6 April 2020

1) Across the world, truckers are having a difficult time in their role of delivering food stocks to the people. In America, truck drivers are finding it more difficult to operate, unable to find places to eat, with restaurants shut down and their rigs too big to go to the drive-thru lanes. They are unable to find places to sleep, shower or even clean toilet facilities. Nevertheless, the food supply chain continues to struggle to get the necessary food to the people.

2) With the government announcement that we are now in a recession, questions abound how long will it last? For the ‘08 recession, it took more than a decade to recover. One major obstacle facing a recovery, from a near total shutdown of the economy, is the small businesses. Half the businesses in the American economy are classed as small businesses, and half of those have less than fifteen days cash reserves, which means a significant number of American businesses will not survive the virus shutdown. This will leave millions of workers scrambling to find work and therefore will greatly hinder a recovery.

3) Oil prices have rallied from news that the Saudi Arabia – Russia price war may be coming to an end with agreements to cut back oil production by ten million barrels a day. Oil is the keystone to economic vitality with oil prices needing to be above about $40 a barrel for shale oil to be profitable so America can remain oil independent.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 APR 20:

Dow 21,052.53 down 360.91
Nasdaq 7,373.08 down 114.23
S&P 500 2,488.65 down 38.25

10 Year Yield: down at 0.59%

Oil: up at $29.00

26 March 2020

1) The coronavirus crisis has also crippled the sales of automobiles with March sales down by an expected 35.5% and 15.3% decline expected for 2020. The decline poses the largest threat to the auto industry since the Great Recession which resulted in the bankruptcy of General Motors and Chrysler. Globally, auto sales are expected to drop by 12%, which is greater than the 8% of the Great Recession. Most dealers are keeping their doors open, although some are only allowed to keep their service centers open during the shutdown order.

2) The coronavirus crisis has brought negative rates to the U.S., the first time for negative yields on government debt. The yields on both one-month and three-month Treasury bills have dipped below zero on Wednesday. Negative yields have been a part of European markets for months now, with many expecting the same to come to America.

3) Many entertainment facilities and events have been canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic with the closing of Disneyland and Disney World being the first world renowned closures. A long list of political events, theme parks, sporting events and leagues, cultural and concerns closures has been joined by the announcement that the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo has been postpone for a year. The economic losses, both direct and indirect, are near incalculable to make. This will add to the total economic downturn of the world with innumerable support and supply businesses suffering.

4) Stock market closings for – 25 MAR 20:

Dow 21,200.55 up 495.64
Nasdaq 7,384.30 down 33.56
S&P 500 2,475.56 up 28.23

10 Year Yield: up at 0.86%

Oil: up at $24.31

24 March 2020

1) The International Monetary Fund stated the global recession caused by the coronavirus pandemic could be worse than the global financial crisis of 2008-9. However, the world economic output should recover in 2021 because of the extraordinary fiscal actions already being taken by many countries and their central banks. But for a 2021 recovery, countries need to prioritize containment and strengthen health systems.

2) The U.S. is entering a recession, but the ultimate fear is a protracted malaise akin to a depression. Some prominent economy watchers are drawing comparisons to the Great Depression, although falling short of forecasting another one, based on the fact that the world has not seen a synchronized interruption in economic output in decades as was seen with the Great Depression. The U.S. will suffer a huge economic contraction as businesses close and Americans stay home, with some estimates that the economy will have the worst quarter since 1947.

3) Most U.S. small businesses have only days to stay afloat amid the coronavirus crisis. Only about half of the 30 million small businesses in America have a 15 day cash reserve needed to survive. The shelter in place orders have cut business revenues to near zero almost over night. Particularly hard hit is the service industries such as restaurants, landscaping, personal services and salons. These small businesses employ about 60 million people, or half of American’s work force. Many of the businesses were already operating on razor thin margins before the virus crisis. With so little cash reserves, they are forced to immediately reduce hours or layoff employees to survive.

4) Stock market closings for – 23 MAR 20:

Dow 18,591.93 down 582.05
Nasdaq 6,860.67 down 18.84
S&P 500 2,237.40 down 67.52

10 Year Yield: down at 0.76%

Oil: up at $24.24

SEARS SEEMS TO BE GOING THRU BANKRUPTCY………

By: Economic & Finance Report

Sears looks as if it will be staring down the eyes of bankruptcy. They have hired M-III Partners to assist in the bankruptcy filings; that is expected to be filed later this week. The end of the second week of October.

Sears has been losing money with their brick and mortar businesses in recent years, especially as e-commerce businesses such as Amazon have been profiting from online sales for a long time.

As E-commerce ramps up sales as the holiday season approaches, Sears has needed to reevaluate their business models, while at the same time waving the white flag. -SB

TEXAS REFINERIES RESTART AFTER COLOSSAL HURRICANE HARVEY!!!!!!!!!

By: Economic & Finance Report

Texas oil refineries began production of oil again Saturday Sept 3, 2017.  This is after a rocky and unstable week presented to the Texas and Louisiana region from the turbulent hurricane called Harvey. Hurricane Harvey being categorized as a Category 4 hurricane, ruined and destroyed billions and billions of dollars of infrastructure and property (residential and commercial); and distablized the southern gulf region.

The federal government has indicated that close to $200 billion will be needed to infuse in the economies; of Texas and Louisiana especially to jump start business initiatives and future business development projects in the region.

Alot of the Texas refineries had to drastically cut production because of the damage Harvey propelled. More then half of the oil refineries in the US is in the Gulf, so when Harvey hit the region, it really made a impact to oil production.

As the refineries begin to resume their productivity, many people and businesses will have to find ways to pick up and resume their lives, from the turmoil this horrible hurricane has inflicted on them. -SB