23 November 20

1) When Joe Biden takes the presidential oath of office next year, he will need to address the question of his son and brother’s business arrangements with entities of foreign governments. A five-page report, with 65 pages of evidence, confirms the connections between the Biden family and the communist Chinese government, as well as the links between Hunter Biden’s business associates and the Russian government. Bidens’ global web of “consulting” and influence-mongering has created some unsavory question about conflicts of interest. Even if every past, present, or future business arrangement by Hunter and Jim Biden is technically legal, which is still an open question, plenty of difficulties can arise from financial pressure to do the bidding of those adversaries. To maintain public trust in his new administration’s diplomacy, the new president must force his son and brother to divest from many aspects of Biden family business.

2) Earlier this year, Australia was among the first countries to call for an official investigation into the coronavirus origins. China responded angrily which accusations that Australia’s highly irresponsible acts could disrupt international cooperation in fighting the pandemic. In recent months, China has imposed trade tariffs on Australia, targeted Australian journalists, and issued angry missives regarding Australia’s dealings with other regional powers. Chinese diplomats have distributed a document to Australian media listing Beijing’s grievances with Australia. These include unfairly blocking Chinese investment, spreading disinformation about China’s coronavirus response, falsely accusing Beijing of hacking, and engaging in incessant wanton interference in Xinjiang, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Yet while there may be legitimate concerns about China in a number of countries, such as the role of telecoms manufacturer Huawei in 5G networks, Australia has become more hawkish than most, but Australia could look foolish if Biden opens up partnerships with China on climate and pandemic management leaving Australia standing alone.

3) As Congress breaks for Thanksgiving, 12 million Americans may lose their jobless benefits on December 26 unless Congress can agree on a new stimulus deal in the next few weeks. More than half of the 21 million people currently collecting unemployment benefits can be effected. If lawmakers head home for Thanksgiving soon, it is even less likely they will reach a deal before they break for the year in December. As they do, millions of Americans could potentially lose their own residences when the nationwide eviction moratorium also expires at the end of the year. Tens of millions more cannot afford enough food to eat. Additionally, long-term unemployment is on the rise with the share of jobless workers out of work for 27 weeks or more, shot up from 19.1% to 32.5% in October, because there are simply not enough jobs being created to support all of the workers running out of aid before the end of 2020.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 NOV 20:

Dow 29,263.48 down by 219.75
Nasdaq 11,854.97 down by 49.74
S&P 500 3,557.54 down by 24.33

10 Year Yield: down at 0.83%

Oil: up at $42.47

20 November 2020

1) The pharmaceutical company Moderna Inc. has announced its experimental coronavirus vaccine is 94.5% effective against Covid-19, the second vaccine to hit a key milestone in U.S. testing. The 30,000-subject trial, which is still underway, indicates it is effective at preventing disease that causes symptoms, while also showing signs of being safe. Moderna said it plans to ask federal health authorities to clear the vaccine by early December, and if approved, could go into distribution that month, making it one of the first Covid-19 vaccines to go into distribution in the U.S., where reported coronavirus cases and hospitalizations are surging. Earlier this month two other companies, Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE, said their experimental Covid-19 vaccine is more than 90% effective at protecting people from the virus in a large clinical trial.

2) American retail sales rose at a slower-than-expected pace last month, as spending slowed amid steady increases in weekly applications for unemployment benefits as the pandemic continues to accelerate. Retail sales for the month of October rose 0.3% to $553.3 billion, less than the forecasted 0.5% advance. Amazon, the online retail giant, is considered to be nearing its peak retail expansion in selling and delivering hard goods. Their problem is there’s really not much left to sell except maybe automobiles.

3) The spiraling COVID-19 crisis will confront president elect Joe Biden starting on day-one. But so far, there’s no indication he has any real plan and how he will get it done. He has vowed to enact a swift and aggressive national approach to combating COVID-19 with a federal mask mandate and impose similar restrictions at a local level. He wants to expanding testing and contact tracing efforts and use a more evidence-based approach in issuing guidance. But his success will partly hinge on the daunting task of controlling a spiraling pandemic that has constrained the country for nearly a year, and then repairing the economic damage it has wrought.

4) Stock market closings for – 19 NOV 20:

Dow 29,483.23 up by 44.81
Nasdaq 11,904.71 up by 103.11
S&P 500 3,581.87 up by 14.08

10 Year Yield: down at 0.85%

Oil: down at $41.58

19 November 2020

1) A crew of three astronauts went into space aboard a Crew Dragon spacecraft atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 booster. Not since the end of the Space Shuttle program in 2011 has America launched humans into orbit from American, to docked with the International Space Station. The Crew Dragon carried an international assembly of astronauts, three Americans and one Japanese, who are expected to spend the next six months in the station. The launch is another milestone in the commercialization of space. Previously, NASA was purchasing flights on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft but with SpaceX, NASA will save about $25 million per seat.

2) There are growing fears that tourism may not fully recover in New York city until 2025, another result of the coronavirus pandemic. New York city may only get one-third as many visitors as it did last year, a city that is one of the world’s most popular destinations. Forecasters predict that tourism will not fully rebound for at least four years, where in recent years tourism has been a vital part of the city’s economy, that supports hundreds of thousands of workers from hotels to restaurants to Broadway. New York had a record 66.6 million visitors in 2019 and drew $46 billion dollars in annual spending. The collapse of tourism has been a key reason that New York’s economy has been hit harder than most other major American cities. The city’s unemployment rate is 14.1 percent, more than double the national rate.

3) Experts predict that Boeing’s 737 MAX debacle could be the most expensive corporate blunder ever. The 20-month grounding of the 737 MAX could end very soon, but Boeing’s mounting costs have soared to tens of billions of dollars, which may rank among the most expensive corporate mistakes in history. Financially, Boeing continues to pay a high cost to ensure the safety of future 737 MAX passengers, with about $20 billion dollars in direct costs from the grounding, then $8.6 billion dollars in compensation to customers, $5 billion for costs of production, and $6.3 billion for increased costs of the 737 MAX program. Also, Boeing is spending $600 million for jet storage, pilot training and software updates that are not included in the company’s overall cost estimate. Finally, the company has established a $100 million dollar victim compensation fund, which also is not included in Boeing’s $20 billion dollars in estimated costs. Not included is the cost of legal liability which may add another $500 million. Boeing has had to borrow billions of dollars at a roughly 5% interest rate adding more money to be paid out over the 737 MAX. There is also the cost of opportunity lost from the lost of sales with 448 canceled orders for the MAX this year, compared with only nine for its other models. In addition Boeing has dropped another 782 orders from its backlog of orders believed to be no longer certain enough to rely on. In at least some cases those uncertain plane orders are jets airline customers have said they no longer want.

4) Stock market closings for – 18 NOV 20:

Dow 29,438.42 down by 344.93
Nasdaq 11,801.60 down by 97.74
S&P 500 3,567.79 down by 41.74

10 Year Yield: up at 0.88%

Oil: up at $41.62

18 November 2020

1) Crude oil prices and energy stocks aren’t the only things that have fallen during this oil downturn, land prices with potential oil shale have also plummeted. The average price of U.S. oil shale acreage has fallen by more than 70 percent in two years, falling from $17,000 per acre in 2018 to $5,000 per acre in 2020. The value of oil and gas assets has plunged because of the coronavirus pandemic sending crude oil demand down globally, consequently most energy companies are slashing their costs instead of purchasing new land for oil and gas drilling. Oil and gas companies are forced to sell assets to make up money lost on deals.

2) On January the first of next year, President Trump’s pause on student loan payments for 33 million Americans is set to expire, just three weeks before President-elect Joe Biden is slated to take over. The Education Department is warning borrowers this week that their monthly payments will resume. For the incoming president, the economic and administrative mess could take months to untangle, consuming the early days of his Education Department. The student loan system was not designed to start and stop at any time for 30 million borrowers. This became apparent in March when loan payments were suspending and problems for borrowers quickly arose. This is just one facet of the economic problems facing the new president in just a few months, that not only must be addressed, but addressed correcting if problems are not to get worst.

3) The United States has surpassed 11 million coronavirus cases , that’s 1 million new infections in just one week, or 2 million since the beginning of the month. Consequently, hospitals are reaching a breaking point trying to treat nearly 70,000 Covid-19 patients. Medical workers are tired . . . mentally, physically and emotionally exhausted. The stress is being felt around the nation, with the virus spreading like wildfire and the medical system having no backup. If you act early, you can save lives, but if you don’t, you’ll be swamped by a tsunami of this virus. But a Covid-19 vaccine may be in the making with Moderna announcing it has developed a vaccine that’s nearly 95% effective, capable of preventing severe illness, and it could start giving vaccinations to high-risk patients and health care workers as soon as December. A week before, drugmaker, Pfizer announced that its human trials suggest its coronavirus vaccine is more than 90% effective.

4) Stock market closings for – 17 NOV 20:

Dow 29,783.35 down 167.09
Nasdaq 11,899.34 down 24.79
S&P 500 3,609.53 down 17.38

10 Year Yield: down at 0.87%

Oil: down at $41.40

17 November 2020

1) Because of the worldwide pandemic, Asia has been vastly overstocked with oil distillates this year. In response, China’s biggest refiner is eyeing a creative strategy to ease the persistent diesel glut by using brand new supertankers usually reserved for crude oil. While supertankers are built to transport dirty fuels such as crude oil, they can carry cleaner products like gasoline and diesel on their maiden voyage. Therefore, China’s largest oil refiner has hired a newly-built very large crude carrier to load low-sulfur diesel in Asia for delivery to Europe. China intends to charter brand new vessels on a regular basis to transport more diesel to Europe, thereby clearing out bloated fuel stockpiles in Asia. Oil prices settle lower after a surprise climb in U.S. crude supplies.

2) An adults-only luxury resort in the Maldives is offering guests (two people max) a year’s worth of unlimited stays in 2021 for $30,000. Called the “Unlimited Stays in Paradise” package, which includes an over water bungalow, free breakfast services, discounts on dining experiences at the resort and spa services. The 5-star adult-only resort has multiple restaurants and private dining experiences, an option for private movie screenings, a spa, and offers fun excursions. Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, many destinations, Bermuda and Barbados for instance, are taking advantage of people wanting to opt-out of quarantining in their homes for an isolated vacation overseas. Three Hawaiian islands, Maui, Kauai, and the Big Island, considered allowing tourists to vacation in a Resort Bubble, which will allow visitors to safely roam.

3) China’s Ruler Xi Jinping has halted Ant’s record-breaking $37 billion IPO after the company’s boss Jack Ma snubbed government leaders. Jack Ma, Ant’s founder, criticized Chinese government leaders, when a week before the Chinese fintech was set to go public, Ma made incendiary comments that didn’t go down well with the president or other government officials. This is another example of how President Xi deals with any threat to his authority, such as Hong Kong, including a low tolerance for big private businesses that accumulate wealth and power. Ma also criticized the regulators who enforce a set of international banking rules as an old people’s club. The fintech had already secured over $3 trillion in orders from individual investors across its dual listings in Hong Kong and Shanghai.

4) Stock market closings for – 16 NOV 20:
Dow 29,950.44 up by 470.63
Nasdaq 11,924.13 up by 94.84
S&P 500 3,626.91 up by 41.76
10 Year Yield: up at 0.91%
Oil: up at $41.47

16 November 2020

1) Experts predict the growth of jobs will slow during a Biden presidency, simply because the easy gains are almost gone. So the easy part of job recovery will be history by the time President-elect Joe Biden moves into the White House, leaving a particularly difficult environment for an administration seeking to right the economy. The job growth rate has decline every month since June, and this will be even worst with the resurgence of the coronavirus putting economic growth into reverse. One cause of this is companies who laid off workers at the start of the pandemic, have since gone out of business, leaving nothing for laid-off workers to return to. Over a million workers are still being laid off or fired each month, with about 3.7 million additional workers who have quit working or looking for work entirely since February. Furthermore, it takes longer for skilled workers to return to work simply because there are few jobs available to choose from.

2) Massachusetts was one of the hardest hit states by the virus last spring, and this summer was seen as a model for infection control, but now, the number of Covid-19 cases are climbing once again with confirmed deaths surpassing 10,000. So Massachusetts is having to return to restrictions approaching another shutdown. And Massachusetts isn’t the only state seeing a strong resurgence in the coronavirus. California becomes the second state to top one million cases, with Texas closely following, who hit the grim milestone earlier this week. Just five states account for about one third of new cases. Nationwide, the pandemic has killed more than 240,000 forcing states to impose measures as cases surge. Many officials attribute raising number of cases to complacency in travel and social settings such as bars and house parties.

3) Canada welcomes Hong Kong refugees amid China crackdown by easing immigration requirements for them. Canada plans to target young, educated Hong Kongers. Their plan includes the creation of a new three-year open work permit for recent graduates and shortening eligibility for permanent residency to one year. This comes at a low point in Canada-China relations, after the 2018 arrest of a top Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. executive. Hong Kongers already in Canada will now be eligible to apply for permanent residency sooner, provided they meet language and education requirements and have worked for a year in Canada.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 NOV 20:

Dow 29,479.81 up by 399.64
Nasdaq 11,829.29 up by 119.70
S&P 500 3,585.15 up by 48.14

10 Year Yield: up at 0.89%

Oil: down at $40.12

10 November 2020

1) The United States became the first nation to surpass 10 million coronavirus infections since the worldwide pandemic started. This is the feared third wave of the Covid-19 virus now surging across the nation. America has reported about a million cases in the past 10 days, the highest rate of infections since the first reporting, while worldwide, coronavirus cases now exceeds 50 million. In the United States the daily average of new deaths account for 1 in every 11 deaths worldwide. The Midwest remains the hardest-hit region based on the most cases per capital with the top five worst-affected states being North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Nebraska.

2) With Joe Biden now expected to enter the Oval Office, the American workplace is going to look much different. Biden has four decades of union leaders behind him, making him potentially the most labor-friendly president of the U.S., who won the endorsement of almost every major union in the country. Labor reform is a fundamental part of his administration with at least one union leader to be named to his Cabinet. As the coronavirus pandemic continues to drive permanent job losses and compromise worker safety, the case for structural change may be stronger than ever. A sharp turn from the Trump White House on labor policy is expected with the Democrats to reverse the present labor policies. Worker safety enforcement, progressive labor policy with a federal minimum wage of $15 per hour, boost manufacturing via trade, and a more labor-friendly National Labor Relations Board are just some of the areas for major changes to be made. Bill Clinton and Barack Obama push through a wide range of policies, only to have their plans overtaken by other agenda items like health care. But the most important factor being overlooked is AI (Artificial Intelligence) experts are predicting that up to 50% of American jobs will disappear in the next 15 to 25 years. Also, any time you raise the cost of labor, then those jobs will be replaced by automation.

3) Japan moves to reduce its fossil fuel emissions, with Japan being the fifth largest polluter, by using hydrogen fuel for its energy needs. Hydrogen offers the greatest potential to decarbonize industries like steel, cement and heavy duty transport, to achieve net-zero emissions.

4) Stock market closings for – 9 NOV 20: The Dow surged to 1,500 points on news of an effective Covid-19 vaccine trials by Pfizer with early results showing at 90% effectiveness. The Dow was briefly over 30,000.

Dow 29,157.97 up by 834.57
Nasdaq 11,713.78 down by 181.45
S&P 500 3,550.50 up at 41.06

10 Year Yield: up at 0.96%

Oil: up at $39.84

5 November 2020

1) Even with the election stagnated, waiting on the counting of votes to find the winner, the markets were already climbing despite the final results could be days away. The Dow Jones industrial average whipsawed overnight, despite the uncertainty which usually depresses the markets. Nevertheless, the Dow climbed to a peak of over 700 points, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 index and Nasdaq also surging upward. The state of the Senate is also in doubt with neither side having a solid majority, another source of uncertainty. Voter turnout is expected to be the highest in more than a century. Experts expect volatile markets for the coming days, and maybe weeks until the election results are finalized. While bonds have dropped in their yield as expected, oil continues to gain in price. Even the foreign markets are showing an upward trend.

2) China’s new therapy for Alzheimer’s begins a much-anticipated U.S. study, the latest effort in the multibillion-dollar search for an effective treatment for the incurable disease. The drug made by Shanghai Green Valley Pharmaceutical Co. plans a $600 million dollar global Phase III trial. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave its approval in April to study whether the drug can produce lasting cognitive improvement among patients in the mild and moderate stage of the debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. The trial will have 2,046 people across China, the U.S. and Europe, the first 600 expected to start in the next six months. The first patients will begin taking the drug in four weeks.

3) Nearly 140 million votes have been cast in the 2020 elections, the most ever in a US presidential election, exceeding 2016’s record of 137.1 million. About 100 million people have voted ahead of Election Day, or about 73.4% of the total votes cast nationwide in 2016. The increased number of early votes is a result of heightened public-health concerns of coronavirus pandemic with in-person voting on Election Day. Several states have taken measures to expand early voting and access to mail-in ballots.

4) Stock market closings for – 4 NOV 20:

Dow 27,847.66 up by 367.63
Nasdaq 11,590.78 up by 430.21
S&P 500 3,443.44 up by 74.28

10 Year Yield: down at 0.77%

Oil: up at $39.11

2 November 2020

1) America’s economy is expanding at a record pace after a historic decline from the Covid-19 crisis. The economy grew at an unprecedented 7.4% pace from the second to the third quarter, which on an annualized basis, would be a growth rate of 33.1%. This would be the highest annualized growth rate on record. While this is undoubtedly positive, it comes with lots of caveats, for the U.S. economy is still in a deep hole with the gross domestic product still about 3.5% below the level recorded in the fourth quarter of 2019. Second, the economy is slowing. Third, there are about 11 million fewer people on payrolls than before the pandemic hit, plus layoffs persist. Finally, the report is a political football with politicians framing the numbers to best serve their individual’s objectives.

2) Cruise ships can begin a phased return to operations starting Nov. 1 under new health protocols. There has been 74 recommendations made for a potential safe return to cruising, including a new focus on “air management”, lower ship capacities, shorter sailing times, required testing and masks, and enhanced cleaning and medical staff on voyages. There are four phases to return to cruising, beginning with cruise ships establishing coronavirus testing of all crew. Phase 2 will be simulated voyages to test the ability to mitigate Covid-19 on cruise ships. Phase 3 is certification by the CDC, and the final phase is a return to passenger voyages.

3) One question this fall is America’s energy future of whether, and to what extent, we should transition from reliable fossil fuels, such as oil and natural gas, to more intermittent sources of energy such as wind and solar power. But arbitrarily halting oil and natural gas development would do serious harm to our economy, and thereby jeopardize post-pandemic recovery. Businesses need reliable, low-cost energy to reopen and return to normal operations, and presently fossil fuels currently accounts for 80 percent of overall American energy production. At the start of this year, the oil and gas industry was responsible for 12.3 million American jobs, while also generating $1.6 trillion dollars in federal and state tax revenue. So if the oil and gas revenue dries up, major public services will be reduced or even cut. The simple fact is that the United States cannot continue on the path of recovery without a thriving oil and natural gas industry because it supports jobs, lowers energy costs for families and businesses, and strengthens our energy and national security.

4) Stock market closings for – 30 OCT 20:

Dow 26,659.11 up 139.16
Nasdaq 11,185.59 up 180.73
S&P 500 3,310.11 up 39.08

10 Year Yield: up at 0.84%

Oil: unchanged at $36.10

29 October 2020

1) One major factor in the spread of Covid-19 virus, is the portability of societies, the degree which people are moving about and interacting with each other with ease. This is a major cause of the spread of infectious disease. Now with the surge of coronavirus in Europe, Germany and France, they are planning to restrict movement of people for at least a month, coming close to the stringent lockdowns of the spring as European leaders seek to rein in a resurgent pandemic outbreak. Spain, Italy, the U.K., Greece and Portugal reported record numbers of new cases on Wednesday. Asia, Singapore and Hong Kong could start a planned ‘travel bubble’ as soon as next month. This also means restrictions of travel for migrant workers, which in turn means restricting their ability to make money, where much is sent back home to families to support their subsistence.

2) Boeing Aircraft company, a major manufacture of airliners, will cut 7,000 more jobs amid the pandemic, almost doubling its planned job cuts. The coronavirus pandemic has prolonged the grounding of Boeing’s 737 Max jet, thus dimming prospects for financial recovery. Executives are abandoning their forecast that Boeing will stop burning cash next year and so they are now forced to eliminate an additional 7,000 jobs. That will bring the expected losses from layoffs, retirements and attrition to 30,000 people, or 19% of the pre-pandemic workforce, by the end of 2021.

3) Taiwan’s microcircuit manufacture United Microelectronics Corp. has pledged its assistance to the U.S. in a high-profile trade-secrets prosecution of Chinese chipmaker Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Co. UMC has pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court as part of a deal with U.S. prosecutors. Prosecutors agreed to drop serious charges of economic espionage and conspiracy for theft of proprietary information from Idaho-based Micron Technology Inc. UMC instead admitted to trade-secret theft and agreed to pay a $60 million dollar fine. Prosecutors haven’t publicly detailed the cooperation they are seeking from UMC against Fujian

4) Stock market closings for – 28 OCT 20:
Dow 26,519.95 down 943.24
Nasdaq 11,004.87 down 426.48
S&P 500 3,271.03 down 119.65

10 Year Yield: unchanged at 0.78%

Oil: down at $37.69