18 November 2020

1) Crude oil prices and energy stocks aren’t the only things that have fallen during this oil downturn, land prices with potential oil shale have also plummeted. The average price of U.S. oil shale acreage has fallen by more than 70 percent in two years, falling from $17,000 per acre in 2018 to $5,000 per acre in 2020. The value of oil and gas assets has plunged because of the coronavirus pandemic sending crude oil demand down globally, consequently most energy companies are slashing their costs instead of purchasing new land for oil and gas drilling. Oil and gas companies are forced to sell assets to make up money lost on deals.

2) On January the first of next year, President Trump’s pause on student loan payments for 33 million Americans is set to expire, just three weeks before President-elect Joe Biden is slated to take over. The Education Department is warning borrowers this week that their monthly payments will resume. For the incoming president, the economic and administrative mess could take months to untangle, consuming the early days of his Education Department. The student loan system was not designed to start and stop at any time for 30 million borrowers. This became apparent in March when loan payments were suspending and problems for borrowers quickly arose. This is just one facet of the economic problems facing the new president in just a few months, that not only must be addressed, but addressed correcting if problems are not to get worst.

3) The United States has surpassed 11 million coronavirus cases , that’s 1 million new infections in just one week, or 2 million since the beginning of the month. Consequently, hospitals are reaching a breaking point trying to treat nearly 70,000 Covid-19 patients. Medical workers are tired . . . mentally, physically and emotionally exhausted. The stress is being felt around the nation, with the virus spreading like wildfire and the medical system having no backup. If you act early, you can save lives, but if you don’t, you’ll be swamped by a tsunami of this virus. But a Covid-19 vaccine may be in the making with Moderna announcing it has developed a vaccine that’s nearly 95% effective, capable of preventing severe illness, and it could start giving vaccinations to high-risk patients and health care workers as soon as December. A week before, drugmaker, Pfizer announced that its human trials suggest its coronavirus vaccine is more than 90% effective.

4) Stock market closings for – 17 NOV 20:

Dow 29,783.35 down 167.09
Nasdaq 11,899.34 down 24.79
S&P 500 3,609.53 down 17.38

10 Year Yield: down at 0.87%

Oil: down at $41.40

16 June 2020

1) The markets sank Monday, down by 762 points, when the news of the Feds bond-buying plan became known, reversing the selling to buying which raised the Dow up 150 points. The downward slide was from fears of a second round of the Convid-19 virus with the possibility of more economic damage. The plan is for the Federal Reserve to buy individual corporate bonds, on top of the exchange traded funds it is already buying. This is a move to ease credit conditions to further stimulate the economy. The program can buy up to $750 billion dollars worth of corporate credit, which the Feds can buy on the secondary market, individual bonds that have maturities of five or less years. Bonds is how corporations typically fund their operations and expansion using debt, and this program will ease debt for corporations allowing them to grow more and provide jobs.

2) The oil giant BP (British Petroleum) has signaled to investors that the economic shock of the pandemic will reverberate for years. This in turn means less gas and oil needed by the world in the future. The company is expected to write down $17.5 Billion dollars of its oil and gas holdings this next quarter, meaning they are worth less in the future than what they are worth today. The coronavirus pandemic has caused steep declines in demand for gas and oil worldwide, and this is expected to last for a number of years. This write down is in the approximate class of the Deepwater horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, which was $32 billion dollars.

3) Britain’s Brexit, the planned exit of Britain from the European Union, has been overshadowed by the world wide pandemic, but nevertheless Brexit trade talks have continued. But the talks have reached an impasse. Britain left the union at the end of January, but had not reached agreements on traded with the other European countries. Although Britain left the union, the two economies have continued operating as before Brexit, so there has been little changed in trading. But this is only to the end of the year, and with Britain a major trader of goods with Europe, it’s important to reach agreements before that time comes. One major point of contention is how future disagreements will be adjudicated or arbitrated.

4) Stock market closings for – 15 JUN 20:

Dow 25,763.16 up 157.62
Nasdaq 9,726.02 up 137.21
S&P 500 3,066.59 up 25.28

10 Year Yield: unchanged at 0.70%

Oil: up at $37.07

27 May 2020

1) The local economies of oil country are being hit hard by the shale oil bust as royalties from oil pumped have shrank to near insignificance. While the oil bust has erased tens of thousands of jobs, while drying up local tax revenues, it has also greatly reduced the inflow of money to local economies from the royalties being paid out. There are about 12 million U.S. mineral owners collecting royalties for oil and gas extracted from their land. Royalties range from 12.5% to 25% of the value of gas and oil pumped, with the average oil land owner collecting about $500 dollars a month.

2) The coronavirus pandemic is causing more economic troubles with increased prices at supermarkets. The virus caused unprecedented demand, the shutdown of some food manufacturing facilities and the need for more labor to assemble orders for pickup and delivery are adding to costs of the grocery business. Since supermarket’s get all their money from the checkout lanes, this translates into higher grocery prices. Some say the grocery business will never be the same again. Furthermore, with demand driven so high by the pandemic, stores have no need to offer incentives and sales. This demand has been felt up the supply chain further increasing cost. One note, the pickup and delivery business of groceries has been catapulted ahead bringing automation to the grocery business closer.

3) The New York Stock Exchange has started a phased reopening of its trading floor, having been closed for two months because of the pandemic crisis. The NYSE has been limited to all electronic trading since March 23 in a measure to prevent the spread of the virus. But there will be fewer floor brokers, and they will wear face masks and do social distancing. Nevertheless, many brokers will continue to do their jobs remotely with electronics, and stay away from the trading floor. Another example of how American business has been changed by the need to keep people spaced apart, even isolated in order to halt the spread of the virus.

4) Stock market closings for – 26 MAY 20:

Dow 24,995.11 up 529.95
Nasdaq 9,340.22 up 15.63
S&P 500 2,991.77 up 36.32

10 Year Yield: up at 0.70%

Oil: up at $34.18

27 December 2019

1) The Permian Basin continues to experience difficulties producing oil, becoming increasingly gassy as drilling slows down. This undercuts profits for producers at a time when investors are demanding better returns. The region has long been plagued with a massive glut of gas which crude producers must sometimes pay to have hauled away or burn in the open air. This problem is intensifying as wells age and fewer new wells are drilled.

2) Oil prices rise to a three month high because of optimism on supply. The stage is set for the biggest monthly gain in almost a year on speculation that supplies are shrinking. Prices are up almost 12% for this month and are now higher since the mid-September high. The U.S. stockpiles have dropped 7.9 million barrels this last week, while Russia cut their crude output with a reduction of 240,000 barrels a day for December. Oil has surged about 36% for this year.

3) American retailers continue to struggle while some are actually thriving. The once giant Sears has fallen into bankruptcy having closed over 3,000 stores. Other major retailers in decline are Blockbuster Video, Radioshack, Victoria’s Secret, the Gap, JCPenny, Toys R Us and Borders Books. Retailers such as TJ Maxx, Amazon, Walmart, Target, Dollar General, Costco and Ross have flourished in the peril waters of American consumerism.

4) Stock market closings for – 26 DEC 19:

Dow                28,621.39    up    105.94
Nasdaq             9,022.39    up      69.51
S&P 500            3,239.91    up      16.53

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.90%

Oil:    up   at     $61.68

5 September 2019

1) A federal judge has ruled that investors may sue five big banks for conspiring to rig prices on bonds worth hundreds of billions of dollars issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for a seven year period. This clears the way for investors to pursue antitrust claims against Bank of America, BNP Paribas SA, Deutsche Bank AG, Goldman Sachs Group and Morgan Stanley. The banks are accused of fixing prices at a specific level before bringing the bonds to the secondary market.

2) The U.S. trade deficit narrowed overall slightly in July, however the gap with China surged to a six-month high. The trade tensions have caused wild swings in the trade deficit as exporters and importers try to stay ahead of the tariff fight between America and China. The Atlanta Federal Reserve is forecasting the economy growing at a 1.7% pace in the third quarter.

3) Oil dependent nations are facing economic troubles because gas and oil production are unsustainable. As oil and gas supplies dwindle and demand decreases, their once lucrative revenues may be decreasing. Nations whose economies are principally oil production face a trouble future as their oils supplies decline in the next few decades, with nothing to replace those revenues. Those nations facing economic troubles are the UAE, Nigeria, Qatar, Libya, Angola, Kuwait, Venezuela, Iraq and Saudi Arabia.

4) Stock market closings for – 4 SEP 19:

Dow            26,355.47    up    237.45
Nasdaq        7,976.88    up    102.72
S&P 500       2,937.78    up    31.51

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.46%

Oil:    down   at    $55.98

BLACK RHINO (BLACKSTONE’S AFRICA DIVISION) HIRES EMIR LAMIDO SANUSI AS CHAIR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Emir Sanusi

By: Economic & Finance Report

Black Rhino (Blackstone’s Africa equity unit) has hired Mr. Lamido Sanusi, Emir of Kano and former Nigeria Central Bank Governor. Blackstone is working with Aliko Dangote and the Dangote Group in producing gas pipelines from the southern part of Nigeria (primarily the Niger Delta region) heading to the southwest, toward Lagos state. The  Dangote Group will invest $2.5 billion dollar toward the project.

Emir Sanusi will be heading the Black Rhino’s Board of Director’s as the Chairman, assisting in an advisory role as well as producing recommendations. This comes in a time where Nigeria and the rest of Africa are figuring ways to cut off the dependency on oil and focus in other means to factor in energy. In Nigeria, gas seems to be a viable alternative as the country transitions from becoming so dependent on oil. -SB 

Oil plunges 3 percent to new five-year lows after bearish IEA outlook

Oil plunges 3 percent to new five-year lows after bearish IEA outlook

Reuters

A customer uses a petrol nozzle to fill up his tank in a gas station at a supermarket in Truchtersheim near Strasbourg
A customer uses a petrol nozzle to fill up his tank in a gas station at a supermarket in Truchtersheim near Strasbourg August 26, 2012. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler
NEW YORK (Reuters) – Crude oil markets fell 3 percent or more to plumb new five-year lows on Friday after the world’s energy watchdog forecast even lower prices on weaker demand and larger supplies next year.

Benchmark Brent oil settled at below $62 a barrel and U.S. crude slumped to under $58 to extend Thursday’s landmark fall below $60.

Surging crude inventories in the United States and top oil exporter Saudi Arabia’s reiteration that it will not cut production had roiled prices over the last two days despite data pointing to strong U.S. economic recovery.

On Friday, the Paris-based International Energy Agency which coordinates the energy policies of industrialised countries, cut its outlook for demand growth in 2015, triggering another collapse.

The IEA slashed its outlook for global oil demand growth for 2015 by 230,000 barrels per day to 900,000 bpd on expectations of lower fuel consumption in Russia and other oil-exporting countries.

It predicted that oil-producing nations outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries will add to global supplies. It also expected prices to fall further.

“That’s just more bad news for the oil markets,” said Andrew Lipow, president of Houston-based Lipow Oil Associates.

Brent settled down $1.83, or nearly 3 percent, at $61.85 per barrel. It fell to $61.35 during the session, the lowest since July 2009.

U.S. crude finished down $2.14, or 3.6 percent, at $57.81. It fell earlier to $57.34, its lowest since May 2009.

On the week, Brent lost more than $7, or about 11 percent. U.S. crude tumbled over $8, or 12 percent.

Both markets have lost about 46 percent of their value since their June highs, when Brent stood at above $115 and U.S. crude at around $107.

The IEA outlook had a greater impact on Friday’s market than data from U.S. oil services firm Baker Hughes showing the number of rigs drilling for oil in the United States were down by 29 this week, the biggest weekly drop in two years.

Voluminous crude from U.S. shale projects has been blamed for much of the global oil glut now, and energy traders have been watching rig data to see if prices that have almost halved since June will prompt a cutback in drilling.

Regulators in North Dakota, one of the largest shale oil producing states in the United States, also said on Friday the state’s crude production held steady in October despite strict new rules that aim to prevent wasteful burning of natural gas produced alongside oil.

(Additional reporting by Simon Falush in London and Adam Rose in Beijing; Editing by Marguerita Choy and Gunna Dickson)