1 October 2019

1) The crown prince of Saudi Arabia, Prince Mohammed bin Salman, has warned of astronomical oil prices if tensions escalate in the Persian Gulf. In a ‘60 Minute’ interview, the Prince called for strong and firm action to deter Iran and lessen the threat to world interests, so as to avoid disruptions of oil exports. The attacks on Saudi oil production facilities caused Brent crude to jump 19.5%, the biggest jump on record. The Middle East provides about 30% of the world’s energy supplies constituting about 4% of world GDP (Gross Domestic Product).

2) In order to avoid a quarterly decline in U.S. retail sales, automakers are offering big discounts to maintain sales growth. For the last three months, auto sales have flattened with average incentive spending rising 6% to more than $4,110 per vehicle, which is a third quarter record.

3) The fashion retailer Forever 21 Inc. has filed for bankruptcy protection and is the latest big fashion merchant who, like many other retailer chains, is unable to cope with high rents and heavy competition from e-commerce. The chain has 800 stores across the world, selling affordable but eye-catching designs, but has falling out of favor with the generation-Z consumers who turn to e-commerce. The bankruptcy will allow the company to reorganize and gain additional capital for operations.

4) Stock market closings for – 30 SEP 19:

Dow              26,916.83    up    96.58
Nasdaq           7,999.34    up    59.71
S&P 500          2,976.74    up    14.95

10 Year Yield:    unchanged   at    1.68%

Oil:    $54.29

THE CAST PODCAST EP. #8 FEAT. HOLLYWOOD DOLLZ YOUTUBE ED.

THE CAST PODCAST FEAT. HOLLYWOOD DOLLS EP #8: BACK 2 SCHOOL

16 July 2019

1) Chinese economic growth has slowed to its lowest level in twenty-seven years, a result of the prolong trade war. Additionally, global growth has slowed, coupled with external uncertainties increasing. China is reporting a fall in both exports and imports for the first six months of this year. The Chinese are working on more stimulus measures to stabilize growth such as boosting infrastructure spending and interest rates cut, while also seeking loans from abroad.

2) Just like all youth, the millennials and generation-Z, have aspirations for their lives and the direction they want to go. Presently, these two groups comprise 40% of the American population, but like previous generations they disdain much about the older generation’s lives such as cars, big houses and material wealth. They want careers that make a difference even if not paying much, where they can provide some greater good to society. The fly in the ointment is their exploding student loan debt coupled with the growing obsolescence of American workers, in particular the younger ones.

3) Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant recently in the news so much, plans hundreds of layoffs in the near future. These layoffs are expected to be in Huawei’s U.S. development subsidiary Futurewei, a technology development center, which employs 850 people across several states. Blacklisted by the American government because of security risk issues, the company expects to lose $30 billion dollars in sales over the next two years.

4) Stock market closings for – 15 JUL 19: All three markets set new record highs.

Dow              27,359.16    up   27.13
Nasdaq           8,258.18    up   14.04
S&P 500          3,014.30   up      0.53

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.09%

Oil:    down   at    $59.30

IN THE NEXT DECADE MILLENNIALS & GEN Z WILL SURGE THE REAL ESTATE RENTAL MARKET……..

Image Source: Money.com

By: Economic & Finance Report

According to Yahoo Finance, Morgan Stanley real estate analysts have predicted that millenials and generation Z will account for a seven percent increase, in home ownership within the next ten years.

Lookout Gen Y’ers and Baby Boomers, Millennials and Gen Z will be outpacing you guys when it comes to real estate rentals, over the next decade.

Morgan Stanley analysts have indicated that millennials and gen Z will increase the rental market by an extra two million units within the same ten years.

Although millennials and generation z are still approx. eight percent lower in homeownership, then baby boomers and generation y; when both groups were at the same age, times are changing. -SB.

Source: Yahoo Finance, Urban Institute (2018 Housing & Finance Study)


THE CAST PODCAST EPISODE #4: MONEY, MEDIA & MANAGEMENT Feat. MELINDA SANTIAGO (SANTIAGO FIRM)

THE CAST PODCAST… Back at it again, with another banging episode for your ears. Sammy BE @EcoFireTV & Luisa L. @LuisaModels, along with Jon Don Sterling “On The Boards” @TheDramaBlock.

On this podcast episode, we had a special guest interviewee. Our guest happens to be a super manager in the music and entertainment game, her clientele ranges from Bobby V. (Bobby Valentino), Houston, Texas rap legend Scarface (Gheto Boys), R&B duo group Ruff Endz, as well as her other major accolades; we were able to interview Ms. Melinda Santiago from (The Santiago Firm).

Melinda was able to give THE CAST PODCAST, insight into the music biz and particularly on how she runs her business. She provided context of what young artists (Millennials, Gen Z) need to do to be heard and gain exposure to a global audience.

She also provided the ups and downs of the entertainment business, and the struggles women have in the music business; but also the strong backbone she has, to be able to survive and progress in this male dominated business and industry.

This is an episode you surely do not want to miss.

As always #BEBless #StayBless #GODBLESS #RealRecognizeDeal

Online Platforms To Check Out:

1) www.instagram.com/EcoFireTV (Sammy BE)
www.twitter.com/EcoFireTV

2) www.instagram.com/LuisaModels (Luisa L.)
www.twitter.com/LuisaModels

3) www.EconomicandFinanceReport.com (Economic & Finance Blog)

4) www.soundcloud.com/Economic-FinanceReport (Podcast/Online Show)

5)www.youtube.com/channel/UCWZo5bug…Nlb2VRfDCQ/videos (EFR.Tv Youtube)

6)www.SammyBuysHomes.com (Real Estate Investment)

7) www.TraderSoul.com (Financial Trading Website)

12 February 2019

New article posted below titled, “Failings of the Fourth Estate!”

1) Civil unrest continues to spread across Europe, from France, to Italy and Serbia. The yellow vest protesters in France tried to cross from France into Italy to join with the Italian protesters. Also, the protest by the separatist continues in Spain.

2) Generation-Z is doing the least preparations financially of the previous generations, only 16% doing any financial planning what so ever. They have higher credit card debt, spend big on nonessential things and have little savings.

3) The Chinese stated that trade talks are going remarkably well, giving hope that the trade war may yet be alleviated. Presently, there is a 10% tariff on $200 billion dollars, nearly half of China’s imports to the US, which will increase to 20% next week.

4) 11 FEB 19 Stock market closings:

Dow           25,053.11      down     53.22
Nasdaq       7,307.90           up        9.71
S&P 500      2,709.80           up        1.92

10 Year Yield:    up   at    2.66%

Oil:    up   at    $52.45

Failings of the Fourth Estate!

Sandra Santos and the San Antonio Express News reveals why America’s News Media declines to report about obsolete people.

James Lyman BSAE, BSEE, MSSM

Surprising . . . seldom do you hear or read about the obsolete people problem and their displacement by technology. For the millennials and generation-Z, this is a very major factor in determining what future they will have. You would think this would be the ‘story of the century’ with stories and reports abounding from America’s news media, both print and electronic, but no . . . hardly a peep! Now much of this is a result of the news media’s swing towards being ‘entertainment’, with less and less emphases on real hard core news subjects, all because of their quest for higher ratings and readership. Nevertheless, this problem must be known and understood by the youth of America if they are to have any real hope of mitigating its impact on their lives. You can’t solve problems until you understand them!

I’ve been studying and writing about this problem for a number of years, and having a very strong foundation in engineering and science, couple with being well read in history, I have a good understanding of the problems millennials and generation-Z now face. And so I decided to contact Ms. Sandra Santos, the Political and Government Editor of our local newspaper, the San Antonio Express News, and offer to talk with her while providing some of my writings on the subject. Nothing! No reply what so ever! I made other attempts at contact, both emails and traditional mailings, offering copies of my books, even lunch at my treat. Not a peep! Not even so much as a courtesy “Thanks, but no thanks”, just silence. My last attempt, I sent one of my articles detailing how jobs for American youth are quickly disappearing, with a note that in my day, a news hound would have been off and running at the first scent of a news story.

I found a couple of snapshots of Ms. Santos on the internet, and she had that look of being young, foolish and frivolous, but I didn’t feel that really explained anything. Why was it that the American news media, as typified by Ms. Santos, goes to such lengths to avoid facing the problem and doing any real reporting about technology displacement? How could anyone of responsibility be so negligent as to deliberately ignored what has been going on since the last century and continues at an ever increasing pace? Then it occurred to me the real problem was fear. Ms. Santos and others were simply too scared to face the problem and the consequences of being obsolete and pushed out of the social economic system. And that’s understandable, because since the introduction of the linotype machines in the 1890’s, the news media has itself face extensive technology displacement, which over the decades has swept large numbers of their jobs away.

For the print media, automating the printing process took away jobs . . . good paying jobs. Computers added to the displacement by automating the composition workers, those who laid out each page of the publication, word processors reducing the workers needed to write the stories, then edit them. In the 1920’s, commercial broadcasting radio was expanding, soon bringing news to the American public. After World War II, television became popular to further expand the electronic news media bringing stiff competition to the print media. By the 1960’s, this electronic competition started taking a toll on the newspapers, as more and more newspapers lost out and folded. This process continues to this day, I heard just a few months ago that another long standing newspaper in New York closed its doors. But the electronic news media has had its share of job losses from technology too, as new electronic technology has reduced the number of people needed to produce television news. Like the print media, this displacement was accelerated by the digital revolution and microchips. Then the internet opened up new avenues for electronic distribution, with the major news outlets facing news reporting by amateurs and semi-amateurs, so in the last few decades they too have lost significant numbers of jobs.

And it hasn’t ended yet!

This last year I read about two computer program systems developed to write technical reports and legal briefs. The facts and figures are entered, and the document is created in record time, without meetings, coffee and bathroom breaks, without fatigue . . . without any human punching the keys of a wordprocessor. The new AI (Artificial Intelligence) technology of IBM’s Watson could ferret out those facts and figures to pass along to the writing program, and the human reporter is left at best, working for minimum wages or as an intern.

Technology marches on, so of course, job-lost continues, and since technology doubles every fifteen years, that rate of job-lost is accelerating both for the news media and the rest of American society. So it is easy to understand why the ‘Sandra Santos’s’ of America’s news media are so careful to avoid the problem of obsolete people, for they themselves are just as much at risk as any other American. People address difficult, overwhelming problems by denial- indeed, the first stage of cancer is . . . denial . But I don’t think this is consciously done, it isn’t some conspiracy by all reporters to avoid any contact with the subject, rather I think they sense the precariousness of their position and instinctively avoid it. Hence, why there was no response what so ever to me.

The thing is, complex difficult problems do not solve themselves, so living a denial is only making things worst for themselves as well as most other Americans. Right now, alternative solutions are silently being closed off and lost as we delay facing this problem. The longer you wait to address a problem, the fewer options you have left. So while it is fully understandable why Sandra Santos and others seek the emotional shelter of denial, their fears to stand up and start facing the problem of technology displacement and obsolete people is only making it worst for all others.

I often tell people that if you want to understand what’s happening in society today, just look back a hundred and fifty years to what happen to the Native American Indians. It’s the same thing all over again . . . no real difference at all. It is past time to face up to this problem and start trying to do something about it, otherwise it’s ‘lights out’ for many of America’s millennials, generation-Z and whatever the next generation is called. It’s America’s Fourth Estate who defines and brings problems to the forefront so the government can addresses those problems. Until they start doing that, this critical problem will only continue to get worst to the determent of many Americans of all ages.

7 December 2018

1) The arrest of a top Chinese executive of Huawei, a major Chinese high technology company, caused world markets, including the Dow, to fall.  The Dow dropped 777 points before news that the Feds planned to slow down on increasing the interest rate was announced.

2) Research finds that millennials don’t have the money to spend that previous generations had.  The assumption has been a shift in spending habits, but with a millennial male making $6,600 dollars less than 1978 men, it appears they just don’t have the disposable income.  Working women haven’t made up the difference, opening the question about the future viability of our hyper-consumerism economy.

3) The EPA is expected to rollback back emission standards allowing coal fire powerplants to operate again without having to remove the carbon dioxide from burning coal.

4) 6 DEC 18     Stock market closings:

Dow                24,947.67         down      79.40
Nasdaq             7,188.26               up      29.83
S&P 500            2,695.95          down        4.11

10 Year Yield:     down   at   2.88%

Oil:    up   at     $51.52

26 November 2018

1) The government released a report on climate change and the adverse effects to be expected.  The US GPD may decline as much as 10% by 2100. It acknowledge that the US is not the only driving force of global warming, as of now, not a single G20 country is meeting their climate targets.  The costs of climate change could reach hundreds of billions of dollars annually, with agriculture predominate where farms may produce 75% less corn and 25% less soybeans.

2) The Dow may drop another 2,000 points before market selling is done.  The US economic growth could be cut in half this next year over fears of consumer demand declining.

3) A family feud threatens Campbell’s dynasty as soup sales tank, with one cousin complaining to another cousin that he didn’t have any confidence in the company management, which precipitated a feud.  Shareholders vote next Thursday, that will determine if Campbell’s will remain a family dynasty.

4) 23 NOV 18    Stock market closings:     Drop in oil prices causes drop in stock markets.

Dow                         24,285.95         down         178.74
Nasdaq                      6,938.98         down            33.27
S&P 500                     2,632.56         down            17.37

10 Year Yield:      down   at    3.05%

Oil:    down   at    $50.39

The Problems Millennials are Facing

A list of the problems the Millennials and Z-Generation are now facing in their future.

James Lyman BSAE, BSEE, MSSM

The youth of America, the millennials and Z-Generation, are now facing a number of serious problems that are shaping their lives and future, both near and far term.  Here is a short list of the most profound and critical problems they are facing:

1) Obsolescence Technology is growing exponentially, doubling every fifteen years.  Most Americans are failing to advance, that is, most have gone no further than the nineteenth century.  Therefore, more and more Americans are unable to make substantive contributions to society.

2) Technology Displacement Going hand in hand with Obsolescence is displacement by technology.  The replacement of humans by machines and technology, leaving people with minimal to no jobs.  Each passing day, more of America’s youth are not needed, not wanted, not having any real value to society.

3) Diminishing Resources The availability of resources such as natural minerals and resources, water, energy, oil . . . in particular the oil, and negative resources of pollution and trash is a continual source of problems for young Americans, both for shortages in domestic America and world competition to obtain and hold those resources.

4) Increasingly Threatening World With the end of the cold war, many felt that world peace was finally at hand, but increasingly there are threats of war across the world.  The Middle East, China and the Pacific Rim, Russia and the adjacent Eastern European countries, all are tender boxes where armed conflict can erupt. In these modern times, wars are no longer isolated affairs, instead ripples reach out across the world to affect other nations at least economically.

5) Fragile World Economies Much to the consternation of many Americans, young and old, America’s economy is tightly coupled with other country’s economies across the world, friend and foe. And it’s been this way since the start of the twentieth century, having become increasingly more interdependent.  The economies of countries such as Italy, Spain, Greece, Portugal and China are prime examples of countries with fragile economies, where sever economic problems or collapse will have profound impact on many other countries including the United States.

6) Climate Change There is a lot of daily debate about global warming and climate change, much of it revolving around people’s aversions to the high technology world they are trying to live in.  What the scientist are saying in Scientific American and Science News is that yes, there probably is climate change, the extent and effects unknown, and yes human activity may be a factor, but how much is unknown.  As with so many problems, there is a false perception of climate change being a political problem.  It’s a political problem if and only if, the legislative process has significant control over the forces driving the problem.  Climate change is a result of massive over population of a species- and that’s US . . . the 7.5 billion humans now living. The political systems does not have any real control over the most important forcing function of this problem.

7) Government Nonperformance As with any other organization, the larger the organization becomes, the more sluggish and non-responsive it becomes. This very much holds true for governments . . . Federal, state and local. Nonperformance translates into not addressing problems faced by the people. You seldom hear any government people talking about things like technology displacement and obsolescence of people, indeed they are usually very careful to avoid the topics. Yet, these and other subjects are having a very profound effect on the future of most Americans, and the younger they are, the more likely a detrimental impact to their lives.

8) Stability of American Economy Probably the most important and critical factor for the young people of America is how stable the economy remains.  The near collapse of the world’s economies in 2008 shows how susceptible people of all economic strata, are to the stability of economies.  Anytime there are upheavals in the business world, then fissures and holes open up which allows technology to flow into the economy creating obsolete people and their displacement by technology.

There are other lesser problems on this list, but those listed above are most profoundly effecting the greatest number of people, and will most likely aversely impact the future of the millennials and Z-Generation.  While Obsolescence and Technology Displacement are at the top of the list, which they rightly should be, both are interleaved with all the other problems to some extent.  One factor that is greatly hindering any real progress in addressing these problems, is the assumption that all problems are a political problem which can be addressed with the techniques of political activism.  You see that with the global warming problem, where advocates are using the techniques of political activism, such as public education, spots on news stories to cultivate public opinion, countering any challenges in public debate, campaigning for political support and meeting with political leaders to garner their support. All fine and well, but as pointed out in item 6, Climate Change, the principle driving force of the problem is massive over population, and the political process has no real effective control over that.

And this highlights the real problem for millennials and the Z-generation, and that’s the poor education and problem solving skills of so may who are involved with the above list.  Failing to first identify the forces acting on a system shows a near complete lack of real problem solving skills, thus ensuring failure of any attempts to address problems.  And that’s really where the young of America stand today . . . a number of very serious problems which is detrimental to their generation . . . and no one able to really address any of those problems.