30 June 2020

1) The Boeing Aircraft Co. has started it re-certification process for the 737 MAX with the take off of a test aircraft for the first flight. An FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) pilot was on board as test flights begin, to determine if the aircraft is safe for flying with passengers. The first flight test is to fly maneuvers for about three hours, the test craft being fitted with a number of instruments and monitoring equipment to test and record how the aircraft performs. Test include the ‘wind-up turn’ which is a steep turn that essentially approaches a stall, with wings almost at 90 degrees of bank. This maneuver should trigger the Boeing software system that played a role in both crashes, which caused the aircraft design to be grounded. The software caused the aircraft’s nose to be repeatedly pointed downward at the ground until pilots lost control. These certification flights are expected to take approximately three days, and while they are an important milestone, there remains a number of key tasks to be completed.

2) According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 47.2% of American adults are now jobless, almost half the adult population. This is a direct result of losing 30 million jobs because of the coronavirus crisis. While there was an unexpected snap back in May, there are now signs of a slowdown in the labor market improvement because of fears of a Convid-19 resurgence increased these last few weeks. The massive loss of jobs is what is now dragging the economy down. Both Texas and Florida have paused plans for further reopening because of a record spike in coronavirus cases.

3) Lending institutions are pulling back sharply on their lending to U.S. consumers during the pandemic, because they can’t tell who is creditworthy anymore. There are millions of Americans out of work and behind on their debts, but many of these missed payments aren’t reflected in credit scores. This is a result of the government’s stimulus package which allows borrowers to defer their debt payments, but credit companies can’t report these late payments to credit reporting companies. For May, there were more than 100 million accounts with deferred debt payments. This is a sign of widespread financial distress.

4) Stock market closings for – 29 JUN 20:

Dow 25,595.80 up 580.25
Nasdaq 9,874.15 up 116.93
S&P 500 3,053.24 up 44.19

10 Year Yield: unchanged at 0.64%

Oil: up at $39.55

29 May 2020

1) Another 2.1 million Americans are unemployed as the economy begins its reopening with restriction on economic activity easing in some parts of the country. One bright spot is the number of continued claims (people remaining on unemployment) dropped slightly from people returning to work. While the number of new claims continues to drop each week, it still remains at a record high, with the drop in new claims remaining higher than anticipated. The continued elevated number of claims isn’t a good sign, showing that we are not through the business shutdowns and possible closures yet, with some furloughs shifting over to permanent layoffs. The unemployment in America is now at 40.7 million workers.

2) Boeing aircraft manufacturer may be starting its recovery announcing the resumption of limited production of its 737 MAX after a five month halt. The 737 MAX has been grounded since March of 2018 because of software problems resulting in two airliners crashing. While the FAA has not cleared the airplane for return to passenger service, Boeing expects the 737 MAX to fly again in mid 2020.

3) The millennials and generation-Z are worst off economically than any previous generation, they are experiencing slower economic growth since entering the workforce than any other generation in U.S. history. It’s not just that it’s a bad recession, or that it’s hitting young people more, but rather that it’s hitting people who have already been hit by the Great Recession. Millennials have experienced slower economic growth since entering the workforce than any other generation in U.S. history, and they will bear these economic scars throughout their lives, with lower earnings, lower wealth and delayed milestones, such as home ownership. The old adage of ‘just work harder, sink or swim by your own effort’ no longer applies, because many millennials are now having to swim upstream against a much stronger current . . . from the forces of automation and technology displacement.

4) Stock market closings for – 28 MAY 20:

Dow 25,400.64 down 147.63
Nasdaq 9,368.99 down 43.37
S&P 500 3,029.73 down 6.40

10 Year Yield: up at 0.70%

Oil: down at $33.68

28 May 2020

1) The aircraft manufacture Boeing is laying off almost 12,000 workers this week, a result of the coronavirus crisis impact on the aircraft company. Boeing, which is the largest exporter in the U.S., is trimming its workforce by about 10% which include international locations. It is anticipated the airline industry will take some years to recover with air travel dropping a whopping 95% because of the virus, and major airlines canceling the majority of their domestic flights while suspending nearly all international flights. The company suffered a major set back with its 737 MAX grounding that resulted in near record number of order cancellations for passenger jets with zero new orders in April. This has been Boeing’s worst year in decades.

2) The discount home goods retailer Tuesday Morning has filed for bankruptcy, a result of the prolong store closings from Covid-19. The lost revenues created an insurmountable financial hurdle in a company that was thriving before the pandemic. The chain is closing 230 of its nearly 700 US stores across America. The first phase of closures of 130 stores will begin this summer. This is in line with another home goods retailer, Pier 1, which filed for bankruptcy in February, another casualty of the virus.

3) More than one in every six young workers have stopped working because of the coronavirus pandemic world wide. There are fears that young workers (15 to 28 years old) could face the inability to get proper training or gain access to jobs long after the pandemic ends, maybe even deep into their careers. Of those still working, about 23% report reduction in the number of hours they work. For 178 million young workers around the world, more than 40% are in the food services and hospitality industries, which is the hardest hit sector from the virus. Three fourths of the young workers are in informal jobs or casual labor. In addition, many companies in the U.S. are cutting salaries of those who still have a job, trying to remain in business, which will reduce discretionary income that will further slow economic recovery.

4) Stock market closings for – 27 MAY 20:

Dow 25,548.27 up 553.16
Nasdaq 9,412.36 up 72.14
S&P 500 3,036.13 up 44.367

10 Year Yield: down at 0.68%

Oil: down at $32.22

15 May 2020

1) There are growing fears of another economic bomb about to go off. A popping of the housing bubble, much like the 2008 bubble collapse of the housing market, may happen as early as July. Last time, the collapse of the housing market played out over four years, but for the pandemic, the rate could be much faster, as is being seen with the stock market. Home sales have been languishing, especially with the treat of the virus and people reluctant to let strangers tour their homes with possible infections. It is estimated that 15% of homeowners will fall behind on their mortgages and this would mean more delinquencies than during the Great Depression. This in turn is causing a tightening of lending standards which could continue even after the crisis subsides. All this makes for a bubble waiting to burst.

2) Delta Air Lines Inc. has announced they plan to retire their fleet of eighteen Boeing 777 jumbo jets, and will replace them with Airbus SE aircraft. This constitutes another major financial blow to the beleaguered aircraft manufacture struggling with their 737 MAX troubles from over a year ago. Delta attributes the early retirement of their 777 fleet to the pandemic impact and the need to economize with newer fuel efficient aircraft.

3) Growing fears of a slow recovery is beginning to show cracks in the markets as investor’s anticipation of a quick recovery of the economy fades. For weeks, the hopes that the massive stimulus of $3 trillion dollars would spur a relatively quick recovery later in the year, coupled with a hot rebound of the stock market despite the massive numbers of layoffs, but now hope is fading. The growing economic uncertainty of just how many people can restart their lives amid the uncertainty of controlling the virus, plus the dangers of opening up too early, is causing investors to rethink their view of how the economy will fair in the next few months, even the next few years.

4) Stock market closings for – 14 MAY 20:

Dow 23,625.34 up 377.37
Nasdaq 8,943.72 up 80.55
S&P 500 2,852.50 up 32.50

10 Year Yield: down at 0.62%

Oil: up at $27.98

20 February 2020

1) The chip maker Intel announced a chip which makes quantum computers smaller and faster, thus bringing the promise of quantum computer to realization. Working with QuTech, Intel has developed a new chip called Horse Ridge that should make quantum computers smaller, faster and requires less deep cooling. The system on a chip uses Intel’s FinFET low power process, having four radio frequency channels that control a total of 128 qubits, which is more than double the 49 qubits from back in 2018. For a quantum computer to be viable it needs over 1 million qubits.

2) The technology innovation company Alphabet has ended its work on Makani, a design to generate power using wind turbines attached to kites. While demonstration flights were successful, the path to commercialization was considered to be longer and riskier than expected. Makani was a seven year project which developed a 20 kilowatt demonstrator kite into a utility scale model generating 600 kilowatts.

3) Boeing Aircraft’s 737 MAX has met with another problem- foreign-object debris in the fuel tanks of several aircraft. Boeing is conducting a voluntary inspection for debris in undelivered aircraft with further action based on its findings, but doesn’t anticipate this problem will delay re-certification of the aircraft and it resumption of deliveries. Furthermore, Boeing plans to inspect the fuel tanks on all undelivered 737 MAX planes.

4) Stock market closings for – 19 FEB 20:

Dow 29,348.03 up 115.84
Nasdaq 9,817.18 up 84.44
S&P 500 3,386.15 up 15.86

10 Year Yield: up at 1.57%

Oil: up at $53.56

12 February 2020

1) The demise of the big box and department stores in malls, has spawned a move to trendy local shops. These are standalone small format stores designed to experiment with new retail strategies and increased foot traffic. These stores tend to be positioned closer to neighborhoods away from the malls. The department stores and big box retailers grew rapidly and over saturated the market, while the small format stores have less investments and lower lease costs.

2) Boeing Aircraft company reported zero new orders for this January, while Airbus tallied 274 orders for commercial airplanes in the same month. The company did deliver 13 new airplanes in January, six were 787 Dreamliners, two 777s, two 767 and three 737NG. Boeing is anticipating re-certification of its 737MAX by the middle of 2020.

3) California is now estimated to have 150,000 homeless people, reaching record numbers, of which two-thirds are living on the streets. There are more than 100 homeless camps across Oakland, in which authorities are in the process of dismantling. The homeless scratch out a living doing odd jobs, focus groups or medial trials. The rising cost of housing is the prime force driving people to homelessness, the number increasing each day despite the soaring stock market and record low unemployment rate.

4) Stock market closings for – 11 FEB 20:

Dow 29,276.34 down 0.48
Nasdaq 9,638.94 up 10.55
S&P 500 3,357.75 up 5.66

10 Year Yield: up at 1.59%

Oil: up at $50.07

29 January 2020

1) Amazon it pushing hard to establish its Kuiper broadband internet access satellite system. The planned satellite system will have 3,236 satellites in polar orbits to form a mega-constellation system in low earth orbit that will provide broadband internet service for billions of people around the world who are currently being under served. Amazon is pushing the FCC for expeditious granting of application for system. SpaceX and One Web have also started their planned mega-constellation satellite system.

2) North Korea’s economy is largely hidden from the world because it’s one of the most secretive nations. But it’s known the economy is struggling because of its isolationism, where the average worker makes less than $2,000 a year with much of its population undernourished. Citizens are paying as much as $12,000 to defect.

3) Boeing Aircraft has secured over $12 billion dollars to finance its 737 MAX crisis. Loans from over a dozen banks will shore up Boeing’s balance sheet until deliveries of its 737 MAX can resume with resulting revenues coming in. This is at least $2 billion dollars more than Boeing originally sought, making the loans a vote of confidence of its future. The loan is a delayed-draw loan, meaning the company may not use it immediately.

4) Stock market closings for – 28 JAN 20: Markets rebound from threat of coronavirus.

Dow                      28,722.85    up    187.05
Nasdaq                  9,269.68    up     130.37
S&P 500                 3,276.24    up       32.61

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.64%

Oil:    up   at    $53.98

21 January 2020

1) As Boeing’s 737 MAX crisis continues, Boeing is talking with banks to borrow $10 billion dollars or more to finance the rising cost from its 737 MAX woes. So far, the company has borrowed $6 billion dollars to cover its cash-sapped operations after having suspended production of the planes this month. The crisis which grounded the 737 MAX is now entering its eleventh month.

2) The global auto industry continues its downward slide into deeper recession with sales down 4%. Automakers are struggling to find buyers in China and India, with the downward trend expected to continue this year. The number of vehicles sold dropped from 94.4 million down to 90.3 million last year, with the record high in 2017 of 95.2 million. The IMF says new autos account for 5.7% of economic output and 8% of the goods exported. Autos are the second largest consumer of steel and aluminum.

3) Because of unrest in Iraq and Libya, oil rose to its highest in more than a week. Oil prices have always been heavily influenced by geopolitical instability, especially those countries heavily involved with oil exports. Lybia has Africa’s largest oil reserves, with their Sharara oil field being Lybia’s largest by pumping 300,000 barrels a day.

4) Stock market closings for – 20 JAN 20:

Dow              29,348.10    up    50.46
Nasdaq          9,388.94    up     31.81
S&P 500         3,329.62    up    12.81

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.84%

Oil:    down   at    $58.70

20 January 2020

1) A year ago, Boeing Aircraft had record revenues of over $100 billion dollars, anticipating delivery of record number of aircraft including the 737 MAX jetliner. With the grounding of its 737 MAX, that has been reversed with Boeing posting losses from massive pay outs as well as lost revenues as undelivered aircraft sit waiting in its parking lots. Boeing may ultimately have $20 billion dollars in cost from the 737 MAX problem. Boeing’s problems has been a bonus for China’s airline manufacturing giving them a big advantage to gain market share.

2) India is resisting Amazon’s efforts to expand into India with an investment of $1 billion dollars, fearful of predatory business practices. The investment would bring Amazon India investment up to $6.5 billion dollars. But Amazon is meeting growing resistance, first with an Indian anti-trust investigation by Indian regulators, then protest from a confederation of Indian traders and organizations.

3) As hiring surged in November, the employment market got tighter, job openings plunged to their lowest level in nearly two years. The total vacancies is down by 561,000 to 6.8 million for the month. This is the lowest since February of 2018, the trend telling the economy has finally reached full employment. The biggest drops came in retail and construction.

4) Stock market closings for – 17 JAN 20: All three exchanges closed on record highs.

Dow          29,348.10    up    50.46
Nasdaq       9,388.94    up    31.81
S&P 500      3,329.62    up     12.81

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.84%

Oil:    up   at    $58.81

14 January 2020

1) Ford Motor Company’s sales in China has declined for the third straight year, falling by 26.1%. The company has been trying to revive sales in China after the decline started in 2017 and plans to introduce thirty new models in the next three years, with a third being electric models. General Motors has also experienced a decline in sales of 15% this last year.

2) One of the largest suppliers of parts to Boeing’s 737 MAX, Spirit AeroSystems, is laying off 2,800 workers. Based in Wichita Kansas, will eliminate 20% of its workforce. Smaller layoffs will happen at its facilities in Tulsa and McAlester, with half its annual sales from parts for the 737 MAX. Since last February, Spirit’s stock has fell from a high of $100 a share to $71.50 on news of the layoffs.

3) Expectations are that the U.S. will remove China from its list of currency manipulators two days before the signing of initial U.S. – China trade agreement. Part of the agreement is that both nations will not devalue its currency to gain a competitive advantages of exports. Labeling China a currency manipulator was viewed largely as a symbolic action.

4) Stock market closings for – 13 JAN 20: Stocks are up 495% in the past decade.

Dow             28,907.05    up    83.28
Nasdaq          9,273.93    up    95.07
S&P 500         3,288.13    up    22.78

10 Year Yield:    up   at    1.85%

Oil:    down   at    $58.12