6 August 2020

1) Rocket Companies Inc., the parent company of Rocket Mortgage and Quicken Loans, is trying to raise $2 billion dollars with an IPO (Initial Public Offering) after an initial capital target of $3.3 billion dollars. The reduction in the number of shares offered is believed to be because of push back from investors, who considered the valuation of the company as to high. This is based on the company being more of a consumer based company rather than a technology based company. The downsizing may signal that the IPO market’s rebound is straining as the coronavirus pandemic deepens in America.

2) Entertainment giant Disney has announced that its streaming service Disney+ (pronounced Disney plus) has surpassed 60 million subscribers, which is well ahead of Disney’s target. Disney forecasted having 60 to 90 million subscribers by 2024, fueling speculation that Disney+ has won the first stage of the streaming wars. Netflix presently has 193 million paying subscribers, but with Disney+, which was just launched last November less than a year ago, it’s clear that Disney is very rapidly gaining on Netflix, and liable to be passed by Disney in the near future. More importantly, Disney should reach profitability very soon too, something hard for new streaming services to do.

3) The ‘Services PMI’ index from the Institute for Supply Management, posted its second monthly gain in July. This indicated that despite the rising number of Covid-19 cases, the services economy keeps recovering. There is a continued weakness in the international component of services with worries of how the international economy will eventually effect America’s recovery. Investors remain focused on earnings and hopes of a vaccine to push the economy upwards more. There is still the looming question of how many of the small businesses will survive the pandemic, and therefore how much of the economy will be changed by their demise.

4) Stock market closings for – 5 AUG 20:

Dow 27,201.52 up 373.05
Nasdaq 10,998.40 up 57.23
S&P 500 3,327.77 up 21.26

10 Year Yield: up at 0.54%

Oil: up at $42.20

5 August 2020

1) The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) has issued a 36 page document detailing the fixes and training that Boeing needs to implement so the 737 MAX can return to commercial service. The document was in the works before the planes were grounded in the spring of 2019, a result of two air crashes. There were few requirements that Boeing management wasn’t already aware of, and it’s considered a milestone in the certification process. The document only applies to 737 MAX aircraft flying in the U.S., and it is expected the changes will be adopted by aviation regulators around the world. Once done, all 737 MAX jets will undergo an operational readiness flight prior to returning each airplane to service. The European Union Aviation Safety Agency is waiting on doing its flight test as the FAA moves ahead.

2) The oil company giant Exxon Mobil Corp., is seeking the dismissal of a climate change lawsuit brought on by the Massachusetts attorney general. The lawsuit alleges that Exxon defrauded consumers and investors by the company’s public position on climate change, that Exxon hid its early knowledge of climate change and misled investors about the projected financial impact of global warming on its business. Exxon claims the law suit amounts to improper retaliation against the company over its views on climate change. The bases for Exxon’s challenge is the state’s anti-Slapp law which prohibits the use of litigation to punish a defendant for statements on matters that are under consideration by a legislative or judicial body.

3) The Department of Labor has come down hard on social investing or EAG, proposing rules that strongly limit such activities for private pension plans covered by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). They consider that pension fund investing is not the place to solve the ills of the world, that it is unlawful for a fiduciary to sacrifice return or accept additional risk to promote a public policy, political or any other nonpecuniary goal.

4) Stock market closings for – 4 AUG 20:

Dow 26,828.47 up 164.07
Nasdaq 10,941.17 up 38.37
S&P 500 3,306.51 up 11.90

10 Year Yield: down at 0.52%

Oil: up at $41.53

4 August 2020

1) Tailored Brands, who owns Men’s Wearhouse and Jos. A. Bank, has filed for bankruptcy, becoming the latest retailer to succumb to the pandemic. The Covid-19 has wiped out demand for office attire forcing the layoffs of 20% of its workforce and closing up to 500 stores. Lord & Taylor, one of the oldest department stores in America has also filed for bankruptcy. It has started liquidating 19 of its 38 stores. In the first half of 2020, more than 3,600 companies have filed for bankruptcy, with experts predicting that things are only going to get worse. Retail names such as Justice, Ann Taylor, Lane Bryant, Luck Brand, J.C. Penny, Brooks Brothers, Sur La Table, Neiman Marcus, Tuesday Morning, Tailored Brands, GNC and J. Crew have gone into bankruptcy. Such a large number of retailers in trouble can only signal a fundamental change in the American economy.

2) The airline industry in America is facing a round of layoffs in the near future without additional federal aid to save jobs. The airlines received $32 billion dollars in federal payroll support from the CARES Act, with the condition of no layoffs until 30 September, and the anticipation of air traveling increasing by then. But this hasn’t occurred, so as the end of September approaches, layoffs loom. The airline unions have been pushing for an extension in payroll support to preserve the jobs sector of the airlines. American Airlines and United Airlines warn that more than 60,000 employees risk losing heir jobs when the aid terms expire. Other airlines like Alaska, Sprint and Frontier also warn of upcoming layoffs.

3) The owner of 7-Eleven is buying Marathon Petroleum’s Speedway gas stations for $21 billion dollars in cash. This will increase the present 9,800 convenience store chains by another 4,000. Investors were unnerved by the steep price for the deal, with shares falling nearly 9%. Like many other retailers, the chain has also been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, with profits down significantly. Another acquisition that finalized is T-Mobile buying Sprint, with the Sprint brand name disappearing from the American business scene.

4) Stock market closings for – 3 AUG 20:

Dow 26,664.40 up 236.08
Nasdaq 10,902.80 up 157.52
S&P 500 3,294.61 up 23.49

10 Year Yield: up at 0.56%

Oil: down at $40.76

3 August 2020

1) Another sign of how badly the pandemic has wrecked the world economy is the huge losses that Exxon Mobil and Chevron have reported for the second quarter. The losses were even worst than Wall Street expected. Both stocks were the biggest losers in the Dow. Exxon lost $1.1 billion dollars with Chevron losing $8.3billion dollars. Oil is a principle component in a modern economy, and therefore a strong indicator of how an economy is doing.

2) Another internet satellite system has been approved by the FCC (Federal Communications Commission). Amazon’s Project Kuiper is a network in the sky of 3,236 satellites which will provide broadband internet access with the restriction that it doesn’t interfere with previously authorized satellite ventures. Amazon plans to invest $10 billion dollars in the project to compete with SpaceX, OneWeb and Telesat systems. Service will begin once the first 578 satellites have been launched. It’s expected service will begin sometime before 2026.

3) High tech giant Google has announced they are formally extending work from home until the summer of 2021. The extension will affect about 200,000 employees to include contractors and full time workers, including operations off shore. Most of the other tech companies have set at home working until the end of this year, but Google’s announcement fuels speculation if other companies will follow suit and extend their at home work schedule. Google was one of the first companies to implement work at home policy in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

4) Stock market closings for – 31 JUL 20:

Dow 26,428.32 +114.67 +0.44%
Nasdaq 10,745.28 +157.46 +1.49%
S&P 500 3,271.12 +24.90 +0.77%

10 Year Yield: 0.54% -0.00 —

Oil: down at $40.43

MICROSOFT TALK HEATS UP IN PURCHASING TIK TOK APP!!!!!!!!!!!!

By: Economic & Finance Report

Say it ain’t so….. Well there is a lot of chit chat and jibber jabber that Mr. or Ms. Internet Explorer (however you want to look at it); Microsoft Inc is exploring acquiring the famous social media app Tik Tok from China based ByteDance.

Talks began as the White House and President Trump are seriously considering banning the mega app, for US national security protocols and reasons. Analysts have indicated that Microsoft buying Tik Tok would be beneficial to the software conglomerate; allowing it to enter the social media space which Microsoft has dabbled in the past.

Experts have indicated that Tik Tok’s valuation seems to be exploding toward the upside and the purchase of Tik Tok by Microsoft or another tech company would make a lot of $en$e and $cent$. -SB

Image Source: News18.com

31 July 2020

1) The American economy last quarter is the worst on record, with a 32.9% annual rate contraction (April – June). American business ground to a halt from the pandemic lockdown this spring, leaving the country in its first recession in eleven years. This wipes out five years of economic gains in just months. From January to March, the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) declined by an annualized rate of 5%. While the unemployment is declining as states open up from the shutdown, there are still about 15 million unemployed workers. Americans are spending less money during th lockdown, partly because of lost of jobs. Consumer spending is the biggest driver of the economy, and it declined at an annual rate of 34.6% for the second quarter.

2) While Walmart has posted surging sales for each month, it is still taking cost savings measures. The retailer has laid off hundreds of workers including store planning, logistics, merchandising and real estate. Also, Walmart is reorganizing its 4,750 stores by consolidation of divisions and eliminating some regional manager roles. Walmart is performing well because of high demand and low prices during the pandemic. The company isn’t opening as many new stores in the U.S. anymore, so Walmart doesn’t need as many people to find new locations and so design them.

3) Job postings in technology are 36% down from 2019 levels. This is attributed to increased competition, low priority in hiring and uncertainty over the pandemic. Therefore, the tech industry is also feeling the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Sending a very significant portion of its workers remote to work at home, there were predictions tech jobs would lead the recovery with increase job numbers. The ‘work at home’ was thought to show tech jobs might be available outside the traditional hubs. Neither has proved to be true. In short, the tech jobs are faring worst than the overall economy.

4) Stock market closings for – 30 JUL 20:

Dow 26,313.65 down 225.92
Nasdaq 10,587.81 up 44.87
S&P 500 3,246.22 down 12.22

10 Year Yield: down at 0.54%

Oil: down at $40.45

BUSINESSMAN & FMR PRES. CANDIDATE HERMAN CAIN HAS DIED….

By: Economic & Finance Report

Businessman and former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain has died from corona virus (Covid-19) at age 74 years old. Mr. Cain was a Republican presidential candidate in the 2012 elections. He came up with the 9-9-9 Plan which was tax proposal for fixing the USA tax code. It was a paramount plan for his campaign. He was a former chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

Before his journey into politics and monetary policy, Herman can was CEO and President of Godfather Pizza (subsidiary of Burger King). After his stint at Godfather Pizza he became the CEO of the National Restaurant Association. He was also on various company board of directors as well. -SB

Image Credit: CBSNews.com

30 July 2020

1) First Walmart then Target and Dick’s Sporting Goods and now Best Buy have announced they will be closed on Thanksgiving, with more retailers expected to follow suit. The decision is in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Traditionally, Thanksgiving Day is the kick off of Black Friday sales, where retailers offer their lowest sales prices as the kickoff of the Christmas shopping season. But this also draws large crowds, something that goes against public health guidelines for social distancing. Instead, retailers will be offering their big sales online.

2) The spending habits of millennials had been credited with the decline of traditional consumer products, but now seem to be reversing for comebacks. Things like golf, starter homes and canned tuna are now on the rise, in part because of the covid-19 crisis. Some other products now on the rise is beer, mayo and cereal to name a few. More indications of how economic times in America are ever changing and becoming more unpredictable.

3) The pandemic crisis has sent the U.S. Postal Service into a fiscal tailspin, with President Trump saying he would not support a financial bailout until the Postoffice reformed its pricing of package deliveries for large on-line retailers like Amazon. But the federal government is preparing a $10 billion dollar loan to the Postoffice to continue services. This loan is part of the proposed $2 trillion dollar pandemic relief package passed in March, but the President said he wont spend the money until the USPS agrees to raise its prices. Much of the online retail business is dependent on the USPS to deliver their goods via mail delivery.

4) Stock market closings for – 29 JUL20:

Dow 26,539.57 up 160.29
Nasdaq 10,542.94 up 140.85
S&P 500 3,258.44 up 40.00

10 Year Yield: down at 0.58%

Oil: up at $41.32

29 July 2020

1) The fast food mega-giant McDonald’s is reporting a bigger than expected drop in global restaurant sales across the world. This is a result of the pandemic restricting sales of their drive thru and delivery operations, and in some cases shutting restaurants down completely. With second quarter sales down by 30%, McDonald’s is facing a bumpy and expensive recovery. The franchise chain has 39,000 restaurants worldwide, of which 96% are now open, verses 75% at the start of the second quarter. Store sales were down 39% in April but by June was down only 12%. Net income is down by 68% for $483.8 million dollars. McDonald’s is permanently closing 200 locations in the U.S. amid those losses, more than half located in Walmart stores.

2) The Federal Reserve has announced that its lending programs will be extended until the end of the year. This indicates the feds don’t think the U.S. economy is weathering the pandemic storm very well and needs continued help. The program lends to small and medium sized businesses and was due to expire at the end of September. Continuing the program will provide a critical backstop to help the economy recover. This Thursday will bring the first look at the second quarter gross domestic product, which is the broadest measure of the economy, but it’s expected to show an ailing economy.

3) For the second time, the renowned gun maker Remington Arms is filing for bankruptcy. This is the second time in two years that Remington has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Chronic low sales is blamed for Remington’s decline, despite the overall increase in sales of guns in America because of the pandemic. One by one, American gun manufactures have succumb to imports. Remington reports assets of $100 million dollars compared to $500 million dollars in liabilities.

4) Stock market closings for – 28 JUL 20:

Dow 26,379.28 down 205.49
Nasdaq 10,402.09 down 134.17
S&P 500 3,218.44 down 20.97

10 Year Yield: down at 0.58%

Oil: down at $41.07

28 July 2020

1) Economist are warning that the economy needs help now to avoid faltering. As the President and Congress struggle to create another economic aid package, evidence is growing that the U.S. economy is headed for trouble, especially if the government doesn’t take steps to support hiring and economic growth. Experts say the economy is in a pretty fragile state again and needs another shot in the arm. Unemployment is still at a high 11.1% and hiring seems to be slowing in July, so the economy is likely to weaken further. Few economist consider that the recovery will be a V-shaped path, that is, the sharp recession will be followed by a quick rebound. In addition to helping the millions of unemployed Americans, the governments needs to help businesses from going bust.

2) There are five trends which indicate the U.S. economy is not rebounding as hope. The first is ‘Direction Requests’ on smart phones for walking and driving directions, have gone flat over the last few weeks indicating people are staying at home. The second is ‘Restaurant Bookings’ which show a 60% drop from last year. Third trend is ‘Hotel Occupancy’ which has stagnated with occupancy at 47%. ‘Air Travel’ was slowly increasing, but has also stagnated this last month with air travel down 70% from last year. Finally, ‘Home Purchases’ is increasing at a slow rate, a reflection of peoples uncertainty and changing employment status of potential buyers.

3) Price of gold continues to climb, as investors seek the safety of the yellow metal amidst economic fears of the future. Gold has historically been a refuge for money in times of economic uncertainty, a panic investment. Bullion has climbed to a record high of $1,946 per ounce. The real interest rates (less inflation) is driving investors to gold, as well as the tumbling dollar. Silver bullion is also increasing in price as another safe heaven for investing.

4) Stock market closings for – 27 JUL 20:

Dow 26,584.77 up 114.88
Nasdaq 10,536.27 up 173.09
S&P 500 3,239.41 up 23.78

10 Year Yield: up at 0.61%

Oil: up at $41.66