7 January 2021

1) Chinese stocks listed in the U.S., including China Telecom Corp. and Pinduoduo Inc., fell on the prospect of further American sanctions. This decline was led by a group of Chinese telecommunications stocks after the New York Stock Exchange said it will delist three companies to comply with a U.S. executive order. While the companies are mostly traded in Asia, their stocks are also traded domestically. But an order from President Trump barred American investments in China-based firms that are affiliated with the military. However, there is now talk of the order being modified or even rescinded.

2) Reportedly, Chinese cities are going dark as the country faces shortages of coal, which is a major Australian export, as authorities limit power usage, citing the shortage of coal. Analysts said prices of the commodity in the country have shot up due to the reported crunch with some tying the shortages and blackouts to the unofficial ban on Australian coal. In turn, prices of the commodity have shot up due to the reported crunch. The reports also follow rising trade tensions between Beijing and Canberra, leading some analysts to tie the coal shortages and blackouts to the unofficial ban on Australian coal. Relations between the two nations have soured since last year because Australia supported an international inquiry into China’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Coal is just one in a growing list of Australian goods that China is targeting. China is the world’s largest coal consumer and its greatest source of coal imports was Australia.

3) Shale oil needs more than $50 a barrel to be profitable, something that is now a possibility because of Saudi Arabia’s pledge for a big supply cut in their oil production. But Joe Biden wants to ban new fracking in New Mexico, an area that has emerged as the ‘go-to’ spot for drillers desperate to squeeze as much crude from the ground without bleeding cash. The price was above $50 before the pandemic sent oil markets crashing, forcing over 40 explorers into bankrupt. It will take at least three months for shale producers to ramp up production, because that would involve decisions on new drilling and getting well-completion crews together, which puts their operations well into the new Biden administration.

4) Stock market closings for – 6 JAN 21:
Dow 30,829.40 up by 437.80
Nasdaq 12,740.79 down by 78.17
S&P 500 3,748.14 up by 21.28
10 Year Yield: up at 1.04%
Oil: up at $50.48

STOCKS ARE GREEN TODAY & FOR THE YEAR!!!!!!!! HURRAYYYYYYYY

stock market pic

By: Economic & Finance Report

Wall Street gained today heavily because of rallying support of crude oil prices and energy stocks that attributed to enormous rise. The Dow erased loses that occurred from the first two months of the year. 

Traders were delighted when oil prices closed over $40/barrel which signal a good sign for commodities.  Energy sector had great highlights today as it closed up on several fronts. The Federal Reserve left rates unchanged and this brought about a bullish signal to investors.

In all today was a productive day for the markets and it was glaringly noticed by all markets.-SB

 

LATIN AMERICA ECONOMIC GROWTH IN Q3 PICKS UP….OUTLOOK STILL BLEEK

 

latin america economy

By: Economic & Finance Report

In the 3rd Quarter Latin America’s economic growth picked up some steam. The GDP indicated that  Latin America expanded 0.6% in the Q3. Economies such Bolivia,  Mexico, and Peru outperformed, while countries such as Venezuela, Argentina and Brazil were intensely lagging.

The decline of oil prices hurt Argentina and Venezuela because of their dependency of the rich commodity. The fall of oil prices has a drastic impact in the region because the commodity is heavily relied on as revenue for  importing and exporting.

In 2015 the currency in the Latin America has taken a slide as well, which many countries saw the  currency rates slide against the dollar. As the oil prices fell, so did currency for countries in the region as well. 

Latin America’s economic outlook though seems to be bleek though as noted by economists reducing the region’s long term growth rate to only 0.4%. The energy sector has also been affected tremendously because of the devaluation of the oil markets.

-SB

Latin America’s Economy May Be Affected By China’s Slowdown

latin america gdp

By Economic & Finance Report

It has been perceived that China’s economic  slow growth recently may be affecting the Latin America’s economy, because of the lack of China’s purchasing raw materials in Latin America.  Raw materials such as soybeans (Argentina), copper (Chile), coffee (Brazil) have seen recent drastic declines, especially since China’s has reduced its  ability to purchase these lucrative commodities.

Countries such as Venezuela have been hit hard by the recent slowdown especially with the declining of oil and other precious resources. The IMF has predicted a country such as Venezuela will be contracting for the next two years, this year and next year.

It is stated that Latin America has focused to heavily on raw material output and not enough on  diversifying other sectors in regional production. Many analysts speculated that China’s cheap labor eventually would outcompete  Latin America’s labor force, which it did and the manufacturing sector in Latin America’s economy has suffered horribly for it.

A growing and stable China helped cultivate  and economize many Latin American countries, and it is without this growth that stagnated the continent as well.Though it is implied by economists that Latin America may now need to focus more on regional development export and imports in the regional instead on dependency that has been plagued for decades by China, since the 1970s.

China has rebutted that the economic slowdown will be a long term effect to Latin America. They insist that the commodities that are exported to China serve as a mutual benefit for both Latin America and China, even more so then exports to the United States. As time passes and trade is one of the main focal points between China and Latin America, it remains to be seen how this economic barrier or stagnation  develops itself, if or when it does…

-SB