7 October 2019

1) As part of its restructuring plan, HP announced they will cut about 7,000 to 9,000 jobs, resulting in an estimated savings of about $1 billion dollars. While HP expects to incur labor and non-labor cost of about $1 billion dollars, they expect to generate at lease $3 billion dollars of free cash flow. As of 31 October 2018, HP had world wide employment of about 55,000 workers.

2) Consumer spending has been the bright spot in an economy showing signs of weakening on multiple fronts, in particular manufacturing. Economists worry if consumer spending will continue to prop up the economy, saying that the up coming Christmas season will be a test. Issues such as trade, interest rates, global risk factors and political rhetoric are where confidence can be eroded by deterioration of these items.

3) The new Costco in Shanghai China reports membership of more than 200,000 as compared to an American average of 68,000 per store. Costco will open a second Shanghai location in early 2021. The first day opening, the store was so swamped with customers, that the doors had to be closed for four hours to limit the number of people inside to safe limits.

4) Stock market closings for – 4 OCT 19:

Dow                  26,573.72    up    372.68
Nasdaq               7,982.47    up    110.21
S&P 500              2,952.01    up      41.38

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.52%

Oil:    up   at    $53.01

3 October 2019

1) Despite positive last quarters, both General Motors and Ford Motor company’s are concerned about the U.S. auto market taking a turn for the worse. Shares for the two automakers, as well as Fiat Chrysler, fell because of smaller figures for the quarter, although smaller than market analysis projected. There are also concerns of the overall impact from a slowing U.S. and international economies with the impact it would have on new car sales.

2) For the second day, the stock markets nose dived with the Dow losing more than 800 points these last two days. Fears of an economic recession cause the Dow to lose 490 points on Wednesday, with indications that manufacturing is slowing down, and even though manufacturing accounts for only 10% of the economy, investors see this as an indication that the economy is contracting soon with a possible recession in the near future.

3) With the markets in decline, there is a lot riding on the up coming job numbers this Friday. Fears of a coming recession could be reinforced with poor job numbers signaling that a recession is nearing. So far, there is little evidence of layoffs on the rise despite scattered reports that more companies are cutting jobs.

4) Stock market closings for – 2 OCT 19:

Dow           26,078.62    down    494.42
Nasdaq        7,785.25    down   123.44
S&P 500       2,887.61    down     52.64

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.60%

Oil:    down   at    $52.47

4 September 2019

1) The ever present problem of growing student debt is being aggravated by the ever rising cost of college. This rise in cost is fueled by decreasing funding by governments, a lack of cost controls by college administrations and an emphases on plush facilities instead of real education support.

2) Manufacturing shrank in August for the first time since August 2016. The manufacturing index slid to 49.1 from 51.2 in July, where an index below 50 signals a contraction. Production declined by 1.3 percent while employment fell by 4.3 percent with new orders falling by 3.6 percent. With the trade war increasing the cost of Chinese manufactured imports, it would be expected that American manufacturing would be increasing.

3) The United Auto Workers union is targeting GM for contract talks, with the UAW approving a strike. The UAW represents nearly 150,000 hourly workers at Ford, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler with 96% of it’s workers OKing a strike. Leaders of the UAW are under investigation for corruption by the FBI who have conducted raids on key leadership members recently for mis use of monies. The union is angry at GM for layoffs and the closing of plants, plus production plants in Mexico.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 SEP 19:

Dow              26,118.02    down    285.26
Nasdaq           7,874.16    down      88.72
S&P 500          2,906.27    down       20.19

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.47%

Oil:    down   at    $53.90

3 September 2019

1) Gold is renowned for being a panic investment, something that investors move their money into when fearing that sever financial troubles are coming. Investors are worried about political uncertainty that plagues world markets, and are pushing gold prices up to record highs. Real yields in the US have fallen to about zero which makes gold especially appealing as a safe haven.

2) The Price of oil falls as the trade war deepens stoking concerns over growth. Principal cause for concern is the trade war and the deterioration of manufacturing in China. Oil prices is considered a gage of economic health because slower growth means there will be less demand for oil, so prices drop. Furthermore, since oil is bought and sold as futures commodities, the price reflects anticipation of near future economic state of the world.

3) Owners of 98,000 Volkswagen AG U.S. vehicles which had fuel economy labels overstating efficiency will ask a U.S. judge for $26 million dollars. The EPA said the German automaker must forfeit greenhouse gas emissions credits and lower the fuel economy ratings on these vehicles after using software to falsify fuel efficiency ratings.

4) Stock market closings for – 2 SEP 19:

Markets closed for holiday.

1 July 2019

1) Consumer spending increased in May as well as prices creeping up too. Both point to a slowing economic growth and benign inflation pressures. These two facts gives the Federal Reserve more reason to cut interest rates next month. Inflation is under the 2% target for this year with a projected 1.5% verses 1.8% originally expected. Consumer spending is about two thirds the U.S. economy.

2) Consumerism is changing fast, with a push to ‘no cashier checkouts’. Amazon Go stores are pushing the technology where sales payment is made automatically just by picking out items and walking out the door. E-commerce and on-line shopping continue their assault on traditional brick and mortar stores. Another strategy is showrooms in place of stores that allow the customer to try out products prior to purchasing them. Finally, drone delivery allows getting your purchases at home in less time than it takes to drive to and from a store. All these new technologies are coming together with increased profits by reducing labor cost.

3) The weekly jobless claims has increased more than expected, although there is no sign of significant layoffs as the economy slows down. Unemployment claims were 227,000 up by 10,000. The economy is slowing with manufacturing sliding down and the trade deficient widening as consumer confidence ebbs.

4) Stock market closings for- 28 JUN 19: Results from bank stress test edged markets up. Best June performance since 1938.

Dow            26,599.96    up    73.38
Nasdaq         8,006.24    up    38.49
S&P 500        2,941.76    up    16.84

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.00%

Oil:    down   at    $58.20

3 January 19

1) Tiny houses for the young are more trendy with a wide variety of styles and designs, as more young people seek affordable housing of their own.

2) Global stocks continue falling because of concerns over Chinese economy and Brexit problems. Additionally, Chinese manufacturing segment of economy is no longer growing.

3) Fracking oil wells are not producing as much oil as forecast. For thousands of wells drilled in the last five year, they are producing less than forecasted. Some are off track by as much as 50%.

4) 2 JAN 19 Stock market closings:

Dow           23,346.24 up 18.78
Nasdaq      6,665.94      up 30.66
S&P 500           2,510.03 up       3.18

10 Year Yield: down at 2.66%

Oil: down at $45.89

EFR PODCAST EP. #28: TARIFF WARS

By: Economic & Finance Report

On this podcast #28, Bizman Bassey (Sammy BE), James Lymon and Jon Don Sterling, discuss the TARIFF situation between US, China and the rest of the world.

They discuss how manufacturing plays a major role in this TARIFF escapade, as well other business, finance and economic news…This is where you need to be.. Check it out…

#BEBless #StayBless #GODBless

#RealRecognizeDeal$$$

Website Platforms To Check Out:

1) www.instagram.com/EcoFireTV

2) www.twitter.com/EcoFireTV

3) www.EconomicandFinanceReport.com (Economic & Finance Blog Site)

4) www.Soundcloud.com/Economic-FinanceReport (Podcast/Online Show)

5) www.youtube.com/channel/UCWZo5bug…Nlb2VRfDCQ/videos (EFR.Tv Youtube Ch)

6) www.SammyBuysHomes.com (Real Estate Investment)

7) www.TraderSoul.com (Financial Trading Website)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EARS To The GROUND!!!!!!!!!

By: Economic & Finance Report

We have a new section on Economic & Finance Report, entitled EARS To The GROUND…

EARS To The GROUND,We will be showcasing daily reporting from new around the world (mainly on economic, economy, business, finance, but not limited to) news sources that is readily available, and has been readily available.

EARS To The GROUND, will be providing tid-bits from news around the globe that our readership may not know is available or would want insight on….

Stay Tuned 4 EARS To The GROUND…….. SB

  


1) Slow growth of European manufacturing continues for 18 months as a result of fears of international trade.  The issue of trade tariffs and the impact of exports from Europe leave manufactures reluctant to invest in expansion fearful that their markets may diminish leaving them high and dry..

 

 

 

FUTURE of HYPER CONSUMERISM!!!!!!!!!!!

The Real Value to Society for the Youth of America is as Consumers, But What Becomes of Them if Hyper-Consumerism Declines.

By: James Lyman BSAE, BSEE, MSSM

Economic & Finance Report

I’m old enough to remember the first oil crisis of 1973, when the Arab nations tried to punish America for her support of Israel in the Seventy-Two war by cutting off oil shipments. American manufacturing was already in decline when the economic shock of oil shortages ripped through society. Suddenly, American manufacturing started crumbling away as factory after factory closed with American business losing all interest in making their money by manufacturing. The Rust Belt was born. Confronted with a growing problem of spreading unemployment and diminishing opportunity for people, the government had to come up with a new way of doing things, a new kind of economy.

The solution was deemed to be the service economy, the hyper-consumerism where people’s value in the economy and to society was as consumers working to support other consumers, who in turn worked to support more consumers. Instead of producing real material wealth as was formally done with a manufacturing based economy, America would depend almost exclusively on the multiplying effect of money being exchanged from one person to another, a basic principle taught in any introduction course of economics.

Not long ago I wrote another article titled, “Tiny House – Tiny Future” about how the millenniums were turning away from the traditional living in large houses and instead going to homes that are one tenth the traditional size, and consequently foregoing the purchasing common to the hyper-consumerism society simply because they no longer have the room to keep stuff. This I proposed was maybe a sign that hyper-consumerism was coming to an end, that it was not sustainable. With diminishing opportunities for the young, they don’t have the monies to participate in hyper-consumerism the buying of things just to be buying and having things.

Then while checking my email, I glimpsed a banner for a news story about how some of the top ten retailers where closing stores, which instantly caught my attention. Could this be another sign that hyper-consumerism was on the decline, that the much vaunted service economy we depend on is now crumbing just as manufacturing with the rust belt did? Will the millenniums and Z Generation be less able to make substantive contributions to society? I decided to check into this and here’s a parcel list of those retailers who are contracting by closing stores:

Sears & Kmart: 43 additional stores

J.C. Penney: 138 stores

Macy’s: 68 stores

Payless ShoeSource:  512 stores and counting

Radio Shack:  1,000 stores with only 70 remaining

Staples:  70 stores

CVS: 70 stores

Neiman Marcus: number not stated

Furthermore, some of the top American retailers may be declaring bankruptcy this year. No doubt, you’ve heard the recent story of how Alfred Angelo Bridal, the national bridal gown retailer, suddenly closed their doors in bankruptcy leaving hundreds of soon to be brides with nothing to wear to their nuptials but what was already in their closets. Not only that, but they would get just a fraction of their money back  and then months or years from now at that!

So what if this is portents of things to come? So what if the youth of America doesn’t have the hyper-consumerism based economy of their parents and grandparents? Well the real question is, what do they have instead? What is in line to replace it? The answer is nothing! No one in the government is working on some alternative, just like 1973 when American manufacturing was fading. It wasn’t until the shock of the oil crisis that our government gave the situation any consideration, and then it was a quicky decision with little to no real consideration (in other words talking points), and certainly no modeling of the consequences from that decision. That time, they sort of lucked out and it’s worked for several decades, but can they luck out again?

And how do I know that no consideration is being given to a possible demise of hyper-consumerism? Because you hear virtually nothing about the obsolete people problem with the displacement of workers by technology. This is a very integral part of today’s economic problems for the millenniums, in that anytime you can reduce the intellectual-skill levels required for a job, you reduce your labor cost. Displacement by technology means that millenniums are less able to make money because machines are doing the better paying work. Without money, their value as consumers diminishes so they are less able to support a hyper-consumerism based economy. Like the washing away of sand under the foundation of a house, there just comes a time when the house can no longer stand.

Without hyper-consumerism  what will become of so many of America’s youth.

WHITE HOUSE MANUFACTURING & STRATEGIC POLICY COUNCILS NO MORE EXISTENT…………

By: Economic & Finance Report

The White House Strategic Policy & Manufacturing  Councils have disbanded. Both Councils were set up by President Trump and the White House, for top level executives in the business spectrum, to bring forth and initiate ideas to help bring jobs to American workers.

Many CEOs of the Councils stepped down because of the handling of the situation that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday August 12, 2017. Many of the CEO were angered and bothered; on how the President confronted the situation via news conference; in which he waited a few days, to speak on the dire situation. The CEO’s felt uneasy and uncomfortable about how the President handled the racial tensions that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia that weekend of August 12, 2017.

The Manufacturing & Strategic-Policy Councils were set up to assist and advise the President on job creation initiatives for working Americans, and to implement job creation policies in the United States.-SB