TESLA’S MARKET VALUE SURPASSES FORD MOTORS & GENERAL MOTORS MARKET SHARE VALUE COMBINED!

Image Credit: NBCNews.com

By: Economic & Finance Report

Breaking News: Tesla Inc market value has now surpassed both legendary Ford Motors and General Motors company market values combined.

January 8, 2020 (Wednesday) Tesla Inc had a market cap of $89 billion, approx 2 more billion dollars then Ford Motors ($50 billion) and General Motors ($37 billion) combined.

Many of Tesla Inc’s attributes for rising market cap has to be with a profitable 3rd quarter the electrical auto maker had; also surpassing auto deliveries in the Chinese market, while also having its stock more then double over the past few months. These all seem to be contributing factors to its increased market cap currently.

With all the accolades Tesla has achieved, there are skeptics in the investment community who believe the company will not able to sustain cash flow nor provide more profitability in the next few years.

All this remains to be seen...SB

Yo-Yo’s of Life: The Threads Of Technology Displacement In My Latest Novel And How The Problems Of The Millenniums Are Rooted Decades In The Past.

By: James Lyman BSAE, BSEE, MSSM

Economic & Finance Report

I just finished my fourth fictional novel under my pen name R.K.O. Timoshenko (all available on amazon.com) that is set in the mid 1970’s, when the roots of technology displacement of people was becoming prevalent. There are three characters, Heather who is a liberal arts major having been through a very abusive marriage and acrimonious divorce. Her landlord John, who is an engineer in the Air Force returning to the university to study electronics and computers, intent on joining the exploding computer revolution. And finally, the third main character, the MITS Altair 8800, the world’s first personal computer two years before the famous Apple II and TRS-80.

As a psychology major, Heather is very much an alien, or one who so fails to advance technologically that they become aliens in their homeland. She and John are about as opposite as people can be, plus having faulty perceptions of each other from their senior year together in highschool. But years later, circumstances bring them together as tenant and landlord while both attend university. In discussing the problems for women and the woman’s liberation movement with her teacher Gloria, Heather complains that the movement is geared to the professional woman, the upper 5% of the American woman population. That the movement seems to look down on woman working as secretaries and typist, which then comprised about one third the jobs that woman worked at. She then poses the question of what will the woman’s

movement do if these computer boys should invent a machine that replaces the secretary/typist thus eliminating a third of the jobs for woman, not realizing she has accurately forecasted the future for so many woman. That in just a few more months, the first wordprocessor program for small computers would appear, and with the explosive growth of low cost personal computers, all those jobs would disappear in a decade. That in less than ten years, the US Department of Labor would announce they were drastically reducing their career forecast for secretary/typist because of the unforseen impact of new technologies – the word processor with low cost computers.

The computer boys had indeed replaced one third of the jobs for American women.

And as is so often the case, the ‘Gloria’s’ have no answers. But this is just one example of jobs being eliminate by low cost computers, for in the factories, robots where becoming more prevalent and so were also eliminating many of those good paying manufacturing jobs for the men. I recently saw a news article about a California manufacture of high end flashlights, the factory owner complaining that since he had to use two parts made in China, he couldn’t put “Made in America” on the label, which was the point of the news report. But they showed pictures of the factory, which employed about 300 people, and it was huge! It looked like about three aircraft hangers set end to end, and as far as you could see, there was line after line of green metal cabinets. Little industrial sheet metal houses … where the machine robots lives! There was only one or two humans walking the aisles and cross walkways. It’s a factory, like so many other American factories, where most of the 0employees0 are machines.

It’s been that way across the spectrum of both manufacturing and business in general, and this process continues today, changing the world and future for the millenniums because automation and technology displacement is now on the middle and upper income white collar workers. Since the economic crash in 2007, there has been numenius news reports of middle and upper level management in the six figures income, who have been laid off. Where once they could find new jobs in a few days to weeks, they have gone months, even years without a nibble. And in those reports, the people express confusion why they can’t find new jobs. This is the result of another artifact of technology displacement called “Organizational Innovation” as described in the new book “Race Against the Machine” 1 where advancements in communications and computers have allowed corporations to reorganize themselves to do the work with fewer skilled management people.

Automation and technology displacement is no longer some poor sod working down on the factory floor, for that’s now all done and past tense. It’s now the higher level, higher paid workers who are the targets of automation.

It was just by happenstance that the woman character Heather foretold what would happen to so many women, and how the woman’s movement, which she supported, would have little effect on improving the station of woman in American society simple because it did not recognize and address the growing problem of technology displacement for both men and woman. You can’t solve problems by ignoring major components of a problem.

In the book, computers are used to show the pronounced gulf between ‘Heather the alien’ and

‘John the technologist’, which is the bases for their conflict and incompatibility. They are going in different directions in life, with Heather trying to understand just what this incompatibility really is, while John is absorbed in understanding and enjoying the emerging digital electronics technology. But despite their fundamental differences, living close together intertwines their lives more and more, until slowly they become one as a married couple.

While this story is set in 1975-6, it continues unabated today for the millenniums as they struggle for a future of their own.

1) “Race Against the Machine”, Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee, Digital Frontier Press, Lexington, Massachusetts, 2011, p56.

GOLDMAN SACHS WILL NOW BE RATING EMPLOYEES VIA REAL TIME !!!!!!!

By: Economic & Finance Report

Goldman Sach’s rolled out a new review/performance based system to rate and grade employees performance at the work place. The new system allows employees to attain, receive information and feed back from their supervisors and managers.

This innovative system allows employees and managers to get feedback among themselves all year round.  Entitled Ongoing Feedback 360+ allows employees more interactons and communication with their superiors on many work related issues and allows the managers to communicate to the employee on how to handle different work related issues, in a timely fashion.

The Ongoing Feedback 360+ will be used to allow direct communication with management and the employees at Goldman Sach’s, in a real time based ordinance. -SB

Nigeria, not Kenya, is about to become Africa’s next big technology hub

Nigeria Developing Tech Hub 

*(pic above)Konga, an e-commerce site, is a Nigerian tech pioneer. (Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye)

There’s too much money in Nairobi.

 That’s one way to explain why some venture capitalists are setting their sights elsewhere.
 

Largely off the back of Mpesa, the hugely successful mobile money-transfer system, the Kenyan capital has gained a reputation for technological innovation—and with it an influx of no-strings (or few-strings) development funding that has crowded out some of the private investment searching for tech startups to finance.

Now investors are looking to the other side of the African continent for results. Nigeria, with nearly 200 million people, a growing economy, and no shortage of local problems, stands out as an option. It’s slowly building up a tech sector of its own. The funding circuit is still small: probably no more than 10 companies investing money, says Kresten Buch, founder of the Nairobi tech accelerator 88mph (which has since expanded to South Africa).

 

Buch recently started working with Chika Nwobi of seed investment firm Level 5 Labs in Lagos, to become the latest investor to enter Nigeria. The pair have teamed up to start 440ng, a tech accelerator that puts between $20,000 and $100,000 into startups and provides a workspace and mentorship. It graduated its first cohort of nine startups this week. (Underscoring the newness of the local tech scene, only two of the nine have founders with prior startup experience.)

 

The biggest difference between Nigeria and other major African economies is its sheer size. With roughly four times as many people as Kenya or South Africa, Nigeria is big enough to reward products and services that are domestic in nature. “When I was investing in Kenya and in South Africa, it was very hard to find businesses in those markets where the opportunity is big enough for them to stay in that market. Nigeria has parallels to the US market, where you can say, ‘Let’s just take the US, even if we stay there, we will become a very big company,’” says Buch.

 

The first set of companies that are growing up in Nigeria, says Nwobi, are based on proven models from the West: things like travel, e-commerce, jobs, and deals. “But now I think, what I’m seeing with 440ng, is more people trying to solve more local problems.”

 

One example of that is Obiwezy, a venue for selling used smartphones. Nigeria is primarily a pre-paid market, where customers pay the full cost of a handset up front. That puts most high-end devices out of reach for all but the very rich. But the aspiration to own a high-end Apple or Samsung handset remains, as it does elsewhere in the world. Obiwezy’s founders figure that a secondhand market—with warranties—is one way to sate that demand. They have tied up with MTN, a large telco, to offer the service.

 

Nigeria still has a big hole where investors willing to put in between $100,000 and $1 million should be, says Buch. For now, those investors are ensconced in Nairobi. But Buch suggests that will change as Nigeria’s companies grow larger, signaling opportunity to deeper-pocketed investors looking for returns. “We want to create successful companies. I don’t want to think, ‘Is this helping some poor farmer in a rural area?’ I want to create a big, successful company that will create the next wave of entrepreneurs,” Buch says. “Making a profit is a signal that we’re creating value.”