3 November 2020

1) With the pandemic, working at home became the sudden norm, but now companies are starting to think ‘remote work’ isn’t that great after all. Companies are finding that projects take longer, collaboration is harder, and the training of new workers is a struggle. While many companies thought remote working would be the future, giving many cost savings, they now say this is not going to be sustainable. Some companies had even decided to give up their physical office spaces entirely, which would be a big savings in operating cost. The early productivity gains that companies witnessed with remote work has peaked and leveled off. Few companies expect remote work to go away in the near term, though the evolving thinking among many CEOs reflects a significant shift from the early days of the pandemic.

2) As oil prices continue to tumble, there are world wide concerns about oil and its effect on economies. Global oil inventories fell at a rate of about 2 million barrels a day in September and October, and that trend will probably continue, as demand unexpectedly fell from the lockdown measures. The European Union is accelerating the transition away from fossil fuels, one of its members still sees its own small oil industry continuing for a decade or more.

3) From the start, all electric automobiles have been plagued by their high cost, but now Ford motor company says they have an affordable $20,000 electric car in the mix. This gives a cost on price parity with traditional vehicles using an internal-combustion engine. Ford is returning to its roots with cars for the common working man, having costs for buyers that will range between $20,000 to $70,000 avoiding the sky-high price tags of other electric cars. Ford is expecting future EVs to account for over 10% of the company’s revenue in the future. The Ford Mustang Mach-E was introduce this year, while the electric F-150 EV pickup is set for a debut in 2022. Ford expects to offer a full lineup of electric commercial vehicles in the future, but a $20,000 EV could be just the ticket to get battery-powered cars into the mainstream.

4) Stock market closings for – 2 NOV 20:
Dow 26,925.05 up by 423.45
Nasdaq 10,957.61 up by 46.02
S&P 500 3,310.24 up by 40.28
10 Year Yield: down at 0.85%
Oil: up at $37.09

1 October 2020

1) After two previous recalls for Mustangs and Super Duty pickups, Ford has announced a third recall of nearly every new vehicle it sells today, a total of about 620,246 vehicles for dysfunctional (blank picture) backup cameras. All 2020 models are being recalled, the Ford Explorer, F-150 pickups, Mustang, Transit, Super Duty pickups, Expedition, Escape, Range and Edge. The only exception is the Ecosport. All have defective back up camera systems that can go dark or have a flickering image. Backup cameras are federally mandated, and therefore Ford vehicles don’t comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards and therefore must be repaired.
2) Disney has announced it is laying off 28,000 employees in the U.S., a direct result of the pandemic’s effects on its theme parks. The laid-off employees comprise 67% of their part time workers and will affect Disney’s Parks, Experiences and Products unit. The parks and resorts division has more than 100,000 U.S. employees. On shutting down its theme parks globally this spring, Disney’s profits dropped a whopping 91% for the first three months of 2020. The theme parks have been impacted, a result of the limited capacity from physical distancing requirements and the continued uncertainty of the duration of the pandemic.
3) Nigeria is overhauling its State Oil Company and may sell a stake in the company. Nigeria is Africa’s biggest crude oil producer so the sale of shares is a big deal. The Nigerian government seeks to establish a commercially oriented and profit driven national petroleum company, which generates about half of the government’s revenue and more than 90% of its export earnings. The company has for years been a tool for political patronage to cronies, with its closed operations fueling corruption. Being a publicly traded company sheds the cloak of secrecy by opening the books for inspection thereby making corruption more difficult and likely to be detected.
4) Stock market closings for – 30 SEP 20:
Dow 27,781.70 up 329.04
Nasdaq 11,167.51 up 82.26
S&P 500 3,363.00 up 27.53
10 Year Yield: 0.68% up 0.03
Oil: up at $39.86

21 July 2020

1) Another major U.S. airline, Southwest Airlines, is facing reduction in staff as the airline business continues to contract with little expectation of returning to its pre-corona days of business. About 24% of Southwest pilots and 33% of flight attendants have agreed to early retirement or long term leaves of absence. This accounts for about 4,400 employees who have decided to leave permanently with another 12,500 for extended emergency time off. Southwest is trying to avoid its first involuntary job cuts in its 49 year history. The company says that passenger numbers will have to triple by year end to eliminate the need for layoffs. There is growing evidence that the airline business is fundamentally changing.

2) The freight truck company TuSimple is building the world’s first network of self driving delivery trucks by 2024. The autonomous semi truck-trailers will operate across the America. TuSimple has partnered with UPS, Penske Truck Leasing, US Xpress and McLane for this autonomous freight network project. TuSimple is creating digital routes, terminals and a monitoring system in three phases that tracks its truck. Phase I is until end of 2021 to bring autonomous trucking services to Phoenix and Tucson in Arizona, plus El Paso, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio in Texas. Phase II, from 2022 till 2023, will expand the network coast to coast with a line from Los Angeles to Jacksonville in Florida. Finally, phase III between 2023 and 2024, will expand service nation wide to 48 states.

3) Both automakers GM and Ford have lost 27% of their market value this year, while electric car maker Tesla continues its unbelievable rise in the market. The reasons for the decline are different for the two companies. Ford sales relied too heavily on the F-150. While GM continues to sell more cars in the U.S. and worldwide, it’s hammered by the pandemic and failure in China, the world’s largest car market.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 JUL 20:

Dow 26,680.87 up 8.92 %
Nasdaq 10,767.09 up 263.90
S&P 500 3,251.84 up 27.11

10 Year Yield: down at 0.62%

Oil: up at $40.70

6 July 2020

1) Newest job report is out with America gaining 4.8 million jobs as people return from the shutdown to work again. This gives an unemployment rate of 11.1%, which is still in the recession category, but is coming down over time. These returning jobs were mostly in the restaurant, hotel and retail sectors. There remains the question of how many restaurant jobs will finally return, with significant numbers of privately own businesses failing financially because of the shutdown.

2) The cornerstone of Ford’s reorganization, its F series Ford pickups, has dropped 22% in sales. Most of these are the F-150 full size pickups, with a new version just recently released. Total Ford sales are down 33.3%, with Ford executives making it clear just how critical the F-150 is to the future of Ford. Before the pandemic crisis set in, Ford had implemented a major restructuring of its operations intent on remaining a strong profitable company, and had expected to pay for this plan in part with the strong sales of the F-150. The F series models have been a part of Ford’s product line since 1948.

3) It’s reported that the developing world loses billions of dollars in money from migrant workers. These migrant workers range from Polish farmhands in the fields of southern France, to Filipino workers on cruise ships in the Caribbean, almost all of them losing their jobs because of the pandemic shutdown. These workers routinely sent cash home, so the third world economy is suffering too. Migrant workers comprise tens of millions of Indians, Filipinos, Mexicans and others from the developing countries, who sent a record $554 billion dollars back home last year. This is more than three times the development aid from foreign governments. Family members depend on this cash to pay for food, fuel and medical care. This drop in money sent home is four times the fall in the 2008 Great Recession.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 JUL 20:

Dow 25,827.36 up 92.39
Nasdaq 10,207.63 up 53.00
S&P 500 3,130.01 up 14.15

10 Year Yield: down at 0.67%

Oil: unchanged $40.32 back home

25 June 2020

1) There are ten companies that may not make it through the summer. These are high brand names of Hertz, J.C. Penney, Pier 1 Imports, Tuesday Morning, J. Crew, Neiman Marcus, Gold’s Gym, Tailored Brands (Men’s Warehouse and Jos. A. Banks) and Diamond Offshore Drilling, which are all in bankruptcy now. The high number of retailers shows the ongoing retail apocalypse with the retail sector, which had already hit before the pandemic by falling sales, lower costumer traffic and too many stores. Retail was near the edge of collapsed with last years Christmas holiday shopping doing little to boost business, especially those located in malls. Last year, 9,500 retail stores closed, with estimates of 15,000 stores closing for good in 2020. This may indicated a fundamental shift in America’s economy, a shift away from hyper-consumerism to something else besides a service based economy. Shopper visits to stores are about half of last year’s numbers, and that’s with businesses reopening after more than two months on lockdown.

2) Fears continue to grow that we are not finished with the Convid-19 crisis yet, as the number of new cases continues to increase. This is happening with states and cities easing their shutdown measures to reopen the economy to start a recovery. The seven day average of new virus cases has swung up 30% from a week ago. It was hoped the warm weather would suppress the virus spread as it does with the flu, but if the virus is resurrecting, then the shutdown may need to returned with the resulting economic impact.

3) The Ford Motor Co., who is in the process of its global restructuring plan and paying off debt related to the coronavirus pandemic, is betting its future on its new line of pickups. Ford is offering its popular F-150 model in traditional internal combustion engines, new hybrids and all electric versions. The Ford F-150 has been the country’s top selling truck for more than 40 years, the best selling for the last consecutive 38 years. Their F-150 is a key part in Ford’s plans to profitably grow their business, to help in the $11 billion restructuring cost and pay off the $20 billion dollars in new debt.

4) Stock market closings for – 24 JUN 20:

Dow 25,445.94 down 710.16
Nasdaq 9,909.17 down 222.20
S&P 500 3,050.33 down 0.96

10 Year Yield: down at 0.68%

Oil: down at $38.07

23 April 2020

1) The present unemployment rate is thought to be higher than anytime during the Great Depression, raising the question if the present day recession will last as long as the Depression, which was almost ten years. While some sever recessions have been short lived, usually they are long affairs. Lowering the interest rates is a traditional tool used by the government to counter a recession and stimulate the economy, but interest rates are already near zero when the coronavirus hit, so the government didn’t have its primary tool. Many economist are considering the strategy ‘America is back open for business’ as unlikely to create a huge surge in growth. There are three other major factors to consider- 1) the other world economies are continually pulling America’s down 2) the big mess that oil is in and 3) predictions from several different experts that in the next 15 to 25 years as much as 50% of the jobs will disappear to technology. It will be difficult for employment to return to pre-coronavirus levels if jobs are continually disappearing faster than people are being rehired. One interesting point, a financial analyst is predicting that Disney World, Disneyland and their overseas parks will not be able to reopen until January 2021, and if such a cash rich company is having so much difficulty reopening, how about the multitude of smaller companies with much more limited resources?

2) U.S. automakers are taking the first steps to bring workers back and start manufacturing operations again, but are finding it easier said than done. There are negotiations with the United Auto Workers union, for the manufactures to provide protective gear, frequently sanitize equipment and take worker temperatures to prevent infection of the virus to the union members. As much as workers want to return to a paycheck, there are real fears of catching the virus. Fiat Chrysler has announced May 4 as the gradual restart date, with General Motors and Ford expected to quickly follow.

3) Reports are building that the coronavirus may cause lasting damage to some organs such as the kidneys. There are fears from reports that the virus may cause damage to the heart, lungs and possibly the liver. Furthermore, the blood from Covid-19 patients is having unprecedented blood clotting, evident by blood clots forming while trying to insert IVs or taking blood samples. Internal blood clots can be life threatening, and autopsies are finding such internal blood clots.

4) Stock market closings for – 22 APR 20:

Dow 23,475.82 up 456.94
Nasdaq 8,495.38 up 232.15
S&P 500 2,799.31 up 62.75

10 Year Yield: up at 0.62%

Oil: up at $14.23

5 February 2020

1) As the coronavirus continues the slowing of China’s economy, coupled with a general slow down in world economies, world oil prices are dropping. China is the world’s largest oil importer, with speculation that if oil continues to drop, America can expect a drop in gasoline prices, possibly going below $2 a gallon.

2) The credit card company Visa is planning major changes to the rates U.S. merchants pay to accept its cards. These changes are the biggest changes in a decade, with Visa hoping to encourage people to abandon checks and cash. Higher rates are coming for transactions on e-commerce sites, while certain retailers such as real estate and education will see lower rates. Retailers have long complained about the $100 billion plus dollars they spend each year to accept electronic payments.

3) Ford Motor Co. has posted a fourth quarter loss and provided weaker than expected 2020 forecast due to continued higher warranty cost, lower vehicle volumes, lower results from Ford Credit branch, and higher investment in future transportation. This is coming at a time when Ford and other automakers are making huge investments in producing a line of electric cars and trucks. For the fourth quarter, Ford is reporting a net loss of $1.7 billion dollars, or 42 cents a share. Revenue for the fourth quarter was down 5% to $39.7 billion dollars.

4) Stock market closings for – 4 FEB 20:

Dow                   28,807.63    up    407.82
Nasdaq                9,467.97    up    194.57
S&P 500               3,297.59    up      48.67

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.60%

Oil:    down   at    $49.45

TESLA’S MARKET VALUE SURPASSES FORD MOTORS & GENERAL MOTORS MARKET SHARE VALUE COMBINED!

Image Credit: NBCNews.com

By: Economic & Finance Report

Breaking News: Tesla Inc market value has now surpassed both legendary Ford Motors and General Motors company market values combined.

January 8, 2020 (Wednesday) Tesla Inc had a market cap of $89 billion, approx 2 more billion dollars then Ford Motors ($50 billion) and General Motors ($37 billion) combined.

Many of Tesla Inc’s attributes for rising market cap has to be with a profitable 3rd quarter the electrical auto maker had; also surpassing auto deliveries in the Chinese market, while also having its stock more then double over the past few months. These all seem to be contributing factors to its increased market cap currently.

With all the accolades Tesla has achieved, there are skeptics in the investment community who believe the company will not able to sustain cash flow nor provide more profitability in the next few years.

All this remains to be seen...SB

26 November 2019

1) America’s largest manufacturer of truck engines plans to lay off 2,000 workers. Orders for heavy duty trucks is down last year by 51%. This market dip is forcing Cummins Diesel to cut back on its production, reducing its 62,610 workforce by the 2,000. The company is forced to do a more aggressively cost cutting program because the down turn is happening faster than anticipated. Other manufactures of parts and assemblies, such as drivetrains, braking and axles used in large trucks are also forced into layoffs and bankruptcies.

2) The national debt has just passed $23 trillion dollars the first of November. This is a record high for the amount of money owed by the Federal government brought on by the growing budget deficits and is roughly equal to the Chinese, Japanese and German economies combined. Both parties have abandoned fiscal conservative spending and are intent on spending more on the domestic and military fronts, a contest over promises of who will spend more while cutting taxes.

3) The Ford Motor Company has $37 billion dollars in cash and short term assets on its balance sheet , but is strapped for cash. This makes Ford one of the top ten U. S. companies flush with cash. But Ford faces so many future challenges, it must hold onto every penny it can. First is a major multi-year restructuring, principally in Europe and South America. Also, Ford is overdue to refresh its key vehicles, including the company’s best selling F series pickup trucks, which will cost several billion dollars. Finally, Ford’s efforts to join the rush into electric vehicles, with seven new electric models due by the end of 2020.

4) Stock market closings for – 25 NOV 19:

Dow               28,066.47    up    190.85
Nasdaq           8,632.49     up    112.60
S&P 500          3,133.64     up       23.35

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.76%

Oil:    down   at   $57.91

4 September 2019

1) The ever present problem of growing student debt is being aggravated by the ever rising cost of college. This rise in cost is fueled by decreasing funding by governments, a lack of cost controls by college administrations and an emphases on plush facilities instead of real education support.

2) Manufacturing shrank in August for the first time since August 2016. The manufacturing index slid to 49.1 from 51.2 in July, where an index below 50 signals a contraction. Production declined by 1.3 percent while employment fell by 4.3 percent with new orders falling by 3.6 percent. With the trade war increasing the cost of Chinese manufactured imports, it would be expected that American manufacturing would be increasing.

3) The United Auto Workers union is targeting GM for contract talks, with the UAW approving a strike. The UAW represents nearly 150,000 hourly workers at Ford, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler with 96% of it’s workers OKing a strike. Leaders of the UAW are under investigation for corruption by the FBI who have conducted raids on key leadership members recently for mis use of monies. The union is angry at GM for layoffs and the closing of plants, plus production plants in Mexico.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 SEP 19:

Dow              26,118.02    down    285.26
Nasdaq           7,874.16    down      88.72
S&P 500          2,906.27    down       20.19

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.47%

Oil:    down   at    $53.90