23 November 20

1) When Joe Biden takes the presidential oath of office next year, he will need to address the question of his son and brother’s business arrangements with entities of foreign governments. A five-page report, with 65 pages of evidence, confirms the connections between the Biden family and the communist Chinese government, as well as the links between Hunter Biden’s business associates and the Russian government. Bidens’ global web of “consulting” and influence-mongering has created some unsavory question about conflicts of interest. Even if every past, present, or future business arrangement by Hunter and Jim Biden is technically legal, which is still an open question, plenty of difficulties can arise from financial pressure to do the bidding of those adversaries. To maintain public trust in his new administration’s diplomacy, the new president must force his son and brother to divest from many aspects of Biden family business.

2) Earlier this year, Australia was among the first countries to call for an official investigation into the coronavirus origins. China responded angrily which accusations that Australia’s highly irresponsible acts could disrupt international cooperation in fighting the pandemic. In recent months, China has imposed trade tariffs on Australia, targeted Australian journalists, and issued angry missives regarding Australia’s dealings with other regional powers. Chinese diplomats have distributed a document to Australian media listing Beijing’s grievances with Australia. These include unfairly blocking Chinese investment, spreading disinformation about China’s coronavirus response, falsely accusing Beijing of hacking, and engaging in incessant wanton interference in Xinjiang, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Yet while there may be legitimate concerns about China in a number of countries, such as the role of telecoms manufacturer Huawei in 5G networks, Australia has become more hawkish than most, but Australia could look foolish if Biden opens up partnerships with China on climate and pandemic management leaving Australia standing alone.

3) As Congress breaks for Thanksgiving, 12 million Americans may lose their jobless benefits on December 26 unless Congress can agree on a new stimulus deal in the next few weeks. More than half of the 21 million people currently collecting unemployment benefits can be effected. If lawmakers head home for Thanksgiving soon, it is even less likely they will reach a deal before they break for the year in December. As they do, millions of Americans could potentially lose their own residences when the nationwide eviction moratorium also expires at the end of the year. Tens of millions more cannot afford enough food to eat. Additionally, long-term unemployment is on the rise with the share of jobless workers out of work for 27 weeks or more, shot up from 19.1% to 32.5% in October, because there are simply not enough jobs being created to support all of the workers running out of aid before the end of 2020.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 NOV 20:

Dow 29,263.48 down by 219.75
Nasdaq 11,854.97 down by 49.74
S&P 500 3,557.54 down by 24.33

10 Year Yield: down at 0.83%

Oil: up at $42.47

20 October 2020

1) China has warned the U.S. that it may start detaining Americans. Repeated warnings have been made to U.S. government representatives and through multiple channels, including the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. The Chinese have warned that the U.S. should drop prosecutions of the Chinese scholars in American courts, otherwise Americans in China might find themselves in violation of Chinese law. The U.S. began arresting Chinese scientists, who were visiting American universities to conduct research, and charged them with concealing their active duty status with the People’s Liberation Army from U.S. immigration authorities. This tactic is referred to as ‘hostage diplomacy’, which China has used on other countries, such as Canada, Australia and Sweden on what officials from those governments have said are bogus allegations. In September the State Department issued a travel advisory, recommending Americans avoid China travel for a number of reasons, including a warning that the Chinese government detains other countries’ citizens “to gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments”.

2) The oil giant ConocoPhillips is doubling down on crude oil with a major acquisition. Conoco is taking over Concho Resources, a fracker in the Permian Basic with a $9.7 billion dollar ‘all-stock’ takeover. This will make Conoco the largest independent oil-and-gas company in the U.S., with daily production of more than 1.5 million barrels of oil. This will also leave Conoco more exposed to the same forces that have swiftly moved against fossil fuels, and therefore the results of next months elections. Because of the volatility , many investors refrain from the oil market, which met Conoco didn’t have to spend much on the deal. Concho is being acquired at just $10,700 per acre in the Permian Basin, much less than the $40,000 previously paid for the shale oilfield.

3) The private space company SpaceX has launched another 60 Starlink internet relay satellites into orbit, with another set due to launch in a few days. There are now 835 Starlinks in orbit for the rapidly expanding global network, which will eventually number thousands, for high speed internet to any point on the earth. Present plans are to launch at least 120 new Starlinks every month.

4) Stock market closings for – 19 OCT 20:

Dow 28,195.42 down 410.89
Nasdaq 11,478.88 down 192.67
S&P 500 3,426.92 down 56.89

10 Year Yield: up at 0.76%

Oil: down at $40.68

18 February 2020

1) In order to help contain the Chinese coronavirus outbreak, China’s central bank has started deep cleaning and destroying potentially infected cash. The virus appears able to survive on surfaces for many hours which is why buildings in affected areas are regularly disinfecting elevator buttons, door handles and other commonly touched surfaces. Since cash money changes hands multiple times in a day, it too is a potential media to transmit the virus. The cash is disinfected with ultraviolet light and high temperatures, then stored for seven to fourteen days before returning to circulation.

2) The price of wine is expected to drop to its lowest levels in five years, in part because of a surplus of grapes in California. Additionally, there is a decreased demand for wine, with the lower prices lasting up to three years. Vineyards began planting thousands of acres of new vines in 2016, plus more efficient harvesting methods have combined to increase the supply of grapes.

3) GM (General Motors) has decided to pull out of Australia, New Zealand and Thailand as part of their strategy to exit markets that don’t produce adequate returns on investments. The car maker has 828 employees in Australia and New Zealand and another 1,500 in Thailand which will be eliminated.

4) Stock market closings for – 17 FEB 20:

Dow 29,398.08 down 25.23
Nasdaq 9,731.18 up 19.21
S&P 500 3,380.16 up 6.22

10 Year Yield: down at 1.59%

Oil: down at $51.92

3 February 2020

1) Brexit, the exit of Britain from the European Union, has been confirmed by the European Parliament with a vote Wednesday, which ratified the withdrawal agreement. The vote to ratify was 621 to 49 with 13 abstentions. For the EU (European Union) the loss of Britain represents a significant defeat, a loss of size, reach, momentum and permanence akin to the U.S. losing Texas. Potentially, the EU bloc now has less clout, although the remaining 27 countries have been drawn tighter together by the debate. Now comes the negotiations of EU’s future relationship with Britain to try and maintain the single open market.

2) Delta Air Lines and American Airlines announced they are suspending service to mainland China to counter the spread of coronavirus. It is expected that United Airlines is expected to soon follow suit. American will continue service to Hong Kong. Other world air carriers have also announced suspended or reduced services to China.

3) With the decision two years ago by the Supreme Court to widely legalize sports betting, companies are rushing in to expand sports betting operations. U.S. casino operators, fantasy apps and betting grands from Europe and Australia are in a race for American customers now that the way has been cleared for betting outside of Nevada.

4) Stock market closings for – 31 JAN 20: Fears of China’s coronavirus continue to push markets down.

Dow                   28,256.03    down    603.41
Nasdaq               9,150.94     down    148.00
S&P 500              3,225.52     down       58.14

10 Year Yield:    down   at    1.52%

Oil:    down   at    $51.63

12 August 2019

1) The electric car company Tesla Inc is being sued claiming the company limited battery range of its older vehicles using software updates. The alleged intent was for Tesla to avoid costly fixes to defective batteries. The lawsuit is seeking class action status for thousands of Model S and X owners. The suit claims that older generation batteries had their range curtailed by an automatic software update. As a result of a battery fire, Tesla claims they are revising charge and thermal management settings via the software to further protect the battery and improve battery longevity.

2) The Chinese-American trade war hasn’t been bad for all nations, other nations are experiencing increase trade as a result of the war. Australia is the biggest beneficiary with exports to China of natural resources. Second is Switzerland, the third is Mexico which has replaced China as U.S. largest exporter. Fourth is Brazil who is benefitting from agricultural export to China and the fifth is Canada.

3) Malaysia is expanding its efforts to prosecute seventeen Goldman Sachs executives, who were allegedly involved in misleading investors in a $6.5 billion dollar bond sale. The bonds were for the state investment fund, 1 Malaysia Development Bhd or 1MDB. Charges include executives knowing that funds would be siphon off so Malaysia is also seeking to recoup funds and fees.

4) Stock market closings for – 9 AUG 19:

Dow             26,287.44    down    90.75
Nasdaq          7,959.14    down    80.02
S&P 500         2,918.65    down    19.44

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.73%

Oil:    down   at    $54.27

15 July 2019

1) It appears the oil boom in the Permian basins is slowing down as producers dial back growth plans in face of numerous problems. These problems include pipeline limits, reduced flow from wells drilled too close together, low natural gas prices and high land cost. Most serious is that the shale-well oil production is falling off at such a high rate (as much as 70% in first year) that producers are forced to keep spending additional money on new wells in order to maintain production output.

2) Imports from China to U.S. are down by 31% as a result of the trade war. Trade has weakened since the trade war started, with tariffs and counter tariffs and with suppliers looking for alternative countries to fill their orders. This has put pressure on the Chinese government to shore up economic growth and avoid politically dangerous job losses. Nevertheless, Chinese leaders are confident they can survive the tariff fight.

3) The Argyle diamond mine in Western Australia, world’s largest diamond mine, is closing at the end of the next year as diamond supples are exhausted. The mine is famed for the coveted pink and red diamonds it produced, rather than the quantity of lower quality gems it has produced for almost forty years. A glut of cheap and small diamonds has eroded profits worldwide with other diamond mines scheduled to also close operations.

4) Stock market closings for – 12 JUL 19: All three markets closed with record setting highs. Also Standard & Poors broke the 3,000 mark.

Dow               27,332.03    up    243.95
Nasdaq            8,244.14    up     48.10
S&P 500           3,013.77    up     13.86

10 Year Yield:    down   at    2.11%

Oil:    up   at    $60.39

30 May 2019

1) Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders is pushing for measures to give workers a greater ownership in companies, thus transferring power and influence. This would be accomplished by requiring companies to periodically transfer stocks to a fund controlled by employees, giving workers a vote in managing the company while also receiving dividends. Nothing has been said on how to prevent companies from simply moving off shore, as has happened in the past.

2) Tesla, the manufacturer of electric automobiles, is gearing up for production of the Model Y, a crossover SUV with a simpler interior and longer range batteries with a reported 400 mile range. Tesla stock fell more than 10% last week over concerns of demand, profitability and the China-U.S. trade war.

3) Reportedly, China will use rare earths to retaliate against the U.S. in the trade war. This is a group of 17 chemical elements used in a wide range of products, from consumer electronics to military equipment. Chinese newspapers are filled with rhetoric asserting that the U.S. will have no option but to acquiescent to China’s economic policies. Eighty percent of U.S. rare earth imports come from China. However, this strategy by China may accelerate mining of rare earths in California and Australia.

4) 29 MAY 19 Stock market closings: Markets down over concerns of slowing economic growth.

Dow              25,126.41    down    221.36
Nasdaq           7,547.31    down      60.04
S&P 500          2,783.02    down      19.37

10 Year Yield:     down   at    2.24%

Oil:     up   at    $59.21

22 April 19

1) New Jeep Wranglers are being offered for as much as $9,500 dollars off list price. There is an over supply of leftover JL Wranglers, which makes for some really good deals for auto buyers wanting a traditional style SUV.

2) Panama disease is a highly contagious infection which is ravaging banana plantations across the world from Asia to Australia. The Philippines has suffered $400 million dollars in losses, where the world banana cultivation is a $44 billion dollar industry involving the livelihood of 400 million people.

3) Japan’s Mitsubishi Aircraft it about to build Japan’s first airliner in fifty years, to compete with Boeing and Airbus. The small 88 passenger airliner is for the regional air carrier business. Other small aircraft manufactures are also getting into the small carrier airline business betting they can build smaller, simpler and cheaper airliners than Boeing or Airbus.

4) 19 APR 19 Stock market closed for Easter:

ASIAN SHARES RISE HIGHER FOR THE 3RD CONSECUTIVE MONTH…..

asian shares market

By: Economic & Finance Report

 Asian shares heeded higher for the third consecutive month as stocks moved higher for the past couple of days. Bulls seem to be reigning in as prices and stock indexes continue to go to a higher direction. Oil seems to be gaining ground higher as well, the uptrend on stocks and prices is viewed by how well oil can maintain its run upwards.

The Nikkei  posted higher on Wed Feb. 4, 2015, up 1.8% because of banking sector performing unusually well for the day and also very strong company earning reports from Mitsubishi .

Australia’s index also outperformed  climbing 1.2% because of the interest cut instituted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Australia.

-SB