4 October 2019

1) MGM Resorts has reached agreement with families of victims who were killed in the October 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas. The settlement for the 2,500 family victims will be almost $800 million dollars with the agreement that all pending litigation against MGM will be dismissed. The shooting left 58 dead while wounding hundreds of others.

2) Soon to be implemented, tariffs will make imports more expensive for Americans, such as Scotch and Irish whiskies, Parmesan cheese and French wine. The tariffs will be on $7.5 billion dollars of European imports. Further tariffs are threaten over aircraft subsidies by the European Union, coming at a time when economies have been hurt by the US-China trade war. The World Trade Organization has ruled America can impose tariffs because the European Union has failed to abide by earlier ruling of Airbus subsidies.

3) The service-sector activity in the U.S. slowed to its weakest pace in three years this September. This is another sign that the U.S. economy may be weakening where the services sector accounts for more than two thirds of economic activity. The non-manufacturing index fell to 52.6 last month, which was the lowest reading since August 2016 and far below the 55.3 expectations.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 OCT 19:

Dow                 26,201.04    up    122.42
Nasdaq              7,872.26    up      87.02
S&P 500             2,910.63    up      23.02

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.54%

Oil:    down   at    $52.34

8 April 2019

1) The European Union has offered to extended the exit date in an effort to avoid a unplanned crash-out. Prime Minister May asked for an extension to 30 June, but the EU countered with a offer for a one year extension, which could be terminated early if an exit plan is agreed upon before the one year is up.

2) Samsung has forecast the lowest quarter profits in more than two years. The first quarter outlook looks ugly with a 15% decline from last years first quarter. The poor performance is a result of poor semiconductor sales coupled with a slowing growth in the smart phone market.

3) New jobs in March is six times that of February. The US added 196,000 new jobs, many claiming this indicates solid growth in the economy, and therefore the economy is doing just fine. But some worry about the unemployment rate holding steady, because an upturn in the unemployment rate usually signals a recession in the near future.

4) 5 APR 10 Stock market closings:

 Dow           26,424.99     up    40.36
Nasdaq        7,938.69     up    46.91
S&P 500       2,892.74     up     13.35

10 Year Yield:     down   at    2.50%

Oil:    up   at    $63.26

27 March 2019

1) British parliament voted to take control of Brexit for one day this Wednesday, to try their hand at resolving Britain’s dilemma of departing the European Union. If the division running through the British public is any indicator, then it’s rather unlikely parliament will reach any consensus on a solution.

2) Airbus of France announced a $35 billion dollar sale to China for 290 of their A320 airliners plus another 10 of their A350 wide body airliners. This is another blow to Boeing in addition to the grounding of their best seller, the 737 MAX 8, which is comparable to the A320. The grounding of the 737 MAX 8 coupled with the fallout from the US-China’s trade war is a serious impediment to Boeing. China is the world’s largest aviation market.

3) Apple sales in China has declined due to demand for domestic products. Apple products have become too expensive, so the Chinese people are turning to domestic products which now have most of the same features as Apple for much less.

4) 26 MAR 19 Stock market closings:

Dow         25,657.73      up    140.90
Nasdaq       7,691.52      up       53.98
S&P 500      2,818.46      up      20.10

10 Year Yield:     down   at    2.41%

Oil:     up   at    $60.04

7 March 2019

1) The economic balance in US trade deficient soared last year to $621 billion dollars, the highest level in ten years. Exports from the US fell 1.9% while imports rose 2.1%. The deficient with China was $419 billion dollars. The strong US economy is considered a factor in the increase of the imbalance.

2) Italy’s experiment with Universal Basic Income is having dismal results, with Italy’s poverty and unemployment rising. The intent of the program was to alleviate poverty and address it’s high unemployment, for Italy has the highest unemployment rate in Europe. Finland tried the same scheme, but scraped it’s program after two years. The European Union is taking exception to Italy’s spending habits.

3) The General Motor’s Lordstown plant is shutting down with the loss of 5,400 jobs. This shows that despite the booming job market in America, the economy is still leaving people behind. Major problem is the workers are older and lack the computer and technical knowledge to retrain for other job fields.

4) 6 MAR 19 Stock market closings:

Dow               25,673.46       down       133.17
Nasdaq            7,505.92       down         70.44
S&P 500           2,771.45       down         18.20

10 Year Yield:     down   at   2.69%

Oil:     down   at    $56.15

1 March 2019

1) Apple announced they are laying off 190 people from their self driving car division. These includes forty hardware engineers, twelve software engineers and one machine shop technician. Speculation is that Apple is pulling out of the self driving car competition. They hadn’t actually built a working self driving car, rather they have reportedly concentrated on the sensors and software organic to such systems, which means they are behind the other developers.

2) The Brexit problem for Britain deepens as considerations are being made for Britain to extend the time when it’s exits from the European Union. No time for extensions has been agreed upon yet, although the Prime Minister has stated than it cannot be more than a few weeks. This is another example of the British’s concerns for the difficulties that face Britain’s exit.

3) Twenty-first Century Fox studios has been ordered to pay actors of the hit show “Bones”, $179 million dollars in punitive damages, which it withheld from profits promised to the actors.

4) 28 FEB 19 Stock market closings:

Dow                  25,916.00    down    69.16
Nasdaq               7,532.53    down    21.98
S&P 500              2,784.49    down      7.89

10 Year Yield:    up   at    2.71%

Oil:    down   at    $57.18

26 February 2019

1) British farmers and produce workers divided over how Brexit could effect trade. Produce imports comes mostly from European Union and many of the produce workers in Britain are foreign. There are just 32 days left until Brexit automatically happens.

2) Rwanda is being courted by invertors amidst booming economic growth. The government is stable with 7% growth last year and 7.8% growth expected this next year. With the $2 billion dollars invested so far, there are now thousands of new jobs.

3) Fears of sub-prime mortgages could cause another 2007 bubble bust which then caused the 2008 economic crash world wide. Presently, 21% of those sub-prime mortgages are five years without payment because the word got out that mortgage companies were not foreclosing.

4) 25 FEB 19 Stock market closings:

Dow               26,091.95    up    60.14
Nasdaq            7,554.46    up     26.91
S&P 500            2,796.11    up      3.44

10 Year Yield:    up   at    2.67%

Oil:    down   at    $55.42

20 February 2019

1) PMI readings released for America, Japan and the Eurozone indicate a slowing down. This is a result of international tensions, with America having a one in four chance of a slowdown.

2) Honda announced it is pulling out of England, with a loss of 3,500 jobs. Honda claimed their decision wasn’t a result of Brexit, but Britain is considered to be a business friendly country and therefore a portal into the European Union, but with Brexit that will now be going away. Presently, about half the cars in Britain are Japanese models, and Honda’s withdrawal is raising fears that the other Japanese automakers will decide to also withdraw.

3) Fears deepen that the sharp rise of the yen may hurt Japan’s economy. Japan is plagued by low growth, tepid consumer purchases, fast falling of exports and an aging population, all which contribute to Japan’s economic woes.

4) 19 FEB 19     Stock market closings:

Dow                 25,891.32     up      8.07
Nasdaq             7,486.77     up    14.36
S&P 500            2,779.76     up      4.16

10 Year Yield:      down    at     2.65%

Oil:       unchanged   at    $56.09

8 February 2019

1) The EU (European Union) has declared they will not negotiate the Brexit deal with Britain. There are only fifty days remaining before Brexit automatically happens.

2) Optimism fades over China-US trade talks stalling, which caused domestic market to dip down. The administration is considering another tax cut this next year for middle American’s.

3) The growth forecast for the EU is down because of the trade war and global tensions plus the slowdown of China’s economy.

4) 7 FEB 19    Stock market closings:

Dow                  25,169.53    down     220.77
Nasdaq              7,288.35    down       86.93
S&P 500              2,706.05   down       25.56

10 Year Yield:     down   at    2.65%

Oil:    down   at    $52.54

TRADE WAR ON HORIZON, TRUMP vs EVERYONE ELSE????

By: Economic & Finance Report

Could a possible “trade war” be on the horizon, over Pres. Trump’s aluminum & steel tariffs? It could be the case says economic and international business negotiators.

Many economists have indicated that the tariffs imposed could be detrimental to the US economy, while others believe that the impact is minimal, because the tariffs Trump is planning to issue, will only cost American taxpayers a few cents more on the dollar, to support home grown/home based manufacturers, in the steel and aluminum industries.

Gary Cohen, White House director of the National Economic Council is against imposing a tariff on steel and aluminum, while Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and White House National Trade Council Director Peter Navarro, are for imposing the tariffs on steel and aluminum goods & products. –SB