19 March 2021

1) American military officials are warning that, in the next few years, China could invade Taiwan. The island nation has long been a sore subject of U.S.-China relations. China’s rapid military build-up, are recent indications that Taiwan could unilaterally declare its independence from the mainland. An invasion could throw the whole region into chaos and potentially culminate in a shooting war between China and the United States, who is treaty bound to help Taiwan defend itself against Beijing. The Chinese army’s capabilities have matured to such a degree that this is no longer a dilemma we can afford to brush off. The Biden administration must signal its willingness to ‘go to the mat’ for Taiwan and help ensure the island can defend itself, but without further spooking Beijing. China has commissioned 25 advanced new ships, including cruisers, destroyers and ballistic missile submarines, with capabilities designed to keep America and its allies, who might interfere on Taiwan’s behalf, at bay. Meanwhile, China is integrating its new equipment into an increasingly sophisticated force

2) Production at U.S. manufacturers unexpectedly declined in February, representing a pause in recent momentum as factories were beset by severe winter weather and supply-chain challenges. The 3.1% decrease in output was the first since April, following an upwardly revised 1.2% gain in January. Total industrial output reflected a 7.4% surge at utilities, that was the largest advance since March 2017, also driven by increased demand for heating. Manufacturers continue to battle supply shortages and shipping challenges, but lean business inventories, steady demand from consumers and solid capital spending should push manufacturing back up.

3) A Tesla Model Y electric car, with its Autopilot engaged, crashed into a Michigan police car that had pulled over with its lights on. The driver was using Tesla’s Autopilot system when he crashed into the police vehicle, but there were no injuries, according to police. The 22-year-old driver was issued citations for failure to move over and driving with a suspended license. Tesla’s Autopilot system allows the car to brake, accelerate, and steer automatically. The electric car maker also sells its full self-driving software as a $10,000 one-off add-on and plans to release it as a subscription model this summer.

4) Stock market closings for – 18 MAR 21:

Dow 32,862.30 down by 153.07
Nasdaq 13,116.17 down by 409.03
S&P 500 3,915.46 down by 58.66

10 Year Yield: 1.73%

Oil: down at $59.53

26 January 2021

1) Amid rising doubts, both with the Republicans and Democrats, of passing President Biden’s $1.9 trillion dollar coronavirus relief package, some economists call the bill a good step that will help America’s struggling economy and warning that if not passed, then the nation would likely reverted to a recession in early 2021. The $1.9 trillion dollar coronavirus stimulus proposal is designed to jump-start the nation’s sputtering economy as well as accelerate vaccine distribution to control the deadly pandemic. Presently, the plan calls for a one-time $1,400 direct payment to eligible Americans, which would be in addition to the $600 check sent out this month, making a total payment of $2,000. Additionally, there is a supplemental unemployment benefit of $400 a week, up from the present $300 a week.

2) It’s considered that President Biden’s early actions in office will have effects on oil’s outlook, both short and long term. The first actions were revoking approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline and rejoined the Paris climate agreement. Biden administration’s aim is to reduce long-term oil demand as the move away from fossil fuels accelerates. But if all the promises made by the President this first year are kept, oil demand in 2021 is expected to get a 350,000 barrel-per-day boost. The cancelling of the Keystone pipeline is likely to be muted as other world markets take up the production, because Iran and Venezuela have removed about three million barrels per day production from the current market, with other middle east producers are also cutting back on their production.

3) As the demand for fossil fuels is being limited, people are wondering if the electric car’s moment has arrived at last? While rapid advancement in electric cars and batteries is evident, a shortage of electric car chargers is one of the hurdles EVs face to displace the gas-powered vehicles. Presently, transportation accounts for more than a quarter of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Still, the popularity of EVs and hybrid vehicles is already surging. Yet, despite an avalanche of promising news, the shift away from gas-fueled cars remains stubbornly marginal with green vehicles being just 2 percent of the cars sold in the United States. There are electric Hummers, an electric Mustang, and an electric Harley-Davidson motorcycle, with car manufacturers planning to triple the number of non-gas-powered models by 2024 to 203. Ford Motor Co. plans an electric version of its popular F150 pickup. Still roughly 1.5 billion gas-powered cars and trucks are still in operation.

4) Stock market closings for – 25 JAN 21:

Dow 30,960.00 down by 36.98
Nasdaq 13,635.99 up by 92.93
S&P 500 3,855.36 up by 13.89

10 Year Yield: down at 1.04%

Oil: up at $52.88

9 October 2020

1) The airlines around the world are expected to lose $77 billion dollars in the second half of 2020 as Covid-19 continues to crush air travel demand. There are desperate efforts to cut cost by cutting jobs, grounding aircraft and consolidating work, but all their efforts are not enough. The first half of 2020 has been brutal for airline business and the rest of the year isn’t looking much better despite modest increase in air travel. This translates into losing $13 billion dollars a month or $300,000 a minute. At the start, U.S. airlines were burning about $100 million per day, which they reduced to about $30 to $40 million at the end of the third quarter. The airlines hope to reach zero ‘cash burn’ by year’s end using workforce reductions and operational consolidation. Air travel in America is down roughly 70% from 2019.

2) As another hurricane is approaching through the Gulf of Mexico, oil workers are evacuating oil rigs in the gulf ahead of Hurricane Delta, in turn causing oil prices to rise in anticipation of lower available oil. Oil prices had been falling Wednesday, but started rising as the storm came into the Gulf and the off shore evacuations began. So far, 183 offshore oil facilities have been evacuated which has halted nearly 1.5 million barrels per day of oil output. In July, the Gulf of Mexico produced oil at 1.65 million barrels per day, which is 17% of U.S. crude oil output. The demand for oil at refineries is 13.2% lower than a year earlier, a result of the virus crisis.

3) Electric car maker Elon Musk is pushing his company to boost production to build half a million cars in one year. That means producing 170,000 cars in the fourth quarter, a 17% increase from the third quarter. A half a million cars would be a milestone for Musk’s company, a first in the history of Tesla. So far, Tesla has produced 330,000 cars while also posting profits for its fourth consecutive quarter. Additionally, Tesla is pushing production numbers up by adding more production capacity.

4) Stock market closings for – 8 OCT 20:

Dow 28,425.51 up 122.05
Nasdaq 11,420.98 up 56.38
S&P 500 3,446.83 up 27.38

10 Year Yield: down at 0.76%

Oil: up at $41.27

6 January 2020

1) The U.S. manufacturing sector contracted the most in December, more than for a decade. Order volumes crashed to a near eleven year low with factory employment falling for a fifth straight month. The index of national factory activity fell to 47.2 last month from 48.1 for November and is the lowest reading since June 2009. A value of 50 or above indicates expansion, while below is contraction.

2) The electric auto maker Tesla sold more cars in 2019 than the two previous years combined. Tesla sold 367,500 cars in 2019, although its on the low end of the 360,000 to 400,000 cars the company estimated at the beginning of 2019. Its newly opened plant in China will sell its Model 3 automobile in China thus avoiding transport and import cost. China promises to be a major increase in Tesla sales for next year.

3) Despite worries by experts expecting a decline of spending by American consumers, many consider the consumer will keep the economy humming through the next year. This Christmas shopping season appears it will set new records in spending, despite trade tensions, Washington being absorbed in impeachment and oil prices creeping up. With the economy always on the minds of voters, a good economy bodes well for incumbents with 2020 being a presidential election year.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 JAN 20:

Dow              28,634.88    down    233.92
Nasdaq            9,020.77    down       71.42
S&P 500         3,234.85    down      23.00

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.79%

Oil:    up   at    $63.04

12 August 2019

1) The electric car company Tesla Inc is being sued claiming the company limited battery range of its older vehicles using software updates. The alleged intent was for Tesla to avoid costly fixes to defective batteries. The lawsuit is seeking class action status for thousands of Model S and X owners. The suit claims that older generation batteries had their range curtailed by an automatic software update. As a result of a battery fire, Tesla claims they are revising charge and thermal management settings via the software to further protect the battery and improve battery longevity.

2) The Chinese-American trade war hasn’t been bad for all nations, other nations are experiencing increase trade as a result of the war. Australia is the biggest beneficiary with exports to China of natural resources. Second is Switzerland, the third is Mexico which has replaced China as U.S. largest exporter. Fourth is Brazil who is benefitting from agricultural export to China and the fifth is Canada.

3) Malaysia is expanding its efforts to prosecute seventeen Goldman Sachs executives, who were allegedly involved in misleading investors in a $6.5 billion dollar bond sale. The bonds were for the state investment fund, 1 Malaysia Development Bhd or 1MDB. Charges include executives knowing that funds would be siphon off so Malaysia is also seeking to recoup funds and fees.

4) Stock market closings for – 9 AUG 19:

Dow             26,287.44    down    90.75
Nasdaq          7,959.14    down    80.02
S&P 500         2,918.65    down    19.44

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.73%

Oil:    down   at    $54.27

4 June 2019

1) The electric car manufacturer Tesla has been getting significant revenues by selling credits to other car makers who need to offset sales of polluting vehicles. General Motors and Fiat-Chrysler disclosed that they have reached agreements to buy federal greenhouse gas credits from Tesla. These companies want to bank their green credits for use later when emission rules get tougher, especially if democrats regain the White House.

2) Bond yields are dropping at the fastest rate since th 2008 global financial crisis, in anticipation that the Federal reserve will cut interest rates to counter the fallout from the trade tensions. The two year Treasury yield has fallen for five straight days. This is likely to have damaging effects on business confidence as businesses become more concerned with future growth.

3) The U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index fell by more than 2 points in May, the lowest level since September 2009, 6 points over the last year. This index reflects a drop in new orders or postponement of orders due to the uncertainty of the economic future. Manufactures are having to hold selling prices lower because of diminished sales, which in turn is squeezing profits.

4) 3 JUN 19 Stock market closings:

Dow             24,819.78   up            4.74
Nasdaq          7,333.02   down   120.13
S&P 500         2,744.45   down        7.61

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.08%

Oil:    down   at    $52.85

29 May 2019

1) Reports continue of a General Motors and Ford merger in the near future, both are in deep financial trouble. The proposed merger would make the new company the third largest in the world, behind Toyota and Volkswagen. Car sales have flattened in the U.S. and are dropping in China, which are the two largest car markets in the world. There are also questions of how successful Ford can enter the electric and hybrid car markets.

2) Amazon, the worlds largest retailer, is starting to purge many of its small vendors, and concentrate on large major brands like Lego, Procter & Gamble and Sony to better compete with the large traditional retailers such as Target and Walmart. This will be one of the biggest shifts in Amazon’s strategy since it started using independent sellers, and is scaring the daylights out of many smaller companies.

3) The prices for homes is rising at its slowest pace in six years, down 2.7% from last year’s 3%. Price gains in hot cities like San Francisco have cooled, which is causing sellers to pull in their price increases. The home and auto segments of the economy constitute one half of the U.S. economy.

4) 28 MAY 19 Stock market closings:

Dow              25,347.77    down    237.92
Nasdaq           7,607.35    down      29.66
S&P 500          2,802.39     down     23.67

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.27%

Oil:    down   at    $59.06

23 January 2019

1) The electric car manufacturer Tesla announced a 7% cut of their full-time staff. The company faces very difficult times ahead in selling affordable renewable energy products, in part because the ending of some tax credits.

2) China economic growth slows down to 6.6%, the lowest in 25 years, with a forecast of 6.3% for this year. China constitutes one third of the global growth.

3) The International Monetary Fund cuts world economic growth forecast because of the risk stemming from Brexit as well as China’s slowing growth.

4) 22 JAN 19 Stock market closings:

Dow                      24,404.48             down     301.87
Nasdaq                   7,020.36             down     136.87
S&P 500                  2,632.90             down       37.81

10 Year Yield:      down   at    2.73%

Oil:     up    at    $53.02