal thermometer- it’s rude and crude, but surprisingly effective in showing a sick economy.

Dow 23,851.02 down 2013.76
Nasdaq 7,950.68 down 624.94
S&P 500 2,746.56 down 225.81

10 Year Yield: down at 0.50%

Oil: down at $30.24

2 March 2020

1) The stock markets continue their downward crash over worries of the conronavirus impact on economies making the week the worst week since the financial crisis. Caterpillar, a bellwether stock for global growth, slide down 3%, the worst performer among Dow stocks. Apple dropped 2.9% while Chevron and Cisco Systems are down more than 2%. Investors are worried the downward slide may continue after the conronavirus subsides, especially if China doesn’t return to its previous position, so recovery could be a long haul.

2) The sale of smartphones is collapsing in China, which is the largest market in the world. The plunged in sales is directly due to the coronavirus outbreak. Chinese companies had skidded to a halt, with the accelerated outbreak last month a result of quarantine mandates, travel restrictions and factory shutdowns. Huawei, the Chinese tech company, is being hit hard because it is the top selling smartphone in China.

3) Gold prices have been acting strangely with the reversals in the markets because of coronavirus fears. Traditionally, gold has been a ‘panic investment’ that investors flee to when there’s economic uncertainty, but this time investors are selling gold to generate cash. They are fleeing anything priced via bidding, for safer assets such as treasury bonds, which in turn is driving down bond interest rates. This indicates how worried the professional investors are about the world economic system.

4) Stock market closings for – 28 FEB 20:

Dow 25,409.36 down 357.28
Nasdaq 8,567.37 up 0.89
S&P 500 2,954.22 down 24.54

10 Year Yield: down at 1.13%

Oil: down at $45.26

26 February 2020

1) Global trade experiences its first full-year drop since the financial crisis, with weaker world growth and a manufacturing recession taking their toll. The spread of the coronavirus, with its impact on businesses and households, is increasingly pulling world economics down. While the decline isn’t huge, it is the first since 2009 and follows growth of more than 3% in 2018. The virus has shut off huge areas of China causing the closing of factories and now is spreading internationally.

2) The markets continue to follow the Dow’s thousand point drop with more large loses. To add to the financial worries, bond yields are slipping down, raising concerns that the global economy is slowing significantly because of the spreading coronavirus. There is heavy buying of treasuries in order to shelter money, with the ten year Treasury yield traded at 1.32%, an all time low, with the thirty year bond yield also reaching a record low. Analysts are already cutting their earnings estimates for the first quarter, further dampening hopes for better near term growth.

3) Retail giant Amazon has opened its first Go Grocery store in Seattle. The automated store is cashierless where customers walk in, and get what they want, and on walking out, computer and sensors electronically charging their purchases. The store is over 10,000 square feet and has about 5,000 items including fresh produce, meats and alcohol. This is just another example of the grocery retailers efforts to automate their operations and reduce labor costs.

4) Stock market closings for – 25 FEB 20: Dow is down 1900 points in two days and some experts fear the markets are 500 points away from being a correction.

Dow 27,081.36 down 879.44
Nasdaq 8,965.61 down 255.67
S&P 500 3,128.21 down 97.68

10 Year Yield: down at 1.33%

Oil: down at $50.10

18 February 2020

1) In order to help contain the Chinese coronavirus outbreak, China’s central bank has started deep cleaning and destroying potentially infected cash. The virus appears able to survive on surfaces for many hours which is why buildings in affected areas are regularly disinfecting elevator buttons, door handles and other commonly touched surfaces. Since cash money changes hands multiple times in a day, it too is a potential media to transmit the virus. The cash is disinfected with ultraviolet light and high temperatures, then stored for seven to fourteen days before returning to circulation.

2) The price of wine is expected to drop to its lowest levels in five years, in part because of a surplus of grapes in California. Additionally, there is a decreased demand for wine, with the lower prices lasting up to three years. Vineyards began planting thousands of acres of new vines in 2016, plus more efficient harvesting methods have combined to increase the supply of grapes.

3) GM (General Motors) has decided to pull out of Australia, New Zealand and Thailand as part of their strategy to exit markets that don’t produce adequate returns on investments. The car maker has 828 employees in Australia and New Zealand and another 1,500 in Thailand which will be eliminated.

4) Stock market closings for – 17 FEB 20:

Dow 29,398.08 down 25.23
Nasdaq 9,731.18 up 19.21
S&P 500 3,380.16 up 6.22

10 Year Yield: down at 1.59%

Oil: down at $51.92

4 February 2020

1) All ready shaken by the trade war, China is now being racked by the coronavirus, with fears of the virus pushing the Chinese markets down by $393 billion dollars on the first day of trading since the Lunar New Year. This is an 8% drop on the Shanghai composite index, the biggest drop in more than four years. This is despite the biggest cash injection of China’s financial system since 2004. Additionally, commodities contracts have all posted sharp drops, a strong indication of an economic slowdown.

2) The shopping malls are dying as shopping habits of consumers change over to the internet. It’s estimated that 25% of American malls will shut their doors by 2022, and more of the 9,300 retail stores that closed in 2019 were in malls. Mall owners are searching for ways to halt the trend of shrinking retailing in malls, including buying major retail companies such as Forever 21 and Aeropostale.

3) As traditional brick-and-mortar stores continue its slide downwards, a number of companies are considered at risk of bankruptcy this next year. Stores like Neiman Marcus ply their way in red ink, including J. Crew, Francesca’s, Rite Aid, JCPenny, Pier 1, Dressbarn, Destination Maternity, Men’s Wearhouse and Stein Mart. Companies heavy into cloths and fashion ware are the ones struggling the most to avoid the bankruptcy courts.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 FEB 20:

Dow              28,399.81    up    143.78
Nasdaq          9,273.40    up     122.47
S&P 500         3,248.92    up       23.40

10 Year Yield:    unchanged   at    1.52%

Oil:    down   at    $49.91

27 January 2020

1) Bayer AG is facing a fourth jury trial over its Roundup weed killer causing cancer. Plaintiff’s claim glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is a carcinogen. In the three previous trials, Bayer was found liable for causing cancer resulting in damages of tens of millions of dollars, which are being appealed. The number of claimants are more than 75,000 although so far less than 50,000 claims have been formally filed.

2) Banks are raising the limit on people’s credit cards, even when they don’t ask for the raise. This is at a time when Americans are drowning in debt, in a effort to further boost their profits. For years Capital One financial Corp. resisted increasing limits of customers who looked vulnerable to getting over their heads in debt, but now have reversed their policy actively seeking more debt from customers.

3) A second coronavirus case has been confirmed in the U.S., a Chicago resident who had traveled to Wuhan in December. Wuhan is the center of virus outbreak in China, having already killed a couple of dozen or more people. China is now shutting down several very large cities in an attempt to stop the spread of the disease. Fears over the economic damage to the American economy has cause a sharp drop in the U.S. markets from news of a second coronavirus case. Presently, the U.S. government is monitoring passengers flying in from China for early signs of the illness hoping to quarantine the sick and prevent spreading of the virus.

4) Stock market closings for – 24 JAN 20:

Dow               28,989.73    down    170.36
Nasdaq            9,314.91    down      87.57
S&P 500           3,295.47    down       30.07

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.68%

Oil:    down   at    $54.20

TESLA’S MARKET VALUE SURPASSES FORD MOTORS & GENERAL MOTORS MARKET SHARE VALUE COMBINED!

Image Credit: NBCNews.com

By: Economic & Finance Report

Breaking News: Tesla Inc market value has now surpassed both legendary Ford Motors and General Motors company market values combined.

January 8, 2020 (Wednesday) Tesla Inc had a market cap of $89 billion, approx 2 more billion dollars then Ford Motors ($50 billion) and General Motors ($37 billion) combined.

Many of Tesla Inc’s attributes for rising market cap has to be with a profitable 3rd quarter the electrical auto maker had; also surpassing auto deliveries in the Chinese market, while also having its stock more then double over the past few months. These all seem to be contributing factors to its increased market cap currently.

With all the accolades Tesla has achieved, there are skeptics in the investment community who believe the company will not able to sustain cash flow nor provide more profitability in the next few years.

All this remains to be seen...SB

HEDGEFUNDS TO SEE MORE CLOSURES IN 2019 THAN LAUNCHES!!!!!!!!!!!!

By: Economic & Finance Report

2019 was not the year of the hedge fund. Many hedge funds in 2019 were strapped for cash and liquidity was not as readily available, as in previous years.

According to Bloomberg news wire, hedge funds will be reporting more losses and closures for the 5th year in a row. More then 4,000 hedgefunds have liquidated in the past five years (HedgeFund Research Inc).

The reasons have varied on why hedge funds have been closing in recent years, such as investors revolting, or wanting their money earlier from the funds, to simply hedgefund officers getting tired on running their funds and family owned offices.

The profits have not been there as well. There are various reasons of funds closing at rapid paces, but take note this is a trend that may continue until the profits are there.

Credit: Bloomberg.com, Hedgefund Research Inc